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Author Topic: What animals do not see in color?  (Read 3207 times)

Offline Karen W.

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What animals do not see in color?
« on: 22/11/2007 22:05:00 »
I have heard that some animals do not see in color. Is this true and which animals as I have no idea?


 

another_someone

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What animals do not see in color?
« Reply #1 on: 23/11/2007 02:59:19 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monochromat
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It used to be confidently claimed that most mammals other than humans and our fellow primates were monochromats. In the last half-century, however, evidence of at least dichromatic color vision in a number of mammalian orders has accumulated. Two of the orders of sea mammals, the pinnipeds (which includes the seal, sea lion, and walrus) and cetaceans (which includes dolphins and whales) clearly are cone monochromats, since the short-wavelength sensitive cone system is genetically disabled in these animals. The same is true of the owl monkeys, genus Aotus.

It is also commonly held that bulls (I assume all bovines) are monochromats, but I have not yet found a definitive site to support this (although none that contradict it either).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_vision
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Other animals may have more complex color vision systems than humans (for review see Kelber et al. 2003). These are many tropical fish and birds. In the latter case tetrachromacy is achieved through up to four cone types, depending on species. Brightly colored oil droplets inside the cones shift or narrow the spectral sensitivity of the cell. Mammals other than primates generally have less effective two-receptor color perception systems, allowing only dichromatic color vision; marine mammals have only a single cone type and are thus monochromats. Many invertebrates see colors. Honey- and bumblebees have trichromatic color vision. Papilio butterflies apparently have tetrachromatic color vision despite of possessing six photoreceptor types (Arikawa 2003). The most complex color vision system in animal kingdom has been found in stomatopods with up to 12 different spectral receptor types (Cronin & Marshall 1989) which are thought to work as multiple dichromatic units.

HDTV just wont cut it for stomatopods.

http://www.blueboard.com/mantis/intro/what.htm
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The mantis shrimps are also world-renowned as having the world's most sophisticated vision. According to Dr Justin Marshall, the stomatopod eye "contains 16 different types of photoreceptors (12 for colour analysis, compared to our 3 cones), colour filters and many polarisation receptors, making it by far the world's most complex retina." Mantis shrimps can thus see polarized light and 4 colors of UV (ultraviolet) light, and they may also be able to distinguish up to 100,000 colors (compared to the 10,000 seen by human beings).
« Last Edit: 23/11/2007 03:06:18 by another_someone »
 

Offline Karen W.

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What animals do not see in color?
« Reply #2 on: 23/11/2007 05:02:03 »
That is very interesting.. especially on these tiny sea creatures etc. The intricate display of colors they see must be incredible! Thanks George!
 

Offline davlin47

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What animals do not see in color?
« Reply #3 on: 27/10/2009 08:45:56 »
Hello to all

When considering whether animals see in color, one approach is to look to the structure of the eyes to see if cones are present. Many nocturnal animals that scientists have studied lack cones, relying instead on greater numbers of rods for extended night vision and keener detection of movement. As an exception to the nocturnal rule, owls do have cones, leading scientists to believe these animals see in color. Most species of primates, birds, cats and dogs also see in color to some degree.

Humans have three sets of cones for detecting color in different wavelengths: cones that detect red wavelengths, cones that detect blue, and cones that detect green, though each cone detects a wide spectrum that overlaps to create other hues. Animals like cats and dogs have two sets of cones, making them color-blind to specific colors. They do, however, have many more rods than humans, giving them greater night vision and a keener ability to detect motion


Thanks for sharing
« Last Edit: 28/10/2009 17:03:24 by BenV »
 

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What animals do not see in color?
« Reply #3 on: 27/10/2009 08:45:56 »

 

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