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Author Topic: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?  (Read 10879 times)

Offline i am bored

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i heard that they put metal flakes in the tattoo ink, and metal conducts electricity. so lets say that i had a tattoo on my torso... lets make it a bullseye. if i was shocked there by a stun gun would it be worse than being shocked in the same place without the tattoo
« Last Edit: 07/08/2009 19:29:32 by chris »


 

Offline JnA

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #1 on: 17/01/2008 05:22:40 »
I doubt the effects would be enough to notice with any real significance.
 

another_someone

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #2 on: 17/01/2008 11:32:29 »
As JnA says, it is not going to make any difference.

The shock is from the current going between the full distance between the two electrodes they fire at your body, and having a small piece of metal on the surface near where one electrode hits your body will simply be like having a very slightly larger electrode, but will not make any noticeable difference over the total conduction path.

In any case, stun guns (I assume you are talking about tazers) are electronically adjusted to ensure the same amount of current goes through the body no matter where they hit (they have to take account of much more significant differences, such as whether they hit bare skin, or have to penetrate through clothing).
 

Offline RD

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #3 on: 17/01/2008 15:50:05 »
The metal particles could cause problems with MRI scans ...

Quote
Well, it appears that about 20 years ago and further, tattoo ink was sometimes comprised of small fragments of metal as well as other ingredients. This was long before tattoos were ever regulated and before more serious thought was given as to the safety of tattoo ink ingredients. Some MRI patients who have had tattoos that dated back far enough to have received ink that contained metal bits have reported slight discomfort to severe pain during an MRI scan.

It is purported that the reason for this was that the magnetic force pulled on the metallic fragments so violently that it caused a burning sensation in the location of the tattoo. I have heard some theorize that this may have been caused by built up friction between the particles, and some say that the magnetic force was actually tearing at the skin as the fragments were pulled and attempted to actually break away from the skin. I donít know which, if either, is true; however, even if there is no pain at all, these fragments can cause artifacts, which is the technical term used for distortions in MRI scans. Artifacts can render a scanned image useless, requiring that the procedure be done again or even an alternate procedure be used to acquire accurate information. So, at the very least, you could be stuck with a very expensive bill for nothing -if, of course, your tattoo actually contains these metal particles.

http://tattoo.about.com/cs/tatfaq/a/mri_scan.htm

« Last Edit: 17/01/2008 15:51:45 by RD »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #4 on: 17/01/2008 19:17:52 »
Why would anyone put fragments of metal in tatoo ink?
There are just 3 magnetic metals at body temperature. Cobalt and Nickel have long been associated with toxicity. Iron rusts.
Is there any direct evidence of metals in the pigments used?
 

Offline RD

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #5 on: 19/01/2008 10:50:43 »
Why would anyone put fragments of metal in tatoo ink?
There are just 3 magnetic metals at body temperature. Cobalt and Nickel have long been associated with toxicity. Iron rusts.
Is there any direct evidence of metals in the pigments used?

Quote
Dyes and pigments
A wide range of dyes and pigments can be used in tattoos, from inorganic materials like titanium dioxide and iron oxides to carbon black, azo dyes, and acridine, quinoline, phthalocyanine and naphthol derivates, dyes made from ash, and other mixtures.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattoo

Tattoos are often improvised in prison where plenty of iron oxide is available from metal bars  [xx(]
« Last Edit: 19/01/2008 10:58:22 by RD »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #6 on: 19/01/2008 17:32:17 »
Iron oxide is not a metal, it's an oxide.
 

Offline neilep

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #7 on: 20/01/2008 14:33:53 »
Not too sure if this is relevant but MythBusters....did a test concerning tattoos and MRI scans...titled " Can a tattoo explode in an MRI scan?"......the result was that the tattoo had NO effect on the scan whatsoever.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #8 on: 21/01/2008 14:53:21 »
Iron oxide is not a metal, it's an oxide.

Iron oxide is affected by magnetic fields: audio/video tape uses this principle.
« Last Edit: 21/01/2008 16:11:51 by RD »
 

Offline Ruth

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #9 on: 23/01/2008 12:08:29 »
Apparently there is mercury in tattoo inks. Used as preservative. Be careful where you go.
http://www.mercuryexposure.org/index.php?page_id=29 [nofollow]
 

Offline rosy

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #10 on: 23/01/2008 18:01:08 »
I imagine that it would make more difference how sweaty you were... since sweat is salty and will conduct current better than skin.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #11 on: 23/01/2008 20:57:10 »
"Iron oxide is affected by magnetic fields: audio/video tape uses this principle."
No, some oxides of iron are magnetic (and some tapes use chromium oxide).
As it happens I have been asked to analyse tatoo inks in the past (I have done some odd analyses). One of them had very high levels of iron, but I checked and it still was not magnetic.
Anyway, since the original question was about electrical conductivity and iron oxides are all poor conductors I still think the magnetic properties of iron oxides are nothing to do with the original question.
A tattoo made from rust might be pretty nasty and it would almost certainly be magnetic so it might mess up an MRI scan but it wouldn't conduct electricity so it wouldn't affect a taser.
I gather that chainmail does a good job.
 

kurt120

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #12 on: 06/08/2009 03:25:47 »
The shock is from the current going between the full distance between the two electrodes they fire at your body, and having a small piece of metal on the surface near where one electrode hits your body will simply be like having a very slightly larger electrode, but will not make any noticeable difference over the total conduction path. The metal particles could cause problems with MRI scans ...
 

Offline Variola

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #13 on: 06/08/2009 08:57:04 »
There hasn't been metal particles in tattoo ink for many many years.

With regards to mercury, it extremely difficult to assess what sort of exposure one has had to mercury as its in the background so much, and also individuals very with their exposure.It the same principle when he worry over thimerosal was popular. As far as I am aware, tattoo ink no longer uses mercury as a preservative.
 

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Re: Do tattoos make you more vulnerable to electric shocks?
« Reply #13 on: 06/08/2009 08:57:04 »

 

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