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Author Topic: Is there inertia in space?  (Read 9198 times)

Offline blurred88

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Is there inertia in space?
« on: 12/12/2007 04:49:43 »
Hi, my name is Fairul, I'm doing research for secondary level education. I'm sorry to say that I do not have a strong science background. Could somebody help me explain something, Is there Inertia in space? And if possible, if u have a reference to the information/explanation, I'd appreciate it very much! Thank you.


 

another_someone

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #1 on: 12/12/2007 08:38:15 »
Inertia is something that exists everywhere, and is no different in space than it is on earth - the context makes no difference, it is a primary attribute of all matter wherever it is.  More correctly, inertia will be known as momentum, since that is the physical quantity that scientists will be working with.
 

Offline daveshorts

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #2 on: 12/12/2007 10:05:12 »
I answered something similar on this week's show:

http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/questions/question/1815/
 

Offline blurred88

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #3 on: 12/12/2007 10:41:47 »
Thanks for the explanations guys/gals. I appreciate the link as well and will look it up in a bit.
 

Offline turnipsock

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #4 on: 12/12/2007 13:02:49 »
How do you weigh things in space?
 

another_someone

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lyner

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #6 on: 12/12/2007 20:49:13 »
This is a hobbyhorse of mine but the term 'inertia' is not really defined. The nearest thing to it that I can think of is Mass, rather than Momentum.  This makes it a risky word to use, at all.
Science tries to avoid more than one word for one concept and certainly tries to avoid more than one meaning for one word. Let's use the proper words when we want to be unambiguous.
 

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Is there inertia in space?
« Reply #6 on: 12/12/2007 20:49:13 »

 

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