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Author Topic: How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.  (Read 5360 times)

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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There is a whole table of undiscovered elements, how do scientests know that those exsist?

And a second question: how do scientests create new atoms?


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #1 on: 10/10/2007 21:58:15 »
In theory there are an infinite number of elements (I think). Just keep adding more nucleons & electrons. It's not actually as simple as that, and many of the trans-uranic elements are unstable, but I don't know of any reason why it shouldn't be possible to create them. Maybe our bored chemist can explain it better.
 

another_someone

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #2 on: 10/10/2007 22:08:43 »
In theory there are an infinite number of elements (I think). Just keep adding more nucleons & electrons. It's not actually as simple as that, and many of the trans-uranic elements are unstable, but I don't know of any reason why it shouldn't be possible to create them. Maybe our bored chemist can explain it better.

Some people have described a neutron star as the biggest atom ever - although I think there are inaccuracies in that description.
 

Offline Quantum_Vaccuum

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #3 on: 11/10/2007 05:38:03 »
Nuetron star?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #4 on: 11/10/2007 16:47:12 »
In theory there are an infinite number of elements (I think). Just keep adding more nucleons & electrons. It's not actually as simple as that, and many of the trans-uranic elements are unstable, but I don't know of any reason why it shouldn't be possible to create them. Maybe our bored chemist can explain it better.

Some people have described a neutron star as the biggest atom ever - although I think there are inaccuracies in that description.

Yes, it does seem to be somewhat stretching the definition of an atom; although, I suppose, there are similarities.
 

another_someone

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #5 on: 12/10/2007 13:18:53 »
Nuetron star?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuetron_star
Quote
A neutron star is formed from the collapsed remnant of a massive star, a Type II, Type Ib, or Type Ic supernova and models predict that it consists mostly of neutrons. It is a cold star supported by the Pauli exclusion principle repulsion between neutrons. A neutron star is one of the few possible conclusions of stellar evolution.

A typical neutron star has a mass between 1.35 and about 2.1 solar masses, with a corresponding radius between 20 and 10 km — 30,000 to 70,000 times smaller than the Sun. Thus, neutron stars have densities of 8×1013 to 2×1015 g/cm³, about the density of an atomic nucleus.

In general, compact stars of less than 1.44 solar masses, the Chandrasekhar limit, are white dwarfs; above 2 to 3 solar masses (the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff limit), a Quark star might be created, however this is uncertain. Gravitational collapse will always occur on any star over 5 solar masses, inevitably producing a black hole.

In other words, when a star runs out of fuel, and thus collapses in on itself, if it is just a little too light to collapse all the way to a black hole, or becomes a neutron star (a neutron star causes protons and electrons within atoms to merge to become neutrons - hence its name).
« Last Edit: 12/10/2007 13:21:25 by another_someone »
 

another_someone

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #6 on: 12/10/2007 13:23:46 »
Some people have described a neutron star as the biggest atom ever - although I think there are inaccuracies in that description.

Yes, it does seem to be somewhat stretching the definition of an atom; although, I suppose, there are similarities.

Aside from the fact that it supposedly has no protons (although I don't think it is proven that it does not have even a single proton), but the main difference is that it is held together by gravitational force rather than colour force.  On the other hand, it has the approximate density of an atomic nucleus.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #7 on: 12/10/2007 14:22:49 »
Wouldn't it be held together by gravity and the colour force? Surely the colour force would still act because of the quarks inside the neutrons.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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« Last Edit: 12/10/2007 14:30:45 by DoctorBeaver »
 

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How do sceintests know about Undiscovered elements.
« Reply #8 on: 12/10/2007 14:24:56 »

 

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