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Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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The most reactive element
« on: 23/09/2007 22:32:53 »
Is it true that francium is the most reactive element. The Alkili metals are very reactive but im not sure if they are the most unstable, for example, could Uuo and above on the periodic table be more reactive?


 

Offline lightarrow

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The most reactive element
« Reply #1 on: 24/09/2007 15:14:27 »
Is it true that francium is the most reactive element. The Alkili metals are very reactive but im not sure if they are the most unstable, for example, could Uuo and above on the periodic table be more reactive?
Reactive in which sense? With air at room temperature? Or in the sense that reacts with the greatest number of elements? In the last case it should be Fluorine.
There has been other threads on it:
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7992.0
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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The most reactive element
« Reply #2 on: 24/09/2007 23:57:01 »
At about 70 degree ferenhite, and just in water

I'm pretty sure its francium, fluorine is much more stable, the electron rings are 2,7 so it only needs one more to be a noble gas, which are the least reactive of all the elements and francium is 2,8,18,32,18,1 therefore it has more electrons, and is missing 7 on its last ring, so to become stable it would need another 7 electrons, making it a very very reactive element.
« Last Edit: 25/09/2007 00:19:05 by Quantum_Vaccuum »
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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The most reactive element
« Reply #3 on: 25/09/2007 00:18:55 »
and also, another question, would the Buo series be very reactive (atomic number 210-218) it is still an undiscovered element, but since it is so unstable, would that create an extremely reactive element?
 

Offline DrDick

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The most reactive element
« Reply #4 on: 25/09/2007 17:34:35 »
Well, Uuo would definitely NOT be as reactive as Fr, since it would fall in the same column as the noble gases.  It will end up being a nonreactive radioactive gas, similar to radon, with a boiling point of about 260 K (-13 C)

Element 119 (Uue), on the other hand, would be much like francium, but more reactive.

Of course, getting your hands on any francium is almost as difficult as getting any ununennium (Uue), since the longest-lived isotope of francium has a half-life of only 22 minutes, and it's been estimated that there's only about 30 g of Fr on the earth at any one time.

Dick
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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The most reactive element
« Reply #5 on: 26/09/2007 00:04:46 »
and isn't it also illegal to have francium?
 

Offline Bored chemist

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The most reactive element
« Reply #6 on: 26/09/2007 19:42:37 »
Why?
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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The most reactive element
« Reply #7 on: 26/09/2007 23:37:53 »
i guess it isn't i consulted with one of my friends, its just very very rare to find francium
 

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The most reactive element
« Reply #7 on: 26/09/2007 23:37:53 »

 

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