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Author Topic: Kno3  (Read 3190 times)

Offline chewwcheww

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Kno3
« on: 09/10/2007 04:30:13 »
I'm trying to make kno3 (saltpeter), can i mix a granular fertilizer together to come out with kno2? something like a 0-0-60, and a 31-0-0,or 15-0-0?? m trying to make a smoke mix for some fun. kno3 and sugar.
thank you,
 sam
« Last Edit: 09/10/2007 04:59:35 by chewwcheww »


 

another_someone

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Re: Kno3
« Reply #1 on: 09/10/2007 04:53:56 »
I thought saltpetre was KNO3 (nitrate not nitrite).
 

Offline chewwcheww

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Re: Kno3
« Reply #2 on: 09/10/2007 04:59:02 »
yes i think your right, im sry..
 

Offline eric l

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Kno3
« Reply #3 on: 09/10/2007 10:38:44 »
Trying to prepare salpeter (KNO3) from granulated fertilizers is working backwards :  most granulated fertilizers are blends containing salpeter (and various other components).
Neither will you ever obtain salpeter from mixing dry components.  At least you will have to dissolve them all in water, and next try to separate the different components.
 

another_someone

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Kno3
« Reply #4 on: 09/10/2007 14:38:34 »
I understand why chewwcheww spells it 'saltpeter', as that is the American spelling, but Eric, I am surprised that you use the same spelling.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltpetre
Quote
Its common names include saltpetre (from Medieval Latin sal petrae: "stone salt" or possibly "Salt of Petra"), American English saltpeter, Nitrate of potash and nitre.
 

Offline eric l

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Kno3
« Reply #5 on: 09/10/2007 15:40:40 »
I understand why chewwcheww spells it 'saltpeter', as that is the American spelling, but Eric, I am surprised that you use the same spelling.


Well, I had written "salpeter" but the Spell Check insisted on "saltpeter" - still, I thought I had pushed the "Ignore All" button.  In fact, I remember both spellings being found in textbooks.

 

Offline chewwcheww

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Kno3
« Reply #6 on: 10/10/2007 04:26:55 »
In a fertilizer that is containing ''saltpeter''.. yes I'm American. what would the blend be? ?-0-?

-Sammy
 

Offline eric l

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Kno3
« Reply #7 on: 10/10/2007 10:20:07 »
The numbers are the "NPK-rating" where
  • N stands for the percentage of nitrogen, expressed as nitrogen
  • P stands for the percentage of phosphorous, expressed as P2O5
  • K stands for the percentage of potassium, expressed as K2O
Pure saltpetre or KNO3 would rate something like 14-0-80

("Salpeter" the way I wrote it is actually the German and Dutch (and Norvegian...) spelling.  We used textbooks in many languages, and many of the European standards have their origin in German (DIN) stndards, hence the confusion.
 

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Kno3
« Reply #7 on: 10/10/2007 10:20:07 »

 

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