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Author Topic: swollen glands... what, where, and why?  (Read 4078 times)

Offline kdlynn

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swollen glands... what, where, and why?
« on: 15/09/2007 05:31:26 »
when you have a sore throat, you often have swollen glands. what are these glands, and why do they swell? also, are there some located in places other than your neck?


 

Offline dkv

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swollen glands... what, where, and why?
« Reply #1 on: 15/09/2007 19:06:33 »
It is defence mechanism broadly used to counter the external threat from germs bacteria and viruses.
The war between foreign agent and internal mechanism cause heavy casualities on both sides ... resulting in swollen glands due to over exertion and disproportionate demands for backup in the war.
 

Offline chris

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swollen glands... what, where, and why?
« Reply #2 on: 15/09/2007 21:02:10 »
"Glands" are lymph nodes. Medically-speaking, when they swell, this is known as "adenopathy" or "lymphadenopathy". They form a chain from the tonsils and adenoids (another set of lymph nodes at the back of the nose) down each side of the neck to the thorax.

Lymph nodes are a major site at which specialised cell types "present" foreign antigens to the immune system. So when a region of the head and neck is infected, components of the infecting organisms (viruses or bacteria) are picked up by lymphatic vessels which carry the material to the lymph nodes. Here dendritic cells pick up the material and display it on their cell surfaces for other white (immune) cells, including B and T lymphocytes, to examine.

B and T cells that recognise the antigen being presented then begin to multiply, which is why the lymph nodes swell up - they become filled with dividing cells. At the same time the dividing cells communicate amongst themselves by secreting hormones called cytokines, which are also responsible for the flu-like symptoms (fever, lethargy, aching muscles) that accompany most infections.

Chris
 

Offline kdlynn

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swollen glands... what, where, and why?
« Reply #3 on: 16/09/2007 04:49:57 »
thank you. so if i'm thinking correctly, the swelling indicates that my body's getting ready to fight the infection?
 

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swollen glands... what, where, and why?
« Reply #3 on: 16/09/2007 04:49:57 »

 

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