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Author Topic: The science of physical fitness? Tell me how your exercise helps your body?  (Read 10979 times)

Offline Karen W.

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So show me what exercise you do and tell me what parts of your body benefit from this exercise and how?


 

Offline Mark l D

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Absolutely none ... and I will remain so for  6 months.

What benefits? Well my body will learn a new posture in that time.
After that, I can build muscles.

 

Offline Karen W.

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Where do you think your muscle building will take place? So changing your posture is definitely a way to build up muscles you seldom use. it requires changes in the back neck shoulders, basically everywhere. Is there a particular reason you specify 6 months?
 

Offline Mark l D

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I was walking a few km to and from work each day. I realized my knees were not bending - because of car accidents. I realized I needed to use different muscles between my knee and my hips.

I devoted myself to using the knee in the correct way. it took me months and I gave up walking as exercise as it reinforced "the old way" of walking.

At the end of a few months, I was walking the correct way - well better (not perfect) as I had only done the knee to hip ...

Anyway, after I corrected the problem, I needed exercise. The exercise? walking.

Previously - I had adapted to an injury.
I corrected the posture and allowed the injury to move. Then I exercised WITHOUT the injury. I learned to walk again.

Two years later, I could not walk for another month because I changed the the same leg again, this time between knee and ankle. Same thing.

I suspect myself that this latter is the cure for Gout - but that is another story. I was not diagnosed with gout, I was diagnosed with 25% permanent disability.
If I had gout, it is gone, but that is also true of 25% permanent disability.

Exercise reinforced the posture which adapted to injury.
But if you wish to get rid of the injury - you have to stop exercise - deal with the problem, and then re-introduce the same exercises (or others) again.

This latest? I have introduced a twist in every single bone in my body from ankles to neck to fingers. it has taken 18 months so far. You can imagine the cost I am sure.
I am still changing. It is not time to exercise - well not as a regime anyway.


 

Offline Karen W.

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Yes I can imagine the cost! How does one introduce a twist to every single bone in their body from the neck to the fingers. It sounds like paralysis? I hope it gets better soon!
 

Offline Mark l D

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I began in the lumbar region - biofeedback to relax the muscles between each vertebrae and the hip (both sides). It took a while and suddenly some vertebrae were able to move.

as each vertebrae was able to move, the ones above it had to move also (they balance) so they had to change also... and the ones they pull upon below had to move also - so they had to change.

Everything is in balance, you change one part - the rest have to change.
And the rib cage is the worse - you have so many interactive muscles. When you rotate a vertebrae in the thoracic, you also have to twist the entire rib cage.

Worse, it is not one simple change, you change, you develop a new balance, then you have to go back and do it again - little by little.

Imagine a mobile ... and you have to change one relationship within it.
You do a change, wait for everything to stop reacting, and do another change.

 

Offline Karen W.

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Are you in a wheelchair, or are you doing these exercises just as a way to just get your body into balance as you feel it is out of wack.. I honestly do not really understand your posts as well as I might if you would give me some more background on what and why you do this.. How do you make these changes.

Do you intend to sit or lie in one place for 6 months as a form of exercise??? Please explain?
 

Offline Mark l D

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Start - car accidents - two of, five years apart.
Outcome, soft tissue damage and the prognosis of 25% permanently disabled.
This implies constant pain, head bent over, difficulty in walking up steps and in constant need of intervention as you are constantly in pain.

"permanent" is doctor lingo which is to swear to a court of law that this sort of injury will never correct itself - and specifies the level of restriction of movement which it will impact on my life.

Most people except for the very very very rare ones never recover.
You can see people like I was any day, they have their heads pulled forward, they walk with stiff legs, they seem "stiff" and they are in constant pain.
more advanced degradation is when they walk, it seems they stop half way through a step - do a weird shift in the body, then continue the step.

For me - I would hit people instead of twisting. Hitting people hurt me as it jolted me. But twisting hurt me more than such a jolt. I did not take any pleasure in jostling people ... but the alternative was worse.  >:(

Remedial care is usually physiotherapists or chiropractors ... and pain and muscular medication.
And people with such injuries usually end up in surgery with hip and knee replacements or something similar - after some decades.

I was going to a chiropractor on average once per month for almost 20 years.

I developed my own theories on the back - and these theories allowed me to recover. I am not yet well, I am ONLY to the point where i am no longer classed as permanently disabled.
There is a lot of back problems without such a class of "permanent injury."

For the last 15 months - I have been working on RSI (see the model of RSI revisited in new idea section) and this requires me to introduce rotation into the body.

There are three movements to the body - compression movements like walking ... where the body is compressed by gravity.

There are tension movements like the arms. Imagine picking up something heavy and your hand or fingers detach from the body because the weight is too much for the joint? Picture a crane with a big cable and the weight is actually carried by the cable ... in this case into the shoulders and spine.  Thus the weight is carried by the cable, not the joint.
Ligaments ...

Finally there is the ability to rotate - a very important movement.
Every single vertebrae in your spine, plus your legs and arms - is designed for rotation and twisting.
Don't you think that this movement is VERY important to the body if it is programmed into almost every single joint?
And my chiropractor could not even identify the problem, let alone find a solution. (I have a great relationship with my chiropractor - we talked about it)

As exercise is designed to strengthen WHAT YOU ARE DOING ... it does not fix the underlying problem, only allow you to be strong in adapting to the problems that exist.

This is why exercise does not fix people with back problems - going back to the prediction of the medial personnel as to permanently disabled.
Physiotherapists are very good at rehabilitating muscles, very good at strengthening what you do ... and useless to fix underlying causes.

I am so glad for the experts in the physiotherapy world that the moment I have changed and dealt with the underlying problems, I will be going to such experts in a flash to rehabilitate me.

But to get well, I have to change ...
Where the body tightens, I relax.
Where it adapts, I try to use the body the way it was supposed to be used.
Where it restricts movement, I restore movement.

And most importantly - I reprogram the brain so I change the way I move.

Right now ... I am going through a crisis as my body has a way of moving. This is a "poor way" as it restricts movement, and tightens many things - and puts strain on the spine.
I am training it to take another position - another posture.
When this is finished, I wait longer for the joints to rebuild slightly before going first to a physiotherapist to help me rehabilitate - with a secondary goal of "in six months, I want to go to a gym for my health's sake."

I have spent 8 years recovering so far. In ten, I should be fully recovered. One more year preparation (six more months on causes, six months on rehabilitation), one year in a gym to build muscles, some of which have not been used for twenty years.

Not so bad after twenty years of pain and suffering.

Slowly is the key. You cannot speed recovery.
I learned THAT lesson with pain and suffering.
 

Offline Simulated

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Hum. Lets see here

Over the whole course of the year I

1.) Run the 100 meter, 1 mile, and 2 mile in track
2.) Just randomly run around the block or to town
3.) Go to the lake and swim/tube/float
4.) Swim in general
5.) Play Jv and Varsity Soccer
6.) Shoot the basketball around at my house
7.) Work out (with all the machines and stuff and then sit ups and push ups)
8.) And there is more but I"ll stop there lol
 

Offline Karen W.

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Start - car accidents - two of, five years apart.
Outcome, soft tissue damage and the prognosis of 25% permanently disabled.
This implies constant pain, head bent over, difficulty in walking up steps and in constant need of intervention as you are constantly in pain.

"permanent" is doctor lingo which is to swear to a court of law that this sort of injury will never correct itself - and specifies the level of restriction of movement which it will impact on my life.

Most people except for the very very very rare ones never recover.
You can see people like I was any day, they have their heads pulled forward, they walk with stiff legs, they seem "stiff" and they are in constant pain.
more advanced degradation is when they walk, it seems they stop half way through a step - do a weird shift in the body, then continue the step.

For me - I would hit people instead of twisting. Hitting people hurt me as it jolted me. But twisting hurt me more than such a jolt. I did not take any pleasure in jostling people ... but the alternative was worse.  >:(

Remedial care is usually physiotherapists or chiropractors ... and pain and muscular medication.
And people with such injuries usually end up in surgery with hip and knee replacements or something similar - after some decades.

I was going to a chiropractor on average once per month for almost 20 years.

I developed my own theories on the back - and these theories allowed me to recover. I am not yet well, I am ONLY to the point where i am no longer classed as permanently disabled.
There is a lot of back problems without such a class of "permanent injury."

For the last 15 months - I have been working on RSI (see the model of RSI revisited in new idea section) and this requires me to introduce rotation into the body.

There are three movements to the body - compression movements like walking ... where the body is compressed by gravity.

There are tension movements like the arms. Imagine picking up something heavy and your hand or fingers detach from the body because the weight is too much for the joint? Picture a crane with a big cable and the weight is actually carried by the cable ... in this case into the shoulders and spine.  Thus the weight is carried by the cable, not the joint.
Ligaments ...

Finally there is the ability to rotate - a very important movement.
Every single vertebrae in your spine, plus your legs and arms - is designed for rotation and twisting.
Don't you think that this movement is VERY important to the body if it is programmed into almost every single joint?
And my chiropractor could not even identify the problem, let alone find a solution. (I have a great relationship with my chiropractor - we talked about it)

As exercise is designed to strengthen WHAT YOU ARE DOING ... it does not fix the underlying problem, only allow you to be strong in adapting to the problems that exist.

This is why exercise does not fix people with back problems - going back to the prediction of the medial personnel as to permanently disabled.
Physiotherapists are very good at rehabilitating muscles, very good at strengthening what you do ... and useless to fix underlying causes.

I am so glad for the experts in the physiotherapy world that the moment I have changed and dealt with the underlying problems, I will be going to such experts in a flash to rehabilitate me.

But to get well, I have to change ...
Where the body tightens, I relax.
Where it adapts, I try to use the body the way it was supposed to be used.
Where it restricts movement, I restore movement.

And most importantly - I reprogram the brain so I change the way I move.

Right now ... I am going through a crisis as my body has a way of moving. This is a "poor way" as it restricts movement, and tightens many things - and puts strain on the spine.
I am training it to take another position - another posture.
When this is finished, I wait longer for the joints to rebuild slightly before going first to a physiotherapist to help me rehabilitate - with a secondary goal of "in six months, I want to go to a gym for my health's sake."

I have spent 8 years recovering so far. In ten, I should be fully recovered. One more year preparation (six more months on causes, six months on rehabilitation), one year in a gym to build muscles, some of which have not been used for twenty years.

Not so bad after twenty years of pain and suffering.

Slowly is the key. You cannot speed recovery.
I learned THAT lesson with pain and suffering.


That is an incredible story and I wish you the best of luck in your last year of recovery and I hope it brings you all the results you are expecting from your years of reprogramming and retraining your muscles and how you use them. Thank you for sharing your experiences thus far and I hope you enjoy the forum.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Hum. Lets see here

Over the whole course of the year I

1.) Run the 100 meter, 1 mile, and 2 mile in track
2.) Just randomly run around the block or to town
3.) Go to the lake and swim/tube/float
4.) Swim in general
5.) Play Jv and Varsity Soccer
6.) Shoot the basketball around at my house
7.) Work out (with all the machines and stuff and then sit ups and push ups)
8.) And there is more but I"ll stop there lol

Ryan I think you must be quite a good athlete. That is good that you do so many different things. Looks like you do tons with your leg muscles. Arms and back also.. Thats very good.. Do you ever do any Isometrics?

 

Offline Simulated

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Yeah. I'm purdy much a skinny ripped kid. lol.

And what's that?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Where you basically work against your own muscle strength pushing pulling etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isometrics

Isometric exercise
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Isometrics)
Jump to: navigation, search

Isometric exercise or "isometrics" are a type of strength training in which the joint angle and muscle length do not change during contraction (compared to concentric or eccentric contractions, called isotonic movements). Isometrics are done in static positions, rather than being dynamic through a range of motion. The joint and muscle are either worked against an immovable force (overcoming isometric) or are held in a static position while opposed by resistance (yielding isometric).
Contents
[hide]

    * 1 Definition
    * 2 Resistance in isometric exercises
    * 3 History
    * 4 Isometrics today
    * 5 Medical uses
    * 6 Isometric exercises in comparison with dynamic exercises
    * 7 Isometrics and NASA
    * 8 See also
    * 9 References
    * 10 External links
          o 10.1 Public domain books on isometric exercises

[edit] Definition

Isometric exercise is a form of exercise involving the static contraction of a muscle without any visible movement in the angle of the joint. This is reflected in the name; the term "isometric" combines the prefix "iso" (same) with "metric" (distance), meaning that in these exercises the length of the muscle does not change,[1] as compared to isotonic contractions in which the contraction strength does not change but the joint angle does.

[edit] Resistance in isometric exercises

Resistance in isometric exercises typically involve contractions of the muscle using:

    * the body's own muscle (e.g., pressing the palms together in front of the body)
    * structural items (e.g., pushing against a door frame).
    * free weights, weights machines or elastic equipment (e.g. holding a weight in a fixed position)
    * pressure plate type equipment that have a digital readout of maximal force.

Depending on the goal of the exercise, the exertion can be maximal, or sub-maximal.
« Last Edit: 13/01/2008 19:16:36 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Simulated

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Yeah anything to feel the burn I guess?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Yeah.. I have never been one for strenuous exercise.. It always landed me in the hospital!
 

Offline Simulated

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I wanna be looking grate forever. SO whatever it takes.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Good Job.. Just do it safely!
 

Offline Simulated

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We got a treadmill!
 

Offline i am bored

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loads of : squats, deadlifts, leglifts, benchpresses, incline presses, conditioning (by that I mean repeated punches and kicks into the stomach, legs, groin, etc..) and what I get in return.... larger
biceps, smaller gut, loss in weight, stronger legs, and an extremely higher tolerance of pain. that last part is optional
« Last Edit: 21/01/2008 04:07:16 by i am bored »
 

Offline Simulated

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sweet. i like what i do :)
 

Offline Karen W.

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We got a treadmill!

YAYYYYYYYYYYY! Have you been using it?
 

Offline Simulated

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Yup. The max speed is 10 mph and its easyy lol.

10 percent or something like that incline.
 

Offline Simulated

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Soccer workouts now

3 times a week for like 2 hours. GOnna be ready for track and ripped :)
 

Offline muaazab

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Exercise is very good thing for body's external as well as internal health. It must be in routine and normal. Excess of exercise may dissolve your body cells abnormally which could be harmful for body.
« Last Edit: 06/02/2008 11:23:34 by muaazab »
 

Offline Karen W.

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loads of : squats, deadlifts, leglifts, benchpresses, incline presses, conditioning (by that I mean repeated punches and kicks into the stomach, legs, groin, etc..) and what I get in return.... larger
biceps, smaller gut, loss in weight, stronger legs, and an extremely higher tolerance of pain. that last part is optional

I lifted weights when I was young and loved legg presses.. But I am far from that stage of my life now.. I am lucky to be able to press a shirt these days! LOL!
 

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