The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Do I Weigh Less at the Equator than at the Poles due to "Centrifugal" Force?  (Read 2744 times)

Offline chris

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 5339
  • Thanked: 65 times
  • The Naked Scientist
    • View Profile
    • The Naked Scientists
I was asked this question and I wonder whether anyone has any figures they can put to it please?

Chris


 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
I was asked this question and I wonder whether anyone has any figures they can put to it please?

Chris
The answer to the question is yes, but not only because of centrifugal force, because of pole buckling too.
I found this pictures: 9.78 m/s2 at the Equator and 9.83 m/s2 at the poles.
 

Offline syhprum

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 3821
  • Thanked: 19 times
    • View Profile
May I suggest that if you are buying anything real expensive like polonium 206 or antimatter or vanilla essence you have it weighed out with a scale calibrated against a standard mass with all this variation in 'G' that we have discussed
 

lyner

  • Guest
Yes; a balance rather than a spring.
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Decent analytical balances include test masses to calibrate themselves to avoid this problem. Typically they will weigh 100g to +/- 0.00001g so moving them a few floors up or down the building will influence the calibration.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums