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Author Topic: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?  (Read 13687 times)

Offline CerealKiIer

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Hi. I am wondering if there is any possible way of getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark. Like litteraly see in the dark.Or if there is anyway of having your human eyes exchanged for a cats eyes. Not a household cat but a bigger cat.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2004 16:49:49 by Exodus »


 

Offline Quantumcat

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #1 on: 12/07/2004 08:27:47 »
I don't know if an artificial retina exists yet, and you wouldn't be able to replace your eyes with big cats' eyes because they would be rejected by the body.

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Offline neilep

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #2 on: 12/07/2004 19:06:46 »
Are you serious ?...cos you made me smile !!!..if you are serious then I apologise...but apart from attaching a couple of torches to your head I'm quite sure that there is no such surgical procedure for what you ask for.....espesh the transplanting with Big Cat eyes !!......but I would have thought OWL eyes would have been better.....come on you're having a laugh aren't you ?....but I suppose it's one of the procedures that may well be possible in the future....or mayby a drug that will enhance the capability of your own eyes.

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Offline chris

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #3 on: 13/07/2004 05:45:49 »
I thought Quantum was going to say "you couldn't replace your eyes with a big cat's eyes...because they wouldn't fit !"

But seriously, aside from the immune rejection point which has already been raised, there is a far more significant problem that you would need to overcome.

You'll note that no one has ever performed an eye transplant on a human. There are plenty of blind people with serious eye problems for whom an eye transplant would be curative. So why hasn't it been done ?

The reason is that the eye, and specifically the retina, is an extension of the central nervous system. Indeed the meninges, which enclose the brain and spinal cord, extend along the optic nerve and merge with the back of the eyeball.

As part of the central nervous system the retina suffers the same fate as any other part of the brain or spinal cord if you injure it, or operate on it - the nerve cells that connect the eyeball to the brain all die.

Therefore, if you did take the eye from an owl, or even an eye from a human donor, and implant it into a human face, the recipient would never see because the retinal ganglion cells, which make up the optic nerve, would all die.

But there are animals in which you can do this. Nobel prize winning neuroscientist Roger Sperry removed the eyes from frogs (and newts) and replaced them upside down. In these (simpler) animals the retina regenerates and the retinal ganglion cells grow back to restore the connections between the retina and the brain enabling the animals to see again.

The significance of putting the eyes back in upside down was that the cells reconnected with the brain as though the eye were still the right way up - so the frogs and newts were essentially transported into a "looking glass land" where, to them, everything appeared upside down and back to front. We know this because when they were offered food such as a fly dangling in front and above them they would jump back and take a bite out of the floor. As Roger Sperry remarked "the stupid frogs never learned".

It's really these observations from 40 years ago that fuel our intense search for the missing link to make injured brain and spinal nerves regrow in a human. We know that frogs, newts and goldfish can do it - so how do we make humans do it...?

We discussed these issues in a previous radio show with neurobiologist Dr. Adrian Pini :
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/html/shows/2002.05.05.htm#interview

This page put together in support of the interview with Adrian Pini also contains a wealth of links to sites about CNS nerve regeneration and CNS injury :
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/Guestfile/adrianpini.htm

Chris

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« Last Edit: 13/07/2004 05:46:42 by chris »
 

Offline Quantumcat

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #4 on: 14/07/2004 14:46:55 »
Oh ... that all reminds me of the biology lessons on the brain, nervous system and spinal cord, and the teacher's diagrams of which parts die when you cut different parts, so we could figure out where the cell bodies were and where the neurones and axones were.

If all the nervous parts die in the eye when you cut it off from the body, then it would only have neurones and not cell bodies in it, and can't you make artificial neurones? And there definitely exist robots and other electrical things (like furbies) that react to light, so why can't you make an artificial eye???

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Offline chris

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #5 on: 15/07/2004 06:23:20 »
The retina is a multilayer processor. The photoreceptors (which contain the light-sensitive retinal pigment rhodopsin) are are the top and are connected, via a system of secondary or interneurones, to the retinal ganglion cells (at the bottom) which give rise to the axons or nerve fibres in the optic nerve. The retinal ganglion cells have their cell bodies within the retina and hence if you cut the optic nerve you 'axotomise' the retinal ganglion cells and they did, but, bizarrely, not all at once.

Indeed, the time it takes a cell to die after its axon is cut seems to be proportional to how far away from the cell body the cut is made. So cutting the axon close to the cell body leads to rapid cell death, whilst cutting closer to the axon terminus leads to a more delayed death. No one quite knows why.

Chris

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Offline qazibasit

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #6 on: 18/07/2004 12:10:44 »
well you are new than i can expect you such a question but dear it is not at all possible.
 

Offline Ultima

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #7 on: 21/07/2004 21:36:12 »
I beg to differ, :D

http://www.bostonretinalimplant.org/
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/1883889.stm

With the current level of prosthetics being developed at the moment it is not fantastical to say that, in the future we will have the ability to enhance the human eye to the point that we can see an extended spectrum to maybe include radio or terahertz waves (so you can see through walls and clothing)... to have super long vision like birds of prey or to SEE IN THE DARK, or even correction for seeing underwater etc... Once the hardware is good enough to give an image at near to the native resolution of the eye, it’s just a matter of software to filter out that image to do whatever. Obviously there has to be a need for this technology to be developed, but I imagine the US military is probably interested in bionics. In fact you could even use an implant like the one described as a head up display for a computer… Imagine a film played back onto the whole of you retina :D no more black bars at the sides of the picture.


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Offline Predator_X

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #8 on: 11/01/2005 13:45:49 »
Dont get a dog eye or u might be seeing ghost everywhere. People say that dogs can see ghost right????
 

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Re: Getting surgery to help your eyes see in the dark?
« Reply #8 on: 11/01/2005 13:45:49 »

 

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