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Author Topic: over wintering flies  (Read 2947 times)

Offline ukmicky

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over wintering flies
« on: 19/12/2007 22:38:37 »
Where do common house flies go in the winter.

They don't crawl about in maggot form waiting for summer and Ive never seen a house fly hibernating like ladybirds so what happens to them.


 

Offline opus

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over wintering flies
« Reply #1 on: 19/12/2007 23:30:32 »
I think they overwinter as pupae, emerging in the spring/summer.
 

Offline Vcoolspice

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over wintering flies
« Reply #2 on: 04/02/2008 19:48:37 »
Each species has developed some way of dealing with the cold weather.

One insect follows the example of the migratory birds and heads south. The monarch butterfly's from east of the Rocky Mountains eventually find their way to central Mexico, where they overwinter in the mountain highlands near Mexico City. One or two areas are protected as monarch refuges. Monarchs from west of the Rockies travel to a spot near Santa Barbara, California. These are true migrating insects because the same individuals that go south for the winter come back the next year.

Some other insects, such as leafhoppers and milkweed bugs, strategy for dealing with winter is to head south as the winter cools. They reinvade the next year, but in this case, it's different individuals that return.

Most insects stay here year round. They employ a variety of tactics for survival. One is simply to move in with humans. Insects such as ladybird beetles (ladybugs), cluster flies, elm leaf beetles and boxelder bugs overwinter as adults in wall voids, attics and other out-of-the-way places in homes and other structures.

Before humans started building insect hotels, they probably found shelter in hollow logs and other natural cavities.

Many insects spend the winter in immature stages - as eggs (the bagworm is a good example), as larvae underground (cicadas and June beetles) or as pupae (the large silkworm moths such as the Cecropia).

Yellowjacket and paper wasp queens, some mosquitoes and the mourning cloak butterfly are other examples of local insects that overwinter as adults. Like the ladybird beetle, they seek out a protected spot and become dormant until warm weather activates them again.

 

Offline rosalind dna

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over wintering flies
« Reply #3 on: 04/02/2008 20:06:10 »
I have noticed that I have been getting a lot of ladybirds nesting in my
spare room's window frame. They appear everywhere and should be outdoors I think
but they just freeze if it's frosty outside as the window's frame is metallic
and painted too.
I don't know why.
 

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over wintering flies
« Reply #3 on: 04/02/2008 20:06:10 »

 

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