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Author Topic: gravitomagnetics  (Read 2770 times)

Offline Mr Andrew

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gravitomagnetics
« on: 13/10/2007 16:21:16 »
I haven't read much about this subject but as I understand it, a moving mass generates a corresponding gravitomagnetic field, similar to how moving charges generate magnetic fields.  How fast would a mass have to move to generate a significant gravitomagnetic field?  Obviously it is dependent on the size of the mass...could it be done in a laboratory or would larger objects be needed?  Does the effect only come into play on a cosmic scale?  I am so helplessly ignorant on this subject.


 

Offline Bored chemist

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« Last Edit: 13/10/2007 17:04:02 by Bored chemist »
 

Offline Mr Andrew

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gravitomagnetics
« Reply #2 on: 14/10/2007 03:39:37 »
I read those.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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gravitomagnetics
« Reply #3 on: 16/10/2007 22:35:19 »
There is an amazingly precise gravitational probe orbiting the earth that is measuring this gravitomagnetic effect at the moment  this is currently coming up with reports that match theory.

Gravity is such a weak force that significant gravitomagnetic effects only occur at velocities close to the velocity of light and very heavy bodies
 

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gravitomagnetics
« Reply #3 on: 16/10/2007 22:35:19 »

 

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