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Author Topic: Is radiation poisining hereditary?  (Read 3284 times)

Offline stana

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« on: 31/12/2007 16:42:29 »
Hey guys. I was watching a movie the other night. And i wondered:

If i come into contact with penetrating radiation. And it deforms me in some way. Before i die, will i be able to have children? If i am able to, would my children be radioactive and deformed like me also?

Thanks


 

Offline stana

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #1 on: 31/12/2007 16:43:19 »
My bad on the spelling

Radiaton poisoning

Knew i could spell it.
 

another_someone

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #2 on: 31/12/2007 18:47:58 »
Firstly, it is very unlikely that radiation poisoning would leave you radioactive (if you were that badly effected, then you would be dead too quickly, and not have the energy to do much before death, so you are very unlikely to get a girl pregnant).

Nor will radiation be likely to 'deform' you - it will burn you, and cause cancers, but deformation would be something that will happen to embryos not to grown (or even almost completely grown) men.

Since sperm is something that is continually being produced, after a period of 3 months, it is unlikely that you will have any damaged sperm left (you may not have any sperm at all, but if you have any, it will probably be healthy).  The situation is slightly different for women, since they have their full compliment of eggs when they are born, so if they are damaged by radiation, they could not be replaced by new healthy eggs.

The likelihood is that if either the egg or the sperm is significantly damaged, then the ensuing embryo will never be viable (i.e. the woman's body will reject the fertilised egg as non-functional, and she will miscarry before she even knows she is pregnant).
 

Offline stana

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #3 on: 31/12/2007 18:58:01 »
Thanks

So, if a woman was pregnant, and she was infected with radiation, and the radiation penetrated to the embryo. Theoretically, the baby could be deformed?

thanks..again
 

another_someone

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #4 on: 01/01/2008 00:20:13 »
Thanks

So, if a woman was pregnant, and she was infected with radiation, and the radiation penetrated to the embryo. Theoretically, the baby could be deformed?

thanks..again

If the embryo was already established, then there is still a significant likelihood the embryo would either be killed or rejected, and so the woman would miscarry; but there remains a significant possibility that if the damage was not as severe as that, it could cause a deformed baby to be born without actually killing the embryo.
 

Offline _Stefan_

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #5 on: 01/01/2008 01:00:05 »
If the radiation causes mutations in the DNA of the sperm precursor cells or in the present sperm and egg cells themselves, is it not likely that if the cells remain viable, offspring conceived with the mutated gametes develop deformities in this way?
 

another_someone

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #6 on: 01/01/2008 08:12:24 »
If the radiation causes mutations in the DNA of the sperm precursor cells or in the present sperm and egg cells themselves, is it not likely that if the cells remain viable, offspring conceived with the mutated gametes develop deformities in this way?

For the egg, it is a slightly greater possibility.

The trouble is that 99.99% (not an accurate figure - so please don't tell me you have stats that show it is 99.97%) of damage to the cell will cause such major damage that the cell will simply not function.

Even if the cell functions, if one is talking about sperm cells, it will be competing against millions of healthy sperm to try and reach a fertilise the egg - that is tough competition to match for a weakened sperm to compete against.
 

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Is radiation poisining hereditary?
« Reply #6 on: 01/01/2008 08:12:24 »

 

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