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Author Topic: Supersymmetric particles & forces  (Read 2298 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Supersymmetric particles & forces
« on: 01/10/2007 16:36:52 »
I've read quite a lot about supersymmetric particles, so I've got a pretty good idea what they are theorised to be. But nowhere have I found any reference to which forces, if any, the supersymmetric partners are subject to. Does anyone have any information about this?


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Supersymmetric particles & forces
« Reply #1 on: 01/10/2007 23:12:14 »
As far as I know the forces between the supersymmetric particles are of exactly the same type as we are familiar with but they probably have much greater masses.  Most of them are expected to decay very rapidly to conventional particles  It is considered possible that one of these particles may be stable only interact through gravity and be a constituent of dark matter  the sneutrino would be a boson ans would fit this job.  Other theories talk of "Sterile"  neutrinos
 

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« Reply #2 on: 02/10/2007 07:13:13 »
Supermassive sneutrinos are intriguing. If the theory is correct and there are as many of those as there are ordinary neutrinos, wouldn't travelling through space be like trying to wade through porridge? Even though they only interact weakly, their increased mass would possibly make gravity relevant; and the sheer number of them would surely cause detectable effects.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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« Reply #3 on: 02/10/2007 19:44:08 »
That is exactly what Dark matter is all about!  Some sort of particle that exists and is only detectable by its gravity.  Such particles are almost impossible to detect individually.  There is an experiment that is currently going on about a mile deep in a Phosphate mine in North Yorkshire that is trying to detect the occasional recoils from nuclear particles when they are occasionally (and very rarely) "hit" by one of these massive particles.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Reply #4 on: 02/10/2007 19:57:33 »
That is exactly what Dark matter is all about!  Some sort of particle that exists and is only detectable by its gravity.  Such particles are almost impossible to detect individually.  There is an experiment that is currently going on about a mile deep in a Phosphate mine in North Yorkshire that is trying to detect the occasional recoils from nuclear particles when they are occasionally (and very rarely) "hit" by one of these massive particles.

So are sneutrinos what are sometimes called WIMPS? Or are they something different?
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Supersymmetric particles & forces
« Reply #5 on: 03/10/2007 07:52:12 »
There are lots of different names for potential dark matter particles depending on exactly which particle family they belong to.  WIMPS stands for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles.
This is a bit ambiguous because it could include massive particles that are subject to the weak interaction (like neutrinos) as well as gravity which is the weakest interaction.

Dark matter can be either hot, warm or cold  (or a combination of all three)depending on how fast the particles are going.  The temperature of the particles determines the size of the groups in which they can aggregate in the hotter the bigger.  Dark matter is only seen on the scale of galaxies and possibly globular clusters and does not appear to form small lumps like star clusters or stars.  In order to condense that small (and form large concentrated gravitiational fields, matter has to slow right down and become very cold but gravitiational interactions alone loose so little energy to do this will take many orders of magnitide greater time than the current age of the universe.
 

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Supersymmetric particles & forces
« Reply #6 on: 03/10/2007 10:26:04 »
I was reading that at first it was thought that hot dark matter could not exist, but that some new mechanism had been theorised by which it could be a possibility.
 

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Supersymmetric particles & forces
« Reply #6 on: 03/10/2007 10:26:04 »

 

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