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Author Topic: Canine Scabies and Humans  (Read 5260 times)

Offline elegantlywasted

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« on: 09/01/2008 23:27:11 »
Ok, so I get home from class today and find out that my roommate's parents home is not infested with bed bugs! *yay!* However, it turns out her dog has scabies. My roommate and her entire family have red, itchy bumps all over them. They currently have been using prescrition scabies and hydrocortisone creams.

My Question is: Is it possible for her infection to travel to me? Or are her bites just a side effect of being near the dog (the mites are only tasting, not living in her skin)? It has been driving me nuts because psychosomatically (I hope!) I'm very itchy.

 


 

Offline iko

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« Reply #1 on: 11/01/2008 12:17:11 »
Hi elegantlybitten!

...your worry could be justified: not just a mite test bite.

Pet-related infections.


Rabinowitz PM, Gordon Z, Odofin L.Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA. Peter.Rabinowitz@yale.edu

Human contact with cats, dogs, and other pets results in several million infections each year in the United States, ranging from self-limited skin conditions to life-threatening systemic illnesses. Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common pet-related parasitic infections. Although toxoplasmosis is usually asymptomatic or mild, it may cause serious congenital infection if a woman is exposed during pregnancy, particularly in the first trimester. Common pet-borne fungal infections include tinea corporis/capitis (ringworm); campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis are among the most common bacterial infections associated with pet ownership. Less commonly, pets can transmit arthropod-borne and viral illnesses (e.g., scabies, rabies). Infection in a pet can provide sentinel warning of local vectors and endemic conditions, such as Lyme disease risk. Treatment is infection-specific, although many infections are self-limited. Prevention involves common sense measures such as adequate hand washing, proper disposal of animal waste, and ensuring that infected animals are diagnosed and treated. Special precautions are indicated for immunocompromised persons. Increased communication between primary care physicians and veterinarians could improve treatment and prevention of these conditions.

Am Fam Physician. 2007 Nov 1;76(9):1314-22.



...but they will go away, in the end!

Quote
...
Human scabies is caused by the S scabiei mite, var hominis, an obligate human parasite (see Media File 1). Animal scabies mites may result in transient symptoms in humans, but they are not a cause of persistent infestations. The most efficient means of transmission is via direct and prolonged contact with an infected individual. Mites can survive up to 3 days away from human skin, so fomites such as infested bedding or clothing are an alternate but infrequent source of transmission.
...
more from: http://www.emedicine.com/DERM/topic382.htm   
« Last Edit: 11/01/2008 12:26:03 by iko »
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« Reply #2 on: 11/01/2008 17:21:51 »
Thank you so much iko, super informative and reassuring!
 

Offline elegantlywasted

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« Reply #3 on: 11/01/2008 17:22:03 »
and I'm not itchy anymore!!!
 

Offline iko

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« Reply #4 on: 11/01/2008 17:30:45 »
Thank you so much iko, super informative and reassuring!

You are welcome.
Have a wonderful 2008!

ikod

 

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Canine Scabies and Humans
« Reply #4 on: 11/01/2008 17:30:45 »

 

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