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Author Topic: sweating in space  (Read 2446 times)

paul.fr

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sweating in space
« on: 25/09/2007 08:59:30 »
Do astronaughts sweat whilst in space? i would think that this would cause them to get rather cold in a spacesuit, how is this overcome?


 

Offline daveshorts

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sweating in space
« Reply #1 on: 25/09/2007 10:51:20 »
I would have thought that the humidity inside the the space suit will go up to a point where the sweat doesn't evaporate. So a bigger problem will be overheating. I think spacesuits have lots of tubes in them to pump water to cool or warm you up depending on whether you are in the shade or the sun.
 

lyner

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sweating in space
« Reply #2 on: 26/09/2007 23:47:36 »
Air conditioning rules in space.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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sweating in space
« Reply #3 on: 13/10/2007 13:22:56 »
Even though the space suits have heating and cooling systems in them,http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/educators/resources/spacesuit/temp_suit.asp

Another problem in space is keeping warm. Metabolism appears to be affected along with circulation and many other age related problems are vastly accelerated by the centrifugal force which maintains orbit around the Earth. Not a reduction in gravity as such but a counter measure against gravity. Microgravity is a term used to describe this environment.

Edward L. Robinson, Charles A. Fuller
1Section of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616-8519, USA


Abstract

Gravity appears to alter thermoregulation through changes in both the regulated level of body temperature and the rhythmic organization of temperature regulation. Gravity has been hypothesized to have an associated metabolic cost. Increased resting energy expenditure and dietary intake have been observed in animals during centrifuge experiments at hypergravity. Thus far, only animals have shown a corresponding reduction in metabolism in microgravity. Altered heat loss has been proposed as a response to altered gravitational environments, but remains documented only as changes in skin temperature. Changes in circadian timing, including the body temperature rhythm, have been shown in both hypergravity and microgravity, and probably contribute to alterations in sleep and performance. Changes in body temperature regulation may result from circadian disturbance, from the direct or indirect actions of gravity on the regulated temperature, or from changes in thermoregulatory effectors (heat production and heat loss) due to altered gravitational load and convective changes. To date, however, we have little data on the underlying thermoregulatory changes in altered gravity, and thus the precise mechanisms by which gravity alters temperature regulation remain largely unknown.
 

Offline neilep

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sweating in space
« Reply #4 on: 13/10/2007 18:09:29 »
If I was in space and saw the earth for the first time from orbit I'd probably say " ****me that's awesome ".....Oh sorry !!...SweaTing in space !!..DOH !!! ;)
 

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sweating in space
« Reply #4 on: 13/10/2007 18:09:29 »

 

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