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Offline BoRiS32

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« on: 22/12/2007 05:26:23 »
Hi.

I have recently been experiencing deja vu-like feelings lately. For example, lets say... I'm on my computer listening to a song and reading an article, if I do the same thing in a week or so, ex: i'm listening to the same song... near the same time of day... while reading the same article, I begin to sense a feeling of deja vu that puts my mind in a state of fear, sometimes i also feel like I want to throw up. This lasts about 30 seconds usually. Lately, I have also been experiencing paranoia... like... somebody is talking, but I think that they are talking about me, and trying to plot something about me.

Am I going crazy or what ? has anybody else experienced this ?


 

Offline RD

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #1 on: 22/12/2008 18:52:29 »
Epileptic seizures can cause déja vu, nausea, fear and audible hallucinations ...


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Simple Partial Seizures

Doctors often divide simple partial seizures into categories depending on the type of symptoms the person experiences:

Motor seizures:
These cause a change in muscle activity. For example, a person may have abnormal movements such as jerking of a finger or stiffening of part of the body. These movements may spread, either staying on one side of the body (opposite the affected area of the brain) or extending to both sides. Other examples are weakness, which can even affect speech, and coordinated actions such as laughter or automatic hand movements. The person may or may not be aware of these movements.

Sensory seizures:
These cause changes in any one of the senses. People with sensory seizures may smell or taste things that aren't there; hear clicking, ringing, or a person's voice when there is no actual sound; or feel a sensation of "pins and needles" or numbness. Seizures may even be painful for some patients. They may feel as if they are floating or spinning in space. They may have visual hallucinations, seeing things that aren't there (a spot of light, a scene with people). They also may experience illusions—distortions of true sensations. For instance, they may believe that a parked car is moving farther away, or that a person's voice is muffled when it's actually clear.

Autonomic seizures:
These cause changes in the part of the nervous system that automatically controls bodily functions. These common seizures may include strange or unpleasant sensations in the stomach, chest, or head; changes in the heart rate or breathing; sweating; or goose bumps.

Psychic seizures:
These seizures change how people think, feel, or experience things. They may have problems with memory, garbled speech, an inability to find the right word, or trouble understanding spoken or written language. They may suddenly feel emotions like fear, depression, or happiness with no outside reason. Some may feel as though they are outside their body or may have feelings of déja vu ("I've been through this before") or jamais vu ("This is new to me"— even though the setting is really familiar).
http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/seizure_simplepartial
« Last Edit: 22/12/2008 18:57:08 by RD »
 

lyner

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #2 on: 22/12/2008 20:05:56 »
I had a phase of 'acute deja vu' when I was a lot younger.
A particular set of circumstances would get me into an almost dreamlike state in which everything that was said seemed to have a wierd predictability -almost as if I were reading the script of the conversation.

It seemed to relate to tiredness and stress and went away of its own accord. Haven't had a repeat for many years.  It wasn't that unpleasant, actually - just a bit debilitating at the time and a bit scary when I wasn't used to the events.
It left a similar feeling to what I can experience during 'repeated dreams', which I still get. (Unfortunately, they are not erotic but silly and confusing situations)
 

Offline RD

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #3 on: 22/12/2008 20:39:26 »
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Around a third of children with epilepsy will grow out of it when they reach adulthood.

Seizures often come without warning, although they may be triggered by a variety of events, including flashing lights, tiredness or stress.

In simple partial seizures the child doesn't lose consciousness. Symptoms can include twitching, numbness, dizziness, nausea, disturbances to hearing, vision, smell or taste, or a strong sense of déjà vu.
http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/childhood_seizures.html

 

Offline JnA

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #4 on: 22/12/2008 23:18:38 »
My partner gets dizzy and nauseous when he has a dejavu... so is he actually having a seizure?
 

Offline RD

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #5 on: 23/12/2008 01:30:50 »
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As people grow older, the frequency of déjà vu trails off dramatically. The average twentysomething experiences it about three times a year; middle-aged people rarely experience it more than once a decade.
http://discovermagazine.com/2005/sep/psychology-of-deja-vu

Someone with untreated epilepsy could experience déjà vu weekly.
 

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Déjà Vu - a mental disorder ?
« Reply #5 on: 23/12/2008 01:30:50 »

 

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