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Author Topic: Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?  (Read 12606 times)

Offline kdlynn

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #25 on: 25/11/2007 15:36:35 »
oh ok. i was starting to think i had nerve endings of steel or something
 

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #26 on: 05/12/2007 02:08:22 »
http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2005/0508-the_taste_gene.htm
Quote
May 1, 2005 — In the first study to link taste genes to behavior in children, researchers looked at how natural variations in a recently discovered taste gene affected sensitivity to bitter tastes and food preferences in a group of children and adults. Collecting genetic samples from 143 children and their mothers, the researchers showed moms and kids who had at least one bitter-sensitive region in the gene were generally able to detect even a hint of bitter flavor in a test drink. The same group of children, carrying one or two bitter-sensitive regions of a gene, also preferred higher concentrations of sucrose solutions and had stronger preferences for sweet-tasting food and beverages than did the bitter-insensitive kids.

PHILADELPHIA -- If you're a parent, chances are you've had a difficult time getting your child to eat certain veggies. The next time your child pushes away his spinach, it may not be that he's being difficult or picky. A new study finds some children may be extra sensitive to bitter tastes.

Abby Plummer is part of a tasting study that looks at the effect of a bitter-taste receptor gene on food preferences.

"We genotyped children and mothers -- and by genotyping, I mean we took cheek swabs and got DNA from mothers and children -- and looked for the presence of this bitter taste receptor gene," says Julie Mennella, a developmental Psychobiologist at Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

Psycho-biologists, who combine psychology and biology, grouped the 143 children and their mothers into three genotypes: PP, AP or AA. The P signifies the presence of the bitter gene. As expected, those with two bitter genes, PP, were the most sensitive to bitter taste. However, mothers and children with the same genotypes did not have the same taste experience.

Mennella says, "An interesting thing is that children who carried one of these bitter taste alleles were much more sensitive to the bitter taste than mothers."

Which could be why many children have an aversion to bitter foods like certain vegetables. "Childhood may represent a period of heightened bitter taste sensitivity in some children that lessens with age. That's not to say that as you get older you can't taste bitter anymore, it's just a dampening effect," Mennella says. She hopes her research leads to healthier diets for kids.

The study also found children who had the bitter taste gene preferred higher levels of the sucrose solution they were given in the study. Researchers point out that as we age, life experience begins to override genetic disposition for taste.
 

Offline imatfaal

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #27 on: 05/12/2007 18:26:27 »
I heard (note - purely anecdotal) that if you 'force' people who hate blue cheese to eat a piece of blue cheese every day for three weeks that at the end of the period over half of the group will now enjoy blue cheese and will eat it by choice for the rest of their life.  Its not the sort of thing that you could ever test - well you could, but who could be bothered to do a decent regulated test for such a strange theory.
Matthew
 

Offline Carolyn

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #28 on: 05/12/2007 19:12:51 »
http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2005/0508-the_taste_gene.htm
Quote
May 1, 2005 — In the first study to link taste genes to behavior in children, researchers looked at how natural variations in a recently discovered taste gene affected sensitivity to bitter tastes and food preferences in a group of children and adults. Collecting genetic samples from 143 children and their mothers, the researchers showed moms and kids who had at least one bitter-sensitive region in the gene were generally able to detect even a hint of bitter flavor in a test drink. The same group of children, carrying one or two bitter-sensitive regions of a gene, also preferred higher concentrations of sucrose solutions and had stronger preferences for sweet-tasting food and beverages than did the bitter-insensitive kids.

PHILADELPHIA -- If you're a parent, chances are you've had a difficult time getting your child to eat certain veggies. The next time your child pushes away his spinach, it may not be that he's being difficult or picky. A new study finds some children may be extra sensitive to bitter tastes.

Abby Plummer is part of a tasting study that looks at the effect of a bitter-taste receptor gene on food preferences.

"We genotyped children and mothers -- and by genotyping, I mean we took cheek swabs and got DNA from mothers and children -- and looked for the presence of this bitter taste receptor gene," says Julie Mennella, a developmental Psychobiologist at Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

Psycho-biologists, who combine psychology and biology, grouped the 143 children and their mothers into three genotypes: PP, AP or AA. The P signifies the presence of the bitter gene. As expected, those with two bitter genes, PP, were the most sensitive to bitter taste. However, mothers and children with the same genotypes did not have the same taste experience.

Mennella says, "An interesting thing is that children who carried one of these bitter taste alleles were much more sensitive to the bitter taste than mothers."

Which could be why many children have an aversion to bitter foods like certain vegetables. "Childhood may represent a period of heightened bitter taste sensitivity in some children that lessens with age. That's not to say that as you get older you can't taste bitter anymore, it's just a dampening effect," Mennella says. She hopes her research leads to healthier diets for kids.

The study also found children who had the bitter taste gene preferred higher levels of the sucrose solution they were given in the study. Researchers point out that as we age, life experience begins to override genetic disposition for taste.

Thanks George.  That explains a lot! So as it turns out, my daughters immense dislike for veggies may not have been all in her head after all.   I suppose it could also explain why giving her medicine was such a nightmare.  Hmmmm, now I feel kind of guilty for yelling at her about it.
 

Offline Carolyn

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #29 on: 14/01/2008 23:54:05 »

This is what you do !!

Well..actually firstly...YES you can't force yourself to like something ewe don't like but ewe can acclimatise yourself to tolerate it...little and often.....eventually...you'll get used to it....hey.......ewe might even eventually like it....but not in a forced way....

...this happened to me and avocados !!

Ok... in the mean time...this is what ewe do....grab a bunch of celery, grab a few potatoes, grab a few carrots, grab a few onions, (grab any other veggies ewe might wanna add too...peas for instance....especially nice sweet ones !!)..chop the buggers up and fry in olive oil for a few minutes to sweat them...add a fair bit of seasoning ......then....add enough water to cover them....(or vegetable stock)....boil the stuff  for about twenty minutes or more...or until all the veggie are nice and soft.....then..here comes the good bit....grab yourself a blending thingy stick thing (i hope ewe have one)...and whizz all that stuff into a thick soup......taste....add more seasoning if you wish.....ewe really wanna whizz it down completely....
...if ewe do not have a blending thingy stick thing then blend in a blender but ewe might wanna wait for it to cool a little bit...

...what ewe'll have is a soup of health !!!...you can for luxury...add a dollop of cream...but ....whack it in a bowl....and the next day it's even nicer........
..Now , instead of forcing yourself to eat celery...just have a single hot cup of health soup...add some croûtons if you wish...or a piece of bread for dipping !!..

I know it's not raw...BUT...if ewe cook it quickly ewe will still retain a fair bit of goodness...PLUS...ewe can always add fresh veg to it too...peas, beans, shrooms, brocolli....

...it's gotta be done !!!

Thanks for this suggestion!  I made this tonight, expecting to be the only one in the house that would eat it.  Both hubby and son loved it!!!!  Now if I could just figure out how many calories.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #30 on: 15/01/2008 23:48:54 »
I have a problem with this question because I love just about anything that is edible particularly bitter and acid things. Sweet things are OK but nothing to rave about.  It always strikes me as peculier about how people can rave about one food and hate another for example breast meat and leg meat on a chicken when I find them basically very similar and nice with the leg meat being slightly more tasty.

By the way the soup sounds pretty good and similar to the sort of stuff we have several days a week but I like the veg raw as well
« Last Edit: 15/01/2008 23:50:56 by Soul Surfer »
 

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Can we talk ourselves into liking a certain food?
« Reply #30 on: 15/01/2008 23:48:54 »

 

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