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Offline elegantlywasted

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Calling all smart computer people!!!!
« on: 03/11/2007 02:21:11 »
How do animated gif's work? Is there a way to slow an existing one down? Anyone know how to make them? What exactly is going on in that little file? Please be kind, I have a small knowledge base when it comes to non basic computer stuff.


 

Offline Simulated

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Calling all smart computer people!!!!
« Reply #1 on: 03/11/2007 02:46:50 »
Oh them are the only things I haven't really gotten into. They will teach me when I'm a Junior. i shoudl jsut ask the teacher, but yeha. Sorrys!
 

another_someone

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« Reply #2 on: 03/11/2007 02:56:50 »
There are a number of image compression standards around, each with there own strengths and weaknesses.

One of the earlier compression algorithms was the GIF format, originally introduced by CompuServe (now part of AOL).  It was a very crude compression, using the LZW algorithm (which then ran foul of patent law, but the law was never actually enforced - but that is another story) and the standard only had support from a limited number of colour (256, if I recall).  Both these limitations lead to the development of the PNG standard, which was free of patents, and allowed about 4 billion colours.

One unusual feature of the GIF standard was that it allowed multiple images to be stored in the same file (this feature was not carried over in the PNG standard, and is not in the JPEG standard either, although it exists in the TIFF standard, and there is work in progress to have formats based on PNG and JPEG that support animation), and these multiple images could be shown sequentially as if in a slide show.  If you make the images similar to each other, and then show them in rapid succession, you then have what is a moving image.  I believe the rate of display is encoded in the file, and not under user control.

There are various photo editors that will allow you to edit GIF files, and almost all of them will allow you to handle all of the separate images stored in a GIF file (the animated GIF of the vortex that we were looking at on another thread, I downloaded to my machine, and opened with Serif PhotoPlus, and it contains 10 separate still images, and I can, if I choose edit each of those images separately).
« Last Edit: 03/11/2007 03:11:07 by another_someone »
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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« Reply #3 on: 03/11/2007 03:21:11 »
Awesome thanks!

Is PhotoPlus compatible with macs?
 

another_someone

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« Reply #4 on: 03/11/2007 04:07:37 »
Awesome thanks!

Is PhotoPlus compatible with macs?

PhotoPlus is Windows only, but as I said, I would expect most other decent photo editing packages to achieve the same.

Just checked, and you can use GIMP on an Apple Mac to edit GIFs (or its variant - GIMPshop - which tries to be GIMP with friendlier menus).  Both of these are free (open source) image editors, but they are a bit idiosyncratic.

I'm sure there must be commercial software that would do the same (I am almost certain that PhotoShop must do it, but I am not convinced that Aperture will do it).
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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« Reply #5 on: 03/11/2007 13:01:26 »
awesome! thank you :)
 

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« Reply #5 on: 03/11/2007 13:01:26 »

 

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