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Author Topic: What is in a golf ball and how does it effect the balls action?  (Read 3582 times)

Offline Karen W.

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Well here it is!




Here is a inside.. what makes them fly across the course with such ease?




I found this picture but cannot read its layed ingredients! and still don't know why it flys with such ease and if it has to do with the inside filling? Have Golf balls always been made like this or not? If not what were they made of in the past?
« Last Edit: 27/09/2007 14:16:33 by Karen W. »


 

Offline lightarrow

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The nucleus is heavy to give it more mass (and so, more momentum, at a given speed, and so to make it travel longer); the outer syntetic material, to give it elasticity when you hit it; the holes in its surface to reduce air friction.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Dimples reduce friction,the cover gives elasticity when you hit it,the center is heavier for weight etc. giing it momentum so it does not work like a ping pong ball!

So what material do you suppose is inside to give it weight or mass? Has it always been the same? Is it differently made by different countries?
 

Offline lightarrow

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So what material do you suppose is inside to give it weight or mass? Has it always been the same? Is it differently made by different countries?
It seems impossible but in the past they also contained feathers! Read here:
http://searchwarp.com/swa31755.htm
 

Offline Karen W.

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feathers???? Cool Thanks Alberto!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Quotes from
http://searchwarp.com/swa31755.htm

"It was on 1618 that the feather golf ball was finally introduced."

"This was commonly known as the "Featherie". This feather golf ball was a handcrafted ball made with goose feathers securely pressed into a horse or cowhide sphere. This is being done while the ball is still wet. After drying, the leather shrank and the feathers expanded creating a hardened ball."


"Next came the Guttie golf ball. This prehistoric kind of golf ball was made from the rubber like sap of the Gutta tree that can be found in the tropics. Normally, these Guttie balls can be easily shaped into a sphere when hot and eventually used as a golf ball. With its rubber nature, guttie balls can be cheaply reproduced and can be easily repaired by reheating and reshaping. However, between the two earliest forms of golf balls, the feather golf ball was said to travel farther than the gutties. This is due to the smooth surface of the gutties that limits the capacity of the golf ball to cover more distance."

Then came these!

"the developers of golf ball finally came up with balls with the "dimples" that are predominant in modern golf balls nowadays. Dimples are crafted into golf balls so as to reduce the aerodynamic drag, which will be acting on the ball if it were totally smooth. This is because smooth balls, when sailing through the air, leave a huge pocket of low-pressure air in its stir therefore creating a drag. With the application of drag, the ball slows down. Hence, by having dimples on golf balls, the pressure differential goes down and the drag force is reduced. These dimples create turbulence in the air surrounding the golf ball. This, in turn, forces the air to clasp the golf ball more closely. By doing so, the air trails the warp created by the ball towards the back instead of flowing past it. This results to a smaller wake and lesser drag. Dimples also help players to put backspin on a shot making the golf ball break off on the putting green."

"William Taylor applied the dimple pattern to a Haskell ball in 1905, golf balls finally took their modern form. From then on, dimpled golf balls were officially used in every golf tournament. In 1921, the golf balls took its form with standard size and weight. Today, there is an abundant selection of golf balls to fit different golf game and condition. There are golf balls that offer control, while some offer distance. In whatever ways golf balls vary, only one thing is common and known. Golf balls are not just elements of the sports arena they are more than ever paradigm of a concept in physics."

Alberto the link is great thanks for the information!

 

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