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Author Topic: Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?  (Read 9958 times)

Offline chels

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Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?
« on: 22/01/2008 22:59:32 »
This is quite random, anyway there is something being bugging me.
The whole point in the inflammatory response is to heal the site of injury right? And all the processes involved initiate a load of other processes too, which in turn activate more processes and cascades and well and...well, the whole matrix of "the inflammatory response"
What gets to me is - WHY do medical practitioners like to prescribe people high doses of anti-inflammatories, when they have other injuries? For example, my grandmothers friend suffers from leg ulcers and arthritis. Her doctor treats her arthritis with co-dydramol and Diclofenac.
This Diclofenac, i read up on it - and it seems to interfere with pathways that lead to the availability of leukotrienes and prostaglandins.
This is pretty scary, we all know all the pro-inflammatory response things that prostaglandins do.
This particular old biddie also has this topical ointment that she seems to be addicted to - voltarol gel. Now, that contains Diclofenac also. So she is getting the maximum oral dose, along with half the tube of diclofenac absorbed into her skin every day, its no wonder her leg ulcers won't heal, at least thats what i'm thinking. Obviously she needs a painkiller for her arthritis, but why not prescribe co-codamol and eliminate the diclofenac? more codeine, she will be stoned out her box for a while as her legs heal, possibly.
i also read a few times about the reduction in formation of leukotrienes - now aren't these important chemotactins for neutrophils?
lower level of these, lower number of attracted neutrophils, lower healing time.
i just can't seem to find any articles or proper solid information on this, i find it pretty scary that these NSAID's are so readily available to people who could be taking them for a number of reasons not expecting, e.g, the pills that keep the pain from the abcess away are also interfering with its healing process!
Shouldn't these things come with some kind of warning on them!? Maybe i'm just reading waay too much into this.
thing is - i know inflammation is not "the healing process" in itself but it does work with other methods to promote healing, if you look at the very end process it involves removal of the pathogen and restoration of the damaged tissue to its normal homeostasis, they are not two completely separate processes, all the involved steps interlink.
What i am basically saying is yes, the NSAID's reduce inflammation because of their inhibition of prostaglandins, (which makes me wonder what happens to the NON-cleaved arachidonic acid? Hmm, more leukotrienes possibly?? i'll leave that for another day)
but remembering that prostaglandins have effects on almost every step in the inflammatory response, i mean they are involved with vasodilation, platelet aggregation, cell growth (repairing mechanism, no?), smooth muscle cell constriction and/or dilation depending on type i think.... they reduce the concentrations of the chemicals involved therefore consequently defeat the entire purpose and effect of the inflammatory response - which would (possibly, maybe) result in a reduced ability to fight infectious agents and remove pathogens.

i could be talking utter garbage here, it was just a random thought.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2008 17:27:01 by chris »


 

Offline RD

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Re: Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?
« Reply #1 on: 08/07/2008 19:09:49 »
For example, my grandmothers friend suffers from leg ulcers and arthritis.

The reluctance of these leg ulcers to heal is probably due to inadequate circulation rather than any medications the patient is taking.
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/footandlegulcers.htm
« Last Edit: 08/07/2008 19:13:30 by RD »
 

Offline techsquirrel

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Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?
« Reply #2 on: 28/02/2009 18:27:10 »
Just a note that my father's doc prescribed Diclofenac after Pop pinched a couple of lumbar discs while mowing. Pop took the Diclofenac exactly as prescribed for three weeks and stopped as soon as he discovered some lack of control in his tongue. Within 10 months Pop was dead, at age 82, of ALS. The ALS started from the tongue and throat and worked its way outward. My grandfather died at age 96 of old age, and Pop was healthy as a horse his whole life. A Johns Hopkins study I located online was very, very cautionary about Diclofenac use as it crosses the brain blood barrier and has very different effects inside the brain than it does in the rest of the body. Pop and I both felt it likely that the Diclofenac had been the causative agent to the ALS.
 

Offline RD

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Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?
« Reply #3 on: 28/02/2009 20:41:44 »
Possible alternate scenario: the back pain was directly or indirectly due to ALS,
 i.e. neurological disease predated the Diclofenac use so the medication was not causative.

Quote
The onset of ALS may be so subtle that the symptoms are frequently overlooked. The earliest symptoms are obvious weakness and/or muscle atrophy. This is followed by twitching, cramping, or stiffness of affected muscles
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis#Initial_symptoms
« Last Edit: 28/02/2009 20:52:54 by RD »
 

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Does using NSAID suppress the immune system?
« Reply #3 on: 28/02/2009 20:41:44 »

 

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