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Author Topic: What are Blood Groups?  (Read 4000 times)

Offline pirunner

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What are Blood Groups?
« on: 08/12/2007 03:59:00 »
What does your blood type (blood group) do or deal with in the body?
« Last Edit: 08/12/2007 12:54:47 by chris »


 

Offline stana

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Re: What are Blood Groups?
« Reply #1 on: 08/12/2007 10:39:37 »
This is about human blood types, I am not sure about animal blood types

A blood type (also called a blood group) is a classification of blood based on the presence or absence of inherited antigenic substances on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs). These antigens may be proteins, carbohydrates, glycoproteins or glycolipids, depending on the blood group system, and some of these antigens are also present on the surface of other types of cells of various tissues. Several of these red blood cell surface antigens, that stem from one allele (or very closely linked genes), collectively form a blood group system.
 

Offline Alandriel

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Re: What are Blood Groups?
« Reply #2 on: 08/12/2007 12:35:28 »
Stana answered you on *what* it is. I’ll have a go on the *what does it do*

-   it identifies you more reliably than race, culture or geography
-   it is (part of) a genetic blueprint for who you are and some experts( Dr. James D’Adomo, Dr. Peter J.D’Adomo) have postulated that it can be used as a guide to more healthy eating and living



But allow me first a bit of history (excerpts from book published by the above author, ‘Eat right for your type’)



The story of humankind is the story of survival. More specifically, it’s the story of where humans lived and what they could eat. It is about food, finding food and moving to find food. We don’t know for certain when human evolution began. Neanderthals, the first humanoids we can recognize may have developed 500’000 years ago, or even earlier. We do know that human prehistory began in Africa, where we evolved from human-like creatures. Early life was short, nasty and brutish.
Neanderthals probably ate a rather crude diet of wild plants, grubs and scavenged leftovers. They were more often prey than predator, especially when it came to infections and parasitic afflictions. (Many of the parasites, worms and infectious micro-organisms found in Africa do not stimulate the immune system to produce a specific antibody to them.)
As the human race moved around and was forced to adapt its diet to changing conditions, the new diet provoked adaptations in the digestive tract and the immune system necessary for it to first survive and later thrive in each new habitat. These changes are reflected in the development of blood types which appear to have arrived at critical junctures of human development:

1.   The ascent of humans to the top of the food chain: evolution of Type 0 to its fullest expression
2.   The change from hunter-gatherer to a more domesticated agrarian lifestyle: appearance of type A
3.   The merging and migration of the races from Africa to Europe, Asia and the Americas: development of Type B
4.   The modern intermingling of disparate groups: the arrival of Type AB




O = Old

The oldest and most basic blood type, the survivor at the top of the food chain with a strong an ornery immune system willing to and capable of destroying anyone, friend or foe.

The appearance of our Cro-Magnon ancestors around 40’000BC propelled the human species to the top of the food chain. Skilful and formidable hunters they had little to fear from any of their animal rivals. With no natural predators other than themselves the population exploded. Protein (meat) was their fuel and it was at this point that the digestive attributes of Blood Type 0 reached its fullest expression.




A = Agrarian

The first immigrants, forced by necessity of migration to adapt a more agrarian diet and lifestyle – a more cooperative personality (more tolerant immune system) to get along in crowded conditions

Type A blood initially appeared somewhere in Asia or the Middle East between 25’000 and 15’000BC ion response to new environmental conditions. It emerged at the peak of the Neolithic Period which followed the Old Stone Age of the Cro-Magnon hunters. Agriculture and animal domestication were the hallmarks of its culture. Able to forgo their hand-to-mouth existence, able to sustain themselves for the first time, people established stable communities and permanent living structures. This radically different lifestyle, a major change in diet, resulted in an entirely new mutation in the digestive tract and the immune systems. A mutation that allowed them to better tolerate and absorb cultivated grains and other agricultural products as well as produce immune responses to the myriad of infections provoked by an increased populace, changed environmental conditions and major dietary changes.




B = Balance

The assimilator, adapting to new climates and the mingling of populations, representing nature’s quest for a more balanced force between tensions of the mind and the demands of the immune system.

Type B developed sometime between 10’000 – 15’000BC in the area of the Himalayan highlands (now part of Pakistan and India). Pushed from the hot, lush savannahs of Africa to the cold, unyielding highlands of the Himalayas, blood type B may have initially mutated in response to dramatic climatic changes. It first appeared in India or the Ural region of Asia among a mix of Caucasian and Mongolian tribes. This new blood type was soon characteristic of the great tribes of steppe dwellers who by this time dominated the Eurasian plains. The Mongolians spread northwards pursuing a culture dependent upon herding and domesticating animals, as their diet of meat and cultured dairy products reflected.
Two distinct type B sprang up as the pastoral nomads pushed into Asia: an agrarian, comparatively sedentary group in the south and east; a nomadic, war-like society conquering the north and west. The nomads penetrated far into Eastern Europe and the gene for Type B is still in strong evidence among many of the east European populations. In the meantime an entire agriculturally based culture had spread throughout China and south East Asia. The schism between the warlike tribes of the north and the peaceful farmers to the south was deep, and its remnants exist to this day in Southern Asian cuisine which uses little if any dairy foods.
Of all the ABO types, type B shows the most clearly defined geographic distribution. Stretching as a great belt across the Eurasian plains and down to the Indian subcontinent, Type B is found in increased numbers from Japan, Mongolia, China and India up to the Ural Mountains. From there, westward, the percentages fall until a low is reached at the western tip of Europe.




AB = modern

The delicate offspring of a rare merger between the tolerant type A and the formerly barbaric but more balanced type B.
Type AB blood is rare. Emerging from the intermingling of Type A Caucasians with Type B Mongolians it is found in less than 5% of the population an it is the newest of the blood types. Because type ABs inherit the tolerance of both Type A and Type B, their immune systems have an enhanced ability to manufacture more specific antibodies to microbial infections. This unique quality of possessing neither anti-A nor anti-B antibodies minimized their chances of being prone to allergies and other autoimmune diseases e.g. arthritis, imflammation etc. There is however a greater predisposition to certain cancers because type AB responds to anything A-like or B-like as ‘self’ so it manufactures no opposing antibodies.


There is of course a lot more to it all than just that and the author goes on to outline how blood type affects body chemistry and how this can be utilized to gain an insight into suitable diet and excercise for the different blood types.
I can only highly recommended anyone interested to read: Eat right for your type by Dr. Peter J.D’Adamo
 

Offline iko

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What are Blood Groups?
« Reply #3 on: 08/12/2007 14:07:21 »
Hi friends,

I just found that "blood groups" search gives
seven previous topics in this forum!  [8D]


...then type "blood groups"
« Last Edit: 08/12/2007 14:09:10 by iko »
 

Offline pirunner

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What are Blood Groups?
« Reply #4 on: 08/12/2007 17:10:28 »
I can only highly recommended anyone interested to read: Eat right for your type by Dr. Peter J.D’Adamo

Alandriel, do you have any personal experience with this diet?
 

Offline Alandriel

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What are Blood Groups?
« Reply #5 on: 08/12/2007 17:18:12 »
Yes Pirunner, I actually do. I myself have followed it (not quite to the T  ;) but still, with major changes especially with  respect to eating meat - I'm type A which translated to pretty much no red meat of any kind) and know of quite a number of other people who have done too ~ with excellent results.
But make up your own mind. Read the book and others on a similar topic.
 

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What are Blood Groups?
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