Science Podcasts

Naked Scientists episode

Sun, 19th Nov 2006

Science in Antarctica

As winter approaches, we take a trip down south to look at some of the cool research going on in Antarctica. Dr Jane Francis from Leeds University talks about six-foot penguins and a time when Antarctica was warm and ice-free, Kate Hendry from the University of Oxford describes what it's like to work in Antarctica today, and Derek and Dave bring a welcome injection of heat as they find out how hand warmers work. We then dive into the waters around Antarctica with Dr Povl Abrahamsen from the British Antarctic Survey, who uses automated subs to look under the ice sheets and find out how they're changing, and Dr Mike Fedak from the University of St. Andrews describes how his team have attached data collection instruments to the fur of elephant seals to explore completely unchartered depths of the Southern Ocean.

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In this edition of Naked Scientists

Full Transcript

  • How can frogs survive freezing?

    I saw a documentary about frogs, which during the winter literally freeze solid. Come spring, they seem to de-freeze and come back to life. How do they do this?

  • Is odour is a matter of fact or opinion?

    I am having an argument with a friend, about whether or not body odour is a matter of fact or opinion. Can you recommend any relevant articles?.

  • Why is there a lake under the antarctic?

    Since the Antarctic is landlocked, is it believed that underneath the ice but above the land (in other words sandwiched between the two), there is an ocean of water? And where does it come from? Also, what's melting the ice? Is it energy or...

  • How can beer freeze immediately?

    Sometimes when I put my beer (330mL glass bottle) in the deep freeze to rapidly chill it, I can take it out and it's still liquid. If I then leave it for a few minutes on the side and come back to drink it, it goes all icy. Why is this? Sur...

 

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