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Author Topic: Antisocial hours and illness  (Read 2960 times)

Offline NakedScientist

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Antisocial hours and illness
« on: 18/04/2003 19:29:18 »
IMPACT OF ANTISOCIAL LIFESTYLE "HAS
BEEN NEGLECTED"

Evidence suggests that an antisocial lifestyle is linked to
illness, injury, and premature death, yet while links
between deprivation and health have been widely
studied, links between antisocial lifestyle and health have
been neglected, according to two experts in this week's
BMJ.

The impact of an antisocial lifestyle on health is
increasingly well understood, write Professors Jonathan
Shepherd and David Farrington. For example, early
contact with the police, truancy, school misconduct, and
divorce are significant predictors of premature death.

Studies have also found links between an antisocial
lifestyle and injury, especially injury sustained in assaults
at age 16-18 and on the roads or at work at age 27 to
32.

Family, school, and police interventions can reduce these
health risks, say the authors. For example, pre-school
education and management training for parents have
helped to reduce a range of antisocial behaviours
including offending and alcohol or other drug misuse.

Effective police interventions include patrols targeted at
known hotspots of violence and arrest of serious repeat
offenders, drunk drivers, and employed suspects of
domestic violence.

Nowhere are the impacts of antisocial lifestyle on health
more apparent than in prisons, add the authors. The
recent transfer of responsibility for prison health services
in England and Wales from the Home Office to the
Department of Health is logical, and a prompt both to
acknowledge relationships between crime, injury, and
illness and to develop integrated prevention and
treatment, they conclude.


(Editorial: The impact of antisocial lifestyle on health)
http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/326/7394/834


 

jolly

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Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #1 on: 25/02/2007 13:15:20 »
I agree, france has one of the highest life expetancy in europe and the lowest working hours in europe. Fits. spain has a simlier life style to france but longer working hours. I wonder who is the longer lived? As the spainish are very social maybe more so than the french! 
 

another_someone

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Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #2 on: 26/02/2007 08:18:24 »
Correlation is not cause.
 

Offline rosy

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Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #3 on: 26/02/2007 19:01:53 »
Interesting that this post is titled "antisocial hours and illness", and seems instead to be about "antisocial behaviour and illness"... possible the title might be adjusted? I was expecting to find a thread about the effect of shift work on lifespan.

On the actual topic under discussion, is this a joke?
Quote
Studies have also found links between an antisocial
lifestyle and injury, especially injury sustained in assaults
at age 16-18 and on the roads or at work at age 27 to
32.
So, people who have been indicated to be a bit disinclined to act responsibly (they've drawn the police's attention, probably some correlation there at least as a population) have been shown to have more injuries in assults (well, duh!), on the road (bad driving..) and at work (I imagine these people are less likely to have good qualifications and so less likely to have safe, desk-bound "white-collar" jobs.


 

Offline iko

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Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #4 on: 26/02/2007 21:11:29 »
Hi Rosy,

you are quite right, to me
all this sounds a bit obvious...

Monsieur De Lapalisse
 

another_someone

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Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #5 on: 26/02/2007 22:08:26 »
It is double edged.

It is reasonable that people who are 'anti-social' are less likely to take good care of themselves; but it might also be an element that those people who feel they are lacking the social and emotional support of society around them are more likely to behave anti-socially (and these people may also feel there is little point to looking after themselves because they don't see anybody else looking after them, and they don't think there is much hope for a future for them anyway).
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Antisocial hours and illness
« Reply #5 on: 26/02/2007 22:08:26 »

 

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