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Author Topic: Dissolution of Metallic Silver into Silver ions in aqueous media  (Read 6393 times)

Offline vickysuryaputra

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 :-\
I am a practicing dentist, and I have a patented invention in dentistry which uses silver for disinfection. The instrument made of silver when kept in the root canal in presence of biocompatible calcium hydroxide solution, releases silver ions which sterilizes the root canal. The instrument has grooves running along it so as to increase its effective surface area. At present i am planning to do further studies on this instrument using PCR and AAS.

I wud like to know which aqueous solution leads to maximum production of silver ions from silver metal. I am looking for a biocompatible solution in which i can place the metallic silver instrument, leading to the production of silver ions and thus sterilizing the area around the instrument. I am interested in solutions like Calcium hydroxide, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Sodium chloride an d any such biocompatible solutions.


 

Offline lightarrow

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:-\
I am a practicing dentist, and I have a patented invention in dentistry which uses silver for disinfection. The instrument made of silver when kept in the root canal in presence of biocompatible calcium hydroxide solution, releases silver ions which sterilizes the root canal. The instrument has grooves running along it so as to increase its effective surface area. At present i am planning to do further studies on this instrument using PCR and AAS.

I wud like to know which aqueous solution leads to maximum production of silver ions from silver metal. I am looking for a biocompatible solution in which i can place the metallic silver instrument, leading to the production of silver ions and thus sterilizing the area around the instrument. I am interested in solutions like Calcium hydroxide, Chlorhexidine gluconate, Sodium chloride an d any such biocompatible solutions.

If your instrument produces Ag+ ions, then a water solution containing chlorides is not appropriate because makes it precipitate: Ag+ + Cl- --> AgCl. The same with Br- and I-. Ag+ also precipitates with hydroxide forming AgO. I don't know what happens with gluconate.
Ag+ don't precipitates in presence of NO3- or of F-.
Also remembere that the solution should avoid light, or Ag+ is reduced to metallic Ag (as in the photographic film processes).
« Last Edit: 10/01/2008 08:33:33 by lightarrow »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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I think that, at the concentrations of silver needed to kill bugs, silver chloride might be soluble enough.
 

Offline vickysuryaputra

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Tks a lot lightarrow and Bored Chemist.

I am planning to do a study using Polymerase Chain Reaction for quantifying the antibacterial effect of the instrument. Also I am planning to use Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for quantifying the Silver ion release from the instrument with various root canal medicament's. I am particularly interested in Silver ion release when aq. Calcium hydroxide is used as the medicament. Calcium hydroxide due to its high pH is also microbicidal and hence we get a double effect when the silver instrument is used.

I am looking for a biocompatible aq. solution which promotes release of Ag+ ions. The instrument is placed in the root canal and sealed, hence it is light impervious. Your valuable inputs are welcome.
 

Offline vickysuryaputra

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Minimum inhibitory concentration, 0.1 g/mL Ag
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Are you sure about "0.1 g/mL Ag" it seems very high to me.
 

Offline vickysuryaputra

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For instance, results from the two studies that explored MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus (around 100 strains) range from 8 to 80 mg/L. Similarly, the two largest studies examining silver ion MIC values for approximately 100 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced a range from 8 to 70 mg/L.

This is from a review found in

newbielink:http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/59/4/587 [nonactive]

 

Offline vickysuryaputra

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I am also posting the diagram of the proposed mechanism of action of the invention and pics of the invention.


« Last Edit: 14/01/2008 05:40:00 by vickysuryaputra »
 

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