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16/04/2014 04:16:25

Author Topic: What is Brown's gas (oxyhydrogen)?  (Read 13648 times)

lyner

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  • on: 03/01/2008 22:54:20
do a search on Google and then tell me it's anything other than a spoof.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2008 08:04:32 by chris »

Karen W.

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  • Reply #1 on: 03/01/2008 23:33:55
This is what wiki says:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown's_gas#Brown.27s_gas

Brown's gas

Some water torch models mix the two gases immediately after production (instead of at the torch tip) making the gas mixture more accurate; this electrolyzer design is called common ducting. Common ducted electrolyzers are typically series cell parallel plate design, but can also be built using cylindrical cells. The main criteria for common ducting is a single gas output hose. Oxyhydrogen gas produced this way is sometimes called Brown's gas (see below). Oxyhydrogen gas produced in an independently ducted electrolyzer is not considered Brown's Gas. Independently ducted electrolyzers have substantially separated anodes and cathodes, are typically rod type design, and have separate hydrogen and oxygen gas output hoses.

Brown's gas, as presented by Yull Brown and subsequent investigators is a mixture of science and pseudoscience. Hoaxes are also claimed to be associated with Brown's gas due to a sourceless distinction from the water fuel cell; although, the lack of a defined relationship establishes a reasonable distinction in itself. Overall, considering the original claims of Yull Brown and those of subsequent investigators, Brown's gas is a sometimes overly hyped technology conforming with standard electrolysis parameters. Many of the claims about the gas[3] are well-understood properties of oxyhydrogen, including Atomic welding: "An electric arc is passed through the mixture of gas before burning, so that the gas molecules break into atomic oxygen and hydrogen, using the electrical energy to produce a hotter flame when the atoms recombine".

[edit] Applications

    * Torch use

    * Fuel enhancement (See also: Water Injection)

[edit] Foundational Information

    * Efficiency of electrolysis

    * Hydrogen welding

    * Air fuel ratio

    * Ignition timing

    * Octane rating

[edit] Substantive claims

    * Brown's gas is produced according to the 1st and 2nd laws of electrolysis.

    * Brown's gas is oxyhydrogen produced in a common ducted electrolyzer.

    * Brown's gas has a different flame temperature than oxyhydrogen not produced in a common ducted electrolyzer. This is not to be confused with the controversial claim below.

[edit] Controversial claims

    * Varying flame temperature; but this apparent effect can be explained due to inaccurate infrared thermometry,[4] and measurement of the target material rather than the flame itself.
    * An implosion (rather than explosion) effect; but this could be due to the resulting steam quickly condensing on the sides of the reaction chamber in the experiment.[5]

[edit] HHO
A mass spectrometry scan of HHO gas created with a PerkinElmer GC-MS Clarus 500, by SunLabs at the University of Tampa, Florida, showing a peak at 5 m/z. Ruggero Santilli claims that this peak can only be explained by his "magnecule" theory.
A mass spectrometry scan of HHO gas created with a PerkinElmer GC-MS Clarus 500, by SunLabs at the University of Tampa, Florida, showing a peak at 5 m/z. Ruggero Santilli claims that this peak can only be explained by his "magnecule" theory.

HHO gas or Klein gas is an oxyhydrogen mixture made by water electrolysis and has been trademarked Aquygen by the firm Hydrogen Technology Applications.

[edit] Controversial claims

    * Unverified claims [1] have been made about the properties of "HHO gas", claiming as basis an unproven new state of matter called magnegases[6] and an unproven theory about magnecules.

    * The claimed difference between HHO and Brown's gas is unverified, untested, and generally unsubstantiated.

Bored chemist

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  • Reply #2 on: 04/01/2008 01:03:04
Well done for spotting that, since it looks "too good to be true" it probably is.


The story of Brown's gas is a mixture of perfectly sound 19th century technology (the fact that white hot carbon reacts with steam to make hydrogen and carbon monoxide and the fact that elctrolysis of water gives hydrogen and oxygen) with 20th century ballderdash.

Sure, you can make the gases, but that's not magic. Sure the gases burn but that's also not magic. The best you can hope to do is recover the electrical energy you put in added to the energy you could have got by simply burning the carbon used to make the electrodes.
Big fat hairy deal.

Karen W.

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  • Reply #3 on: 04/01/2008 01:40:37
LOL LOL!

lyner

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  • Reply #4 on: 06/01/2008 16:39:39
I guess it's a handy way of producing a very hot flame if you don't want to obtain and store bottles of gas.
It's certainly not something for nothing.
I'm amazed at their fantastic range of generating equipment. I wonder if all the models are actually available - or do they make them and paint the outsides to order~?

 

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