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Author Topic: Banging your shin  (Read 3362 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Banging your shin
« on: 01/02/2008 17:49:24 »
or elbow, etc, etc. Why does it hurt more when it's cold?


 

Offline i am bored

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Banging your shin
« Reply #1 on: 03/02/2008 03:35:02 »
i dont know... i was climbing down a ladder and it slipped and banged my shin pretty hard and i wanted to shoot someone
 

Offline JnA

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Banging your shin
« Reply #2 on: 03/02/2008 07:30:06 »
I would suggest vasoconstriction would have something to do with it.

 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Banging your shin
« Reply #3 on: 03/02/2008 13:17:41 »
I would suggest vasoconstriction would have something to do with it.



I was wondering that myself. However, vasoconstriction reduces the blood supply and, as far as I'm aware, that causes numbness rather than increased sensitivity.
 

Offline Carol-A

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Banging your shin
« Reply #4 on: 04/02/2008 07:27:30 »
I don't know, and I'm not even sure it is true that it would hurt more in the cold, but. if it does, I could take a guess! When it is cold, you reduce the blood flow to the surface in order to preserve heat. As there is only a thin layer of tissues over your shin, reducing the blood flow will reduce the reduce the small cushioning effect that that tissue has, increasing the pressure on the nerves etc
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Banging your shin
« Reply #5 on: 04/02/2008 07:39:12 »
Oh Carol, I am but a fool - I should have worked that out for myself. Thank you. It sounds very feasible.
 

Offline JnA

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Banging your shin
« Reply #6 on: 04/02/2008 12:21:29 »
When it is cold, you reduce the blood flow to the surface in order to preserve heat. As there is only a thin layer of tissues over your shin, reducing the blood flow will reduce the reduce the small cushioning effect that that tissue has, increasing the pressure on the nerves etc

aye, vasoconstriction 
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Banging your shin
« Reply #7 on: 04/02/2008 13:19:15 »
When it is cold, you reduce the blood flow to the surface in order to preserve heat. As there is only a thin layer of tissues over your shin, reducing the blood flow will reduce the reduce the small cushioning effect that that tissue has, increasing the pressure on the nerves etc

aye, vasoconstriction 

Yes indeed, JnA. I hadn't considered the aspect that Carol mentioned. I apologise.
 

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Banging your shin
« Reply #7 on: 04/02/2008 13:19:15 »

 

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