Naked Genetics

Naked Genetics episode

Fri, 13th Jul 2012

Hacking biology - synthetic DNA and experimental evolution

DNA Helix (c)

Every biology student is familiar with DNA - the ladder-like blueprint of life built on a backbone of the sugar deoxyribose. Scientists are now hacking this structure to make entirely new DNA-like molecules built on different sugar skeletons, opening an exciting new world of synthetic genetics. Plus, we find out what happens when music has sex, discover why the X chromosome is more than just a number, and our gene of the month is the unfortunate Ken and Barbie.

Listen Now    Download as mp3

In this edition of Naked Genetics

Full Transcript

  • 01:10 - Synthetic DNA - Dr Phil Holliger

    Every biology student is familiar with DNA - the ladder-like blueprint of life built on a backbone of the sugar deoxyribose. Scientists are now hacking this structure to make entirely new DNA-like molecules built on different sugar skeletons, opening an exciting new world of syn...

  • 07:08 - Evolution of music

    This is a really interesting study looking at the evolution of music and this was published in the PNAS and it was led by Robert MacCallum and Armand LeRoi from Imperial College.

  • 09:51 - Blocking pathological rage - in mice

    This is from Marco Bortolato at the University of Southern California and this is looking at the genetics of rage.

  • 11:56 - Super-scissors for DNA

    The final story that we’ve got is a really nice paper published in Science. This is from Jennifer Doudna at the University of California Berkeley who's been looking at how bacteria use certain molecules like molecular scissors to snip up their DNA and glue it together.

  • 13:51 - Finding a new flu gene

    An international team of scientists have discovered a new gene in the flu virus, despite it being 30 years since the flu genome was first decoded.

  • 14:54 - Genetic cut-and-pasting gave us limbs

    New research led by Jordi Garcia-Fernández and Manuel Irimia at the University of Barcelona and published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports suggests that genetic “cut and pasting” could have been the driving factor behind the origin of vertebrate limbs.

  • 15:36 - New gene could lead to tastier tomatoes

    Hot on the heels of last month’s announcement of the full sequence of the tomato genome, plant researchers at the University of California, Davis, have discovered a genetic tweak that could make bland supermarket tomatoes taste more like classic heirloom varieties

  • 16:46 - Hacking the cell's machinery - Dr Jason Chin

    We’ve already heard about the scientists working on the frontiers of DNA, but others are taking things further, hacking the machinery inside our cells that translates the information encoded in our DNA into proteins to create strange new molecules previously unknown in nature. ...

Supported by

 

 

 

Multimedia

Subscribe Free

Related Content

Comments

Make a comment

See the whole discussion | Make a comment


-
Not working please enable javascript
EPSRC
Powered by UKfast
STFC
Genetics Society
ipDTL