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Author Topic: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?  (Read 28534 times)

another_someone

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #25 on: 08/10/2007 19:49:05 »
btw, there is a clear distinction between drinking bottled water and other bottled stuff in that there is no alternative with fruit juice. You could keep a cow for milk, I suppose.

I am very surprised that nobody has suggested that I should press my own juices.
 

Offline pirunner

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #26 on: 09/10/2007 00:45:26 »
Well there is quite obviously always going to be an alternative to bottling anything. After all, people did drink before plastic was first produced. Juice COULD be freshly pressed, a cow COULD be kept on hand, your COULD have a distillery in your basement.....but there is also a fine line between helping the environment and convenience or cost effectiveness. I believe that this convenience factor is different for everyone due to the different situations and lifestyles that people have. So... I think that as long as people make a conscious effort to conserve WHEN THEY CAN, we will be off to a good start. The biggest problem currently, however, is the fact that the fast majority of people do not even conserve or recycle when they have that option available. 
 

paul.fr

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #27 on: 11/11/2007 00:33:23 »
from NPR

Quote
posted by Ira Flatow on Thursday, October 11. 2007
Sometimes the facts speak for themselves. Here are some about bottled water, via the American Museum of Natural History in New York. My favorite, is the last one...


Bottled water may be a healthy and increasingly common alternative
to soft drinks, but the plastic bottle turns out to have a hidden dark side:
energy consumption, waste disposal, and other environmental concerns. As
bottled water grows in popularity, these problems also proliferate.

. Worldwide, bottled water consumption nearly doubled between 1997 and 2005,
with U.S. residents tipping back the largest share-nearly 26 gallons per
person in 2005.

. Bottled water costs as much as $10 per gallon for bottled water compared
to less than a penny per gallon for tap water.

. It takes three liters of water to produce a one-liter bottle of water.

. Worldwide, 2.7 million tons of plastic are used each year to make water
bottles, but in the U.S., less than 20 percent of these bottles are
recycled.

. The total estimated energy needed to make, transport, and dispose of one
bottle of water is equivalent to filling the same bottle one-quarter full of
oil.

. An estimated 40 percent of bottled water sold in the U.S. is just filtered
tap water.

To learn more about water-where it comes from, how it shapes the
planet and the lives of people, plants, and animals everywhere-visit the
special exhibition Water: H2O = Life at the American Museum of Natural
History, November 3, 2007, through May 26, 2008. For more information visit
www.amnh.org.

« Last Edit: 11/11/2007 00:43:13 by paul.fr »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #28 on: 11/11/2007 08:43:53 »
That was an interesting video also. That paper seemed odd. Wouldn't you think it would be hard to use ink on.. you now how sometimes ink does not want to write on plastic or metal products.. It is interesting but she said it is tougher! I wonder if they can recycle it again after its used the second time round.. did you catch weather they can do that a second time! and if so what kind of breakdown in the quality would you see each time the product has been recycled and made anew into a new product?
 

Offline pirunner

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #29 on: 12/11/2007 00:36:55 »
I love the facts! Recently, the science club in my school posted a series of signs around the school with recycling info on them. I have decided to do the same with bottled water facts. These facts should help!....I didn't catch a video. Could you paste a link? Thanks!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #30 on: 12/11/2007 01:42:51 »
http://www.sciencefriday.com/videos/watch/17
from Pauls Npr post!

Watch the video on green packaging they talk a little about some interesting products!
 

Offline pirunner

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #31 on: 08/12/2007 03:30:37 »
I have recently purchased a Sigg aluminum water bottle that I refill several times a day while I am at school. It is 1 liter (or litre if you prefer-by the way, what's the deal with that-it's not even pronounced like that in Britain)and very lightweight and durable. Prior to this I have always used reusable plastic bottles, which ALWAY gave my water a funny taste now matter what number plastic I would use. This really proved to me that all of chemicals leeching into my water were NOT being made up. Anyway, I love my new bottle and think it's a great step toward good green living.
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #32 on: 08/12/2007 21:42:19 »
Go you!  ;D
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #33 on: 09/12/2007 04:49:01 »
Thats cool but is there still any truth in the aluminum and Alzheimer's connection?
« Last Edit: 09/12/2007 15:28:59 by Karen W. »
 

another_someone

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #34 on: 09/12/2007 14:11:58 »
Thats cool but is there still and truth in the aluminum and Alzheimer's connection?

What is without doubt is that consuming large quantities of aluminium can cause mental degeneration akin to Alzheimer’s, but aluminium is a common element in the environment, and what is not clear is what the effects of long term low level exposure might be (i.e. are the observed effects due to poisoning with an acute overdose, but perfectly safe at low levels?).

http://www.guardian.co.uk/medicine/story/0,,1757171,00.html
Quote
Leading scientists called for a fresh inquiry into the effect of Britain's worst large-scale water poisoning yesterday after providing the first evidence to suggest it caused the death of a woman from an extremely rare form of Alzheimer's.

Research published yesterday suggests Carole Cross's neurological illness and subsequent death could have been brought on by the 1988 Camelford incident, in which 20 tonnes of highly toxic aluminium sulphate was added to drinking water at a treatment works by mistake.

 Up to 20,000 people were exposed to concentrations of aluminium up to 3,000 times the legal limit but, despite three inquiries, there has been no systematic monitoring of residents.

Now Chris Exley, the lead author of research published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, and Professor Daniel Perl, an authority on Alzheimer's and aluminium, are calling for the Camelford residents to be monitored after finding that Mrs Cross had more than 20 times the normal level of aluminium in her brain. She also suffered from a rare type of Alzheimer's, sporadic early onset beta amyloid angiopathy, which would not be expected in someone with no genetic predisposition to it.

"This may be a one-off, although it is highly unlikely, " said Dr Exley, reader in bioinorganic chemistry at Keele University. "We need to set up a monitoring programme of the people so we can put their minds at rest."

The scientist, who conducted the research with Professor Margaret Esiri of Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, added: "There has to be an element of risk [to other residents] before we discover this. This can't be explained away easily."

Mrs Cross and her husband, Doug, were living in the small north Cornwall town in July 1988 when a driver tipped the aluminium sulphate into the wrong tank at the water treatment works at Lowermoor, on the edge of Bodmin Moor. She tried to avoid drinking the water but realised she had been exposed when she took a bath which turned blue when she added soap to it. "Like a lot of people in Camelford, she refused to talk of it. She found it too traumatic," Mr Cross said yesterday.

In May 2003, at the age of 58, she was referred to a neurologist for headaches, difficulties in finding words and doing sums, and hallucinations. Her condition worsened and she died in April 2004.

An inquest into her death was adjourned in December last year, after the West Somerset coroner, Michael Rose - persuaded by Mr Cross, who refused to accept that she had died of an unknown neurological condition - called in the scientists to examine her brain.

The findings show Mrs Cross - who had no family history of Alzheimer's - had up to 23 micrograms of aluminium per gram of brain in parts of her brain compared with the normal concentration of two micrograms. Aluminium, which is a neurotoxin, has previously been associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's. Dr Exley told the Guardian that Mrs Cross may have reached her toxic threshold for aluminium at 58. "There is nothing in her lifestyle to suggest abnormal exposure other than a period of weeks and months in 1988, when she was exposed to high levels of aluminium."

Mr Cross, an environmental scientist and member of the sub-group of the Commons committee on toxicity set up to look at the effects of the incident, said the findings sent out a "frightening message to people living in Camelford today".

"There is a cover-up going on. I know of up to 20 deaths that can't really be explained. We have been demanding testing for 18 years. It is absolutely essential."
 

Offline pirunner

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #35 on: 09/12/2007 15:23:40 »
Sigg bottles are coated on the inside with a non-leeching protective layer. 100% effective might I add-in theory and in practice. I noticed that difference on my first sip!

check out Sigg.com
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #36 on: 09/12/2007 15:30:45 »
Thanks George and pirunner. that is good information to have! very interesting. I like the coating idea!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #37 on: 09/12/2007 15:32:08 »
btw, there is a clear distinction between drinking bottled water and other bottled stuff in that there is no alternative with fruit juice. You could keep a cow for milk, I suppose.

I am very surprised that nobody has suggested that I should press my own juices.

LOL LOL You should George, its the healthy thing to do.. I love fresh squeezed orange juice!
 

another_someone

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #38 on: 09/12/2007 15:42:01 »
I love fresh squeezed orange juice!

So do I, I just don't like making it.
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #39 on: 10/12/2007 13:47:52 »
But you don't. Not really.
Just take some fuit *) and chuck it into the machine. All you need to do is press a button.
Surely you're not too lazy for that?
 ;)









*)peeled and washed of course, cough
 ;D maybe *there*'s the problem in the first place
 

another_someone

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #40 on: 10/12/2007 14:27:43 »
But you don't. Not really.
Just take some fuit *) and chuck it into the machine. All you need to do is press a button.
Surely you're not too lazy for that?
 ;)

I used to have an electric press (got given it as a present).  Liked the idea, but it kept leaking everywhere, so threw it out.  Now only have hand presses, which are bothersome.

Aside from that, my kitchen not being large enough to the surfeit of gadgets I would like to own - which is why I ended up giving my very nice food processor to my half-sister - technically on long term loan, for some good number of years.
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #41 on: 10/12/2007 16:42:59 »

I used to have an electric press (got given it as a present).  Liked the idea, but it kept leaking everywhere, so threw it out. 


Ack, too bad. Those presses are great and all yours would have probably needed was an o-ring replacement.



As to a not spacious enough kitchen, now that's NO excuse



These things are not very big, just tall  ;D and work even during blackouts  ;D ;D
 

paul.fr

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #42 on: 10/12/2007 16:51:38 »
Green packaging was mentioned earlier in this topic. I heard some guy (code for loon) talking abot green christmas wrappings, his suggestion was to wrap all your presents in old clothes and newspaper.

yes i can see it now...here you go wifey, with her christmas present wrapped up in an old pair of boxer shorts!
 

Offline pirunner

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #43 on: 11/12/2007 02:25:19 »
I love that idea!

Okay, maybe not the boxers, but newspaper would be all right. I think it would send a strong message and educate kids in a good way.
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #44 on: 11/12/2007 03:00:18 »
I've used newspapers many times to wrap gifts.  Even made pretty bows out of newspapers.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #45 on: 11/12/2007 04:46:25 »
I like to blend the newspaper up add some glue etc and maybe a little bit of recycled lawn clippings take a large window screen or paper screen if you have one and make large sheets of paper I have used my food dehydrator screens with a nice thin fabric for draining and drying to male my own paper. You can sponge paint it a dribble shiny golds reds and silver metallic colors to the paint and use a feather to spread the accents.. it makes lovely wrapping paper!

Also some potato chip bags are that shiny silver inside and after cleaning can be turned inside out for beautiful shiny silver gift bags that you can tie with lovely satin ribbons or your choice bows!

Small brown  or white lunch bags are lovely stamped and tied with raffia for gift bags. Save the used clean ones you get from a store with say a single bottle etc.

You can also bake with your metal pan inside a brown paper sac in your microwave without hurting the microwave. My mom showed me how to do that!. Brown heavy grocery bags with the ends sealed or folded over no holes.

 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #46 on: 11/12/2007 04:47:48 »
I love fresh squeezed orange juice!

So do I, I just don't like making it.

I don't mind if they are good juicy oranges or other fruits. I have never had a juicer but seriously have been eyeballing one.
 

Offline ericN

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #47 on: 19/06/2014 09:40:17 »
There have been arguments over banning bottled water. The city of Concord, Mass. was the very first city to prohibit bottled water in the United States, while other towns followed the move. The main purpose of the campaign is to cut down Dasani bottles in dumps.
« Last Edit: 20/06/2014 23:52:35 by peppercorn »
 

Offline alancalverd

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #48 on: 20/06/2014 07:45:13 »
Concord, Mass is the only town I've ever felt at home in. And now I know why - it's full of sensible people!

Thanks to Roman military engineering, bottled water is a con in an urban civilisation. It generally costs more than beer, which is made from the same stuff plus a whole lot of delicious and nutritious additives. The problem is that politicians then complain that beer is too cheap, not that water is too expensive. On an open-label taste test, people always prefer the bottle with the most expensive label even when they all contain tap water. A local farmer stopped growing food a few years ago when he discovered how much money he could make just bottling the water from his well instead of using it to grow anything. 

I don't generally advocate the use of laws and by-laws to protect people from their own stupidity, but the good burghers of Concord have added the excuse of environmental contamination to a sensible piece of public education.
 

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Re: Should Plastic bottled water be banned?
« Reply #48 on: 20/06/2014 07:45:13 »

 

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