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1
'Empty' space has mass which is displaced by the particles of matter which exist in it and move through it.


Therefore it has density and an elestic modulus. I've shown you how to calculate one if you know the other, and you consistently refuse to answer the question, so I must assume you are lying about its existence, or are complete ignoramus. Your choice, but I won't waste any more time arguing with you in either case, and I strongly advise others to do likewise.
2
Physiology & Medicine / Re: Do antiretroviral drugs cause lumps?
« Last post by eeyore on Today at 20:57:11 »
It warms my heart to read this request --remembering, as I do, when HIV infection was a death sentence.

Lipodystrophy  ("lumps") is a fairly common side effect of some antireroviral drugs. The alternative would be to stop taking them and wait for death to happen. Death from AIDS is frequently highly unpleasant. I expect that I, myself, could endure many, many lumps and all the other little chingalderas one might see before I would stop taking these drugs --having witnessed the alternative too many times.

As to a "cure" for AIDs ( or any other diseases ) what is required is to spend the money for medical research, instead of nuclear attack subs
3
You need to read this https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Born_rule and then look at results from the triple slit experiment then tell me you know how a wave behaves.

NON-LINEAR WAVE MECHANICS A CAUSAL INTERPRETATION by LOUIS DE BROGLIE

Quote
“Since 1954, when this passage was written, I have come to support wholeheartedly an hypothesis proposed by Bohm and Vigier. According to this hypothesis, the random perturbations to which the particle would be constantly subjected, and which would have the probability of presence in terms of [the wave-function wave], arise from the interaction of the particle with a “subquantic medium” which escapes our observation and is entirely chaotic, and which is everywhere present in what we call “empty space”.”

The “subquantic medium” is the aether.

‘Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy’
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/fluid-systems-quantum-mechanics-0912

Quote
“The fluidic pilot-wave system is also chaotic. It’s impossible to measure a bouncing droplet’s position accurately enough to predict its trajectory very far into the future. But in a recent series of papers, Bush, MIT professor of applied mathematics Ruben Rosales, and graduate students Anand Oza and Dan Harris applied their pilot-wave theory to show how chaotic pilot-wave dynamics leads to the quantumlike statistics observed in their experiments.”

A “fluidic pilot-wave system” is the aether.

‘When Fluid Dynamics Mimic Quantum Mechanics’
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130729111934.htm

Quote
“If you have a system that is deterministic and is what we call in the business ‘chaotic,’ or sensitive to initial conditions, sensitive to perturbations, then it can behave probabilistically,” Milewski continues. “Experiments like this weren’t available to the giants of quantum mechanics. They also didn’t know anything about chaos. Suppose these guys — who were puzzled by why the world behaves in this strange probabilistic way — actually had access to experiments like this and had the knowledge of chaos, would they have come up with an equivalent, deterministic theory of quantum mechanics, which is not the current one? That’s what I find exciting from the quantum perspective.”

What waves in a double slit experiment is the aether.
4
You need to read this https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Born_rule and then look at results from the triple slit experiment then tell me you know how a wave behaves.
5
Don't go posting evidence! Who needs evidence. Certainly not aetherists.

You mean like the evidence that the particle is always detected traveling through a single slit in a double slit experiment because it always travels through a single slit?
6


Water molecules which are also particles exhibit ALL of the properties quoted by you, including; interference, diffraction and so on. What is good for the goose is good for the ...........! Common sense to think that any 'particle' of that level of magnitude is going to demonstrate all of these properties not because it has wave like properties but because it is so small.  Incidentally, no-one is doubting for a minute that the electron is a charged particle and  can interact in the way it does.

Too bad for you scientists have proven that objects with about a trillion or so atoms also behave according to quantum mechanics:

http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100317/full/news.2010.130.html

Quote from: The Link
Cleland and his team took a more direct measure of quantum weirdness at the large scale. They began with a a tiny mechanical paddle, or 'quantum drum', around 30 micrometres long that vibrates when set in motion at a particular range of frequencies. Next they connected the paddle to a superconducting electrical circuit that obeyed the laws of quantum mechanics. They then cooled the system down to temperatures below one-tenth of a kelvin.

At this temperature, the paddle slipped into its quantum mechanical ground state. Using the quantum circuit, Cleland and his team verified that the paddle had no vibrational energy whatsoever. They then used the circuit to give the paddle a push and saw it wiggle at a very specific energy.

Next, the researchers put the quantum circuit into a superposition of 'push' and 'don't push', and connected it to the paddle. Through a series of careful measurements, they were able to show that the paddle was both vibrating and not vibrating simultaneously.

Don't go posting evidence! Who needs evidence. Certainly not aetherists.
7
Monte McGlaun  asked the Naked Scientists:
   In the latest call-in episode I heard, a caller told of dropping a cup of coffee that hit perfectly on the floor and sent the contents all over him and others.
I had a similar experience while in engineering grad school.  I was at a church social holding a screaming hot styro cup of coffee and let it slip.  I looked down as it fell to the floor and I said "oh nooo!"  It hit perfectly square.  The center of liquid in the cup continued downward pushing the outer portion of liquid next to the surface of the cup upward in a hollow cylinder.  I don't know how high the cylinder went, but it went back down into the cup and nearly all the contents ejected straight back up the center right into my face.  It was room temperature by that time.  I was soaked.  

Monte McGlaun





 
What do you think?
8


Water molecules which are also particles exhibit ALL of the properties quoted by you, including; interference, diffraction and so on. What is good for the goose is good for the ...........! Common sense to think that any 'particle' of that level of magnitude is going to demonstrate all of these properties not because it has wave like properties but because it is so small.  Incidentally, no-one is doubting for a minute that the electron is a charged particle and  can interact in the way it does.

Too bad for you scientists have proven that objects with about a trillion or so atoms also behave according to quantum mechanics:

http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100317/full/news.2010.130.html

Quote from: The Link
Cleland and his team took a more direct measure of quantum weirdness at the large scale. They began with a a tiny mechanical paddle, or 'quantum drum', around 30 micrometres long that vibrates when set in motion at a particular range of frequencies. Next they connected the paddle to a superconducting electrical circuit that obeyed the laws of quantum mechanics. They then cooled the system down to temperatures below one-tenth of a kelvin.

At this temperature, the paddle slipped into its quantum mechanical ground state. Using the quantum circuit, Cleland and his team verified that the paddle had no vibrational energy whatsoever. They then used the circuit to give the paddle a push and saw it wiggle at a very specific energy.

Next, the researchers put the quantum circuit into a superposition of 'push' and 'don't push', and connected it to the paddle. Through a series of careful measurements, they were able to show that the paddle was both vibrating and not vibrating simultaneously.
9
For those unfamiliar with "i of the vortex;" Dr. Llinás suggests that the purpose of consciousness is to build a reliable map & thus facilitate movement of the organism viably through the environment.  An excellent description of brain function & well argued assertions about its purpose.

Another insightful scientist is Stephen Lehar; he's done some work on visual cortex: i just saw a video of his on youtube about ontological monism & epistemological dualism.  It occurred to me that "Gnosis" has a claim to dualism, seeing as how it's about knowing.

So; to further the question: is the name "Gnosis" grounded in the introspective observation of epistemological dualism?
10
In fact the GAT has a mathematically supported explanation for it.  I can post the explanation in New Theories if you like.

Please do!
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