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Offline Bass

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Geology Question of the Week
« Reply #125 on: 05/01/2009 21:05:14 »
Glacial erratic.  Looks like something from Canadian Rockies- so my guess would be somewhere in Alberta?  I seem to vaguely remember a whole train of similar erratics that stretched all the way to eastern Montana
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #126 on: 05/01/2009 21:24:45 »
Glacial erratic in Alberta it is!

And, yes, it is part of the Foothills Erratics train, this being the largest in N America I believe.  Its the Okotoks Erratic in Alberta, and is composed of quartzite from the Jasper area in the Canadian Rockies.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #127 on: 09/01/2009 17:16:45 »
OK

MY turn

What is this??

 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #128 on: 09/01/2009 18:30:19 »
Hmmmm....Im gonna say multiple phragmocones from some species of cephalopod...possibly nautiloids?   
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #129 on: 12/01/2009 15:02:32 »
Strait ammonites they are.
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #130 on: 12/01/2009 16:31:55 »
This structure is magnificent!  What is it and how did it form?

 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #131 on: 13/01/2009 03:45:32 »
I can't tell - I already know since you told me yesterday during the Pittsbugh- San Diego football game.
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #132 on: 17/01/2009 23:15:32 »
Being an old spelunker, the stalactites are obvious in the background.  The big moth is intriguing- then I noticed the horizontal growths.  My guess is helictites.  Where is the cave?
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #133 on: 17/01/2009 23:41:38 »
Yep, helictites.  The cave is Sonora Cavern and it is unbelievable.

From Wiki: The founder of the National Speleological Society, Bill Stephenson, said of the cave after his first visit: "This is the most indescribably beautiful cave in the world, its beauty cannot be exaggerated, not even by a Texan."

My wife took me there for my birthday two weeks ago :)  Because it was my birthday and I was a geoscience student, the guide took us into two rooms that are solely reserved for scientists...I was in heaven!

The formation is called "The Butterfly" and is the only known double fishtail helictite in the world.  Unfortunately, some college kids broke off about a third of one of the wings in 2006, but after a little lobbying, the Texas legislature made it a felony to deface a landmark.  Since the guy had never been charged before the law change, he is now charged with a felony. ;D  Dont mess with Texas!
« Last Edit: 18/01/2009 05:32:07 by frethack »
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #134 on: 18/01/2009 00:00:24 »
Gosh, I wish I were that smart.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #135 on: 27/03/2009 05:06:50 »
What is the oldest Fossil life form and how old is it?
« Last Edit: 27/03/2009 08:21:48 by JimBob »
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #136 on: 27/03/2009 05:14:09 »
You? 564412354688886421354 years old? :)
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #137 on: 27/03/2009 05:27:50 »
Bristlecone pine trees? 4600 years?
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #138 on: 27/03/2009 08:20:26 »
You? 564412354688886421354 years old? :)

Oh, was that thing that woke me up the Big Bang? Must mean I am Brahman, the first cause. I open my eye and a universe is created,I close my eye and it ceases to exists.

You know, when you have that much power, you hardly notice it.

NO, I am not the oldest fossil on the earth.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #139 on: 27/03/2009 08:25:24 »
Bristlecone pine trees? 4600 years?

Yes, it is the bristle cone pine as the oldest Living complex life form. I have clarified the question -

What is the oldest known fossil life form and how old is it?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #140 on: 28/03/2009 00:05:17 »
Some sort of cyanobacteria-like fossil?
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #141 on: 29/03/2009 03:46:02 »
Yep, algal mats, not stromatolites, 3.2 billion years old - found in South Africa
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #142 on: 30/03/2009 02:19:42 »
what happened to the 3.4 to 3.5 B cyanobacteria fossils found in the Barberton Greenstone belt in South Africa? 
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #143 on: 30/03/2009 04:04:17 »
They are probably still there. And there is good evidence that they are life forms older than 3.5 years old. This date comes from the greenstone itself and is thus from a metamorphic rock.

But http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1578735

When I ran across this on the BBC web site it was billed as the oldest fossil in existence.

I feel like Eeyore.
Can I take any more?
Thank you, Friend Bass -
You made me an As*

 

Offline Chemistry4me

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« Reply #144 on: 30/03/2009 11:40:02 »
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #145 on: 31/03/2009 23:47:51 »
Take no offense master JBs
I bow before your expertise
As to your poetry, I pass
Cause Eeyore’s already an as*
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #146 on: 01/04/2009 08:33:21 »
This should appeal to the chemists as well.

Why do speleothems grow fastest in dryer winter conditions with low rainfall and low CO2 (g) in the cave atmosphere?

Just had a speleo-climatology lecture today...hehehe
« Last Edit: 01/04/2009 08:36:12 by frethack »
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #147 on: 02/04/2009 04:07:10 »
Why should we care???
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #148 on: 02/04/2009 20:46:51 »
Why should we care???

Because speleothems are used as proxies for rainfall/climate data!  If they are only recording winter/early spring rainfall then we will surely have to rethink how we use them.

Heres the stoichiometry...maybe that will help?

CaCO3 + 2H+ = Ca2+ + H2O + CO2(gas)

 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #149 on: 02/04/2009 21:23:22 »
Does this mean spelunkers will die of carbon dioxide poisoning?
 

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