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Author Topic: Bacteria..are really small....where do they come from ?  (Read 2826 times)

Offline neilep

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If Bacteria are single celled and the most simplest forms of life....then...where do they come from ?


 

another_someone

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Bacteria..are really small....where do they come from ?
« Reply #1 on: 25/10/2007 17:31:13 »
If Bacteria are single celled and the most simplest forms of life....then...where do they come from ?

They are generally regarded as the simplest organism that is classified as life, but they are not the simplest of organisms (although simplest is not necessarily the same as most primitive).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_evolution
Quote
DateEvent
4567.17 MaThe planet Earth forms from the accretion disc revolving around the young Sun.
4533 MaThe planet Earth and the planet Theia collide, sending countless moonlets into orbit around the young Earth. These moonlets eventually coalesce to form the Moon. The gravitational pull of the new Moon stabilises the Earth's fluctuating axis of rotation and sets up the conditions for the formation of life.
4100 MaThe surface of the Earth cools enough for the crust to solidify. The atmosphere and the oceans form.
Between 4500 and 2500 MaThe earliest life appears, possibly derived from self-reproducing RNA molecules. The replication of these organisms requires resources like energy, space, and smaller building blocks, which soon become limited, resulting in competition. Natural selection favours those molecules which are more efficient at replication. DNA molecules then take over as the main replicators. They soon develop inside enclosing membranes which provide a stable physical and chemical environment conducive to their replication: proto-cells.
3900 MaLate Heavy Bombardment: peak rate of impact events upon the inner planets by meteors. This constant disturbance probably obliterated any life that had already evolved, as the oceans boiled away completely; conversely, life may have been transported to Earth by a meteor.
Somewhere between 3900 - 2500 MaCells resembling prokaryotes appear. These first organisms are chemoautotrophs: they use carbon dioxide as a carbon source and oxidize inorganic materials to extract energy. Later, prokaryotes evolve glycolysis, a set of chemical reactions that free the energy of organic molecules such as glucose. Glycolysis generates ATP molecules as short-term energy currency, and ATP continue to be used in almost all organisms, unchanged, to this day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaea
Quote
A phylogenetic tree based on rRNA data, showing the separation of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryote.An alternative tree based on the model of neomuran evolution from eubacteria. LUCA: Last Universal Common Ancestor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_life#Current_models
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There is no truly "standard model" of the origin of life. But most currently accepted models build in one way or another upon a number of discoveries about the origin of molecular and cellular components for life, which are listed in a rough order of postulated emergence:
    1. Plausible pre-biotic conditions result in the creation of certain basic small molecules (monomers) of life, such as amino acids. This was demonstrated in the Miller-Urey experiment by Stanley L. Miller and Harold C. Urey in 1953.

    2. Phospholipids (of an appropriate length) can spontaneously form lipid bilayers, a basic component of the cell membrane.

    3. The polymerization of nucleotides into random RNA molecules might have resulted in self-replicating ribozymes (RNA world hypothesis).

    4. Selection pressures for catalytic efficiency and diversity result in ribozymes which catalyse peptidyl transfer (hence formation of small proteins), since oligopeptides complex with RNA to form better catalysts. Thus the first ribosome is born, and protein synthesis becomes more prevalent.

    5. Proteins outcompete ribozymes in catalytic ability, and therefore become the dominant biopolymer. Nucleic acids are restricted to predominantly genomic use.
 

Offline neilep

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Bacteria..are really small....where do they come from ?
« Reply #2 on: 25/10/2007 19:11:00 »
THANKS FOR ALL THE wonderful information George !

 

Offline Alandriel

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Bacteria..are really small....where do they come from ?
« Reply #3 on: 25/10/2007 20:40:15 »

Quote from: George the wise
...4533 Ma The planet Earth and the planet Theia collide, sending countless moonlets into orbit around the young Earth. These moonlets eventually coalesce to form the Moon. The gravitational pull of the new Moon stabilises the Earth's fluctuating axis of rotation and sets up the conditions for the formation of life.

Woa!!!  :oplanet Theia ?!? - makes me wonder on *what* planet I've been for the last 20 years.  ::)

It's a good thing I do stumble across such things as my daughter soon will come home with homework like this and then......... ouch! Seems I've got some catching up to do.


But back on topic. ;D

Bacterias... yes..... hmmm... there's this joke at the tip of my tongue......................................... very annoying!!!

I'm sure Doc Beaver can and will oblige! ;D



But I disgress yet again.

Bacteria

they're gorgous - did you know?? - Beautiful with sometimes deadly consequences....



Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria



Bacillus cerus



Streptomyces



Staphylococcus aureus


Anthrax


 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Bacteria..are really small....where do they come from ?
« Reply #3 on: 25/10/2007 20:40:15 »

 

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