The Naked Scientists

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21
There is evidence of aether every time a double slit experiment is performed; it's what waves.

Aether has mass. Aether physically occupies three dimensional space. Aether is physically displaced by the particles of matter which exist in it and move through it.

The Milky Way's halo is not a clump of stuff anchored to the Milky Way. The Milky Way is moving through and displacing the aether.

The Milky Way's halo is the state of displacement of the aether.

The Milky Way's halo is the deformation of spacetime.l

What is referred to geometrically as the deformation of spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the aether.

A moving particle has an associated aether displacement wave. In a double slit experiment the particle travels through a single slit and the associated wave in the aether passes through both.

Q. Why is the particle always detected traveling through a single slit in a double slit experiment?
A. The particle always travels through a single slit. It is the associated wave in the aether which passes through both.

What ripples when galaxy clusters collide is what waves in a double slit experiment; the aether.

Einstein's gravitational wave is de Broglie's wave of wave-particle duality; both are waves in the aether.

Aether displaced by matter relates general relativity and quantum mechanics.
22
Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: A poll on relativistic mass
« Last post by Bill S on 22/11/2014 20:40:05 »
Pete, when you have contributed so generously to my ďpollĒ, it feels a bit mean not to have reciprocated by joining yours.  However, Iím sure you will understand that I donít want to get too far out of my depth. 

Before I read this thread I thought relativistic mass was effectively equivalent to inertia. 

Now Iíve read the thread, I thing ďI donít know nuffin' Ē.   :(
23
I find the same thing. My reading glasses improve both near and far away vision. I use my older weaker glasses for walking around or driving. I could never adjust to bifocals.
24
Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: Can we lay nothing to rest?
« Last post by jeffreyH on 22/11/2014 20:15:18 »
Alan, there are still a couple of unresolved points lingering in #8; I hope you will return to give us at least one more injection of down-to-earth scientific opinion before this thread meanders off into the bog of eternal nothingness.

The bog cannot be eternal as nothingness has nothing to do with time. Nothing would change so time would not exist. How do you measure a period of nothingness and what parameters do you use?
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Radio Show & Podcast Feedback / None
« Last post by Jay on 22/11/2014 20:14:08 »
Did any of you even read the article above?  Why are you all trying to answer the question (wrongly) that was answered already?
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Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: Can we lay nothing to rest?
« Last post by Bill S on 22/11/2014 20:09:35 »
Alan, there are still a couple of unresolved points lingering in #8; I hope you will return to give us at least one more injection of down-to-earth scientific opinion before this thread meanders off into the bog of eternal nothingness.
27
Just Chat ! / phone app.
« Last post by cheryl j on 22/11/2014 20:02:15 »
O down loaded the phone app but can't figure out how to get to the forum on it.
28
Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: Can we lay nothing to rest?
« Last post by Bill S on 22/11/2014 19:58:48 »
Quote from: dlorde
...the universe may be finite and closed and still be all there is.

Agreed, but what is beyond the outer boundary of the finite universe?

Let me guess; the question is meaningless.   8D
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Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: Can we lay nothing to rest?
« Last post by Bill S on 22/11/2014 19:54:49 »
Thanks Pete.

Quote from: Pete
 
Quote from: Bill S
If there had ever been (absolutely) nothing, could there be something now?   
  Yes

You have still not told me how something can emerge from nothing.
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Physics, Astronomy & Cosmology / Re: Can we lay nothing to rest?
« Last post by Bill S on 22/11/2014 19:46:28 »
Dlorde, I admire your evasive subtlety.  Let's consider a more mundane example.  You and I look into a room which we agree is devoid of human occupants.  I say: "There's no one in that room."  You say: "There cannot be no one in that room, because "no one" is a negation, so it cannot "be".  Is that not tantamount to your saying that there must be someone in that room?
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