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Author Topic: What can i do with these chemicals?  (Read 8942 times)

Anastasia.fr.1

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« on: 23/12/2007 12:07:42 »
I have got these in my chemistry set, what experiments can i do with just these?


Ammonium Iron Sulphate
Aluminium Potassium Sulphate
Sodium Thiosulphate
Aluminium Chloride
Calcium hydroxide
Sodium Carbonate
Copper Sulphate
Sodium Hydrogen Sulphate
Calcium Carbonate
Iron Sulphate and
Zinc

Thank you.


 

Offline lightarrow

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #1 on: 23/12/2007 13:59:07 »
I have got these in my chemistry set, what experiments can i do with just these?

Ammonium Iron Sulphate
Aluminium Potassium Sulphate
Sodium Thiosulphate
Aluminium Chloride
Calcium hydroxide
Sodium Carbonate
Copper Sulphate
Sodium Hydrogen Sulphate
Calcium Carbonate
Iron Sulphate and
Zinc

Thank you.

Many, it's not possible to write all of them. Consider however that:

1. You can use a water solution of your Sodium Hydrogen Sulphate = NaHSO4, or of Aluminium Chloride = AlCl3 or Aluminium Potassium Sulphate = AlK(SO4)2 as your acids.

2. A water solution of Sodium Carbonate = Na2CO3 or of Calcium hydroxide = Ca(OH)2 (much less soluble than the previous, however), as your bases.

3. A water solution of Sodium Thiosulphate = Na2S2O3 or Zinc = Zn (not water soluble but it doesn't matter) as your reducing compounds; also  Ammonium Iron Sulphate and Iron Sulphate, if Iron (= Fe), is Fe(II) in those compounds (it's not specified in that list, even if usually is Fe(II)).

4. You can use a water solution of Copper Sulphate = CuSO4 as your oxidant compound. You can also use an acid as oxidant if you use a metal (Zn) as reducing.

5. Mixing an acid with a base you (usually) have an acid-base reaction.

6. Mixing an oxidant with a reducing you (can) have an oxide-reducing reaction.

7. If you mix water solutions of 2 different soluble salts you can get an unsoluble salt and so a precipitation reaction.
« Last Edit: 23/12/2007 14:32:08 by lightarrow »
 

Offline lightarrow

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #2 on: 23/12/2007 14:31:07 »
At this point I write you only *some* reactions; consider all the compounds dissolved in water, excepting Zn and CaCO3, in the following reactions:

1. You need a clean water solution of Ca(OH)2; for this you have to filtrate the mix of (little amount) Ca(OH)2 and water.

Na2CO3 + Ca(OH)2 --> CaCO3 + 2NaOH

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

2. 2NaHSO4 + Zn --> ZnSO4 + Na2SO4 + H2

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

3. CuSO4 + Zn --> Cu + ZnSO4

What happens?......

4. 2AlK(SO4)2 + 3Na2CO3 + 3H2O --> 2Al(OH)3 + 3Na2SO4 + K2SO4 + 3CO2.

5. NaHSO4 + CaCO3 --> CaSO4 + NaHCO3

Here is there difference if you use a little or a great amount of NaHSO4?

If you are interested I can write you some others reactions; maybe also involving Iron, if you can confirm it's Fe(II) in those compounds.
« Last Edit: 23/12/2007 14:41:55 by lightarrow »
 

Anastasia.fr.1

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #3 on: 23/12/2007 14:59:19 »
Thank you, i will try them.
 

Anastasia.fr.1

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #4 on: 23/12/2007 17:24:37 »
5. Mixing an acid with a base you (usually) have an acid-base reaction.

6. Mixing an oxidant with a reducing you (can) have an oxide-reducing reaction.

7. If you mix water solutions of 2 different soluble salts you can get an unsoluble salt and so a precipitation reaction.


5. when i did that i got a fizzy reaction.

6. when i did that it started off dark blue then it got lighter as i put the reducer in.

7. this did work.
                 thank you very much  ;D
 

Anastasia.fr.1

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #5 on: 23/12/2007 17:30:26 »
At this point I write you only *some* reactions; consider all the compounds dissolved in water, excepting Zn and CaCO3, in the following reactions:

1. You need a clean water solution of Ca(OH)2; for this you have to filtrate the mix of (little amount) Ca(OH)2 and water.

Na2CO3 + Ca(OH)2 --> CaCO3 + 2NaOH

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

2. 2NaHSO4 + Zn --> ZnSO4 + Na2SO4 + H2

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

3. CuSO4 + Zn --> Cu + ZnSO4

What happens?......

4. 2AlK(SO4)2 + 3Na2CO3 + 3H2O --> 2Al(OH)3 + 3Na2SO4 + K2SO4 + 3CO2.

5. NaHSO4 + CaCO3 --> CaSO4 + NaHCO3

Here is there difference if you use a little or a great amount of NaHSO4?

If you are interested I can write you some others reactions; maybe also involving Iron, if you can confirm it's Fe(II) in those compounds.

thank you for the experment but could you explan it a bit more beause im only 9 and my dads rubish !
 

Offline lightarrow

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #6 on: 23/12/2007 19:45:07 »
At this point I write you only *some* reactions; consider all the compounds dissolved in water, excepting Zn and CaCO3, in the following reactions:

1. You need a clean water solution of Ca(OH)2; for this you have to filtrate the mix of (little amount) Ca(OH)2 and water.

Na2CO3 + Ca(OH)2 --> CaCO3 + 2NaOH

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

2. 2NaHSO4 + Zn --> ZnSO4 + Na2SO4 + H2

What happens? What kind of reaction is among those I wrote you?

3. CuSO4 + Zn --> Cu + ZnSO4

What happens?......

4. 2AlK(SO4)2 + 3Na2CO3 + 3H2O --> 2Al(OH)3 + 3Na2SO4 + K2SO4 + 3CO2.

5. NaHSO4 + CaCO3 --> CaSO4 + NaHCO3

Here is there difference if you use a little or a great amount of NaHSO4?

If you are interested I can write you some others reactions; maybe also involving Iron, if you can confirm it's Fe(II) in those compounds.

thank you for the experment but could you explan it a bit more beause im only 9 and my dads rubish !
I would like to have a 9 y.o. daughter as interested in chemistry as you are!

1. In this reaction both Na2CO3 and Ca(OH)2 water solutions are clean and colourless; when you mix them, immediately an opaque milky-white compound forms: it's the insoluble CaCO3.
Explanation:
When Na2CO3 is dissolved in water, it dissociates in ions Na+ and CO3--, while Ca(OH)2 dissociates in ions Ca++ and OH-:

Na2CO3 + water --> 2Na+ + CO3--
Ca(OH)2 + water --> Ca++ + 2OH-

All these ions are mixed when you mix the 2 solutions; then ions Ca++ and CO3-- immediately attract each other forming a strong bond and so CaCO3, not soluble anylonger, appears as milky-white. If then you wait some minutes, this white compound slowly goes down and you can see it all at the bottom.

So this is a reaction of the kind 7 in my list.

By the way: CaCO3 is the chemical of which marble is made of, so with this reaction you have created...pure marble powder!

2. 2NaHSO4 + Zn --> ZnSO4 + Na2SO4 + H2.

This is an oxide-reduction reaction, so of the kind 6. Here Zn is the reducing and hydrogen (coming from NaHSO4) the oxidant. The reaction fizzes because bubbles of gaseous hydrogen H2 forms.

3. CuSO4 + Zn --> Cu + ZnSO4

Another oxide-reduction. CuSO4 dissolves in water dissociating in ions Cu++ and SO4--. Cu++ is the oxidant, metallic Zn the reducing.

Anastasia, try to put a piece of clean iron (not inox steel) inside the solution of CuSO4, let it stay many minutes or an hour (it depends on concentration and on the iron) and then take away the iron and observe its colour. What happened?


4. 2AlK(SO4)2 + 3Na2CO3 + 3H2O --> 2Al(OH)3 + 3Na2SO4 + K2SO4 + 3CO2

This, as well as reaction 5., is more complicated; here 2 kinds of reactions happens: an acid-base reaction and a precipitation. The result is the formation of gaseous CO2 as in reaction 5 and the formation of an insoluble compound, that is, Al(OH)3.

5. NaHSO4 + CaCO3 --> CaSO4 + NaHCO3

the ions HSO4-, coming from NaHSO4, are acidic and reacts with the base CaCO3 dissolving it and forming ions SO4--, Ca++ and HCO3-; then the ions Ca++ combine with ions SO4-- forming insoluble CaSO4 (it is gypsum!); you can also have the precipitation of NaHCO3 if the concentration is high enough. You should also see some bubbles of CO2.
If the amount of NaHSO4 was quite greater than the amount of CaCO3, then CO2 is produced in high amount and the reaction is very fizzy:

HSO4- + HCO3- --> SO4-- + H2O + CO2
 

Anastasia.fr.1

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #7 on: 23/12/2007 19:58:16 »
Thank you Lightarrow i will try them when i'v done all my other chrismas scince things,and have a good christmas.
 

Offline lightarrow

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #8 on: 24/12/2007 02:32:16 »
Thank you Lightarrow i will try them when i'v done all my other chrismas scince things,and have a good christmas.
Have a good Christmas Anastasia!
Bye!
 

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What can i do with these chemicals?
« Reply #8 on: 24/12/2007 02:32:16 »

 

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