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Author Topic: Can anyone Identify this?  (Read 40202 times)

Offline tedstruk

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Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #50 on: 13/03/2008 23:48:10 »
shape suggests garnet...

Garnets are soft, come in a variety of colors, right size too.

Rare green ones like this are valuable....

I bet you have a garnet...

It could be ?---
http://www.toledotel.com/~ope/salepics/FMIndexA/lithicID.htm#submit1 [nofollow]
 

Offline JimBob

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Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #51 on: 14/03/2008 00:20:58 »

Garnets are soft, .....


I don't think so. Garnets are almost equal to or equal (or greater) in hardness to quartz.
 
 

Offline Bass

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Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #52 on: 14/03/2008 01:06:14 »

Garnets are soft, .....




I don't think so. Garnets are almost equal to or equal (or greater) in hardness to quartz.
 

Not only are they hard, but they have one of the highest crystallization forces of any mineral, which is why garnets are so commonly found as dodecahedral crystals
 

Offline JimBob

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Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #53 on: 14/03/2008 10:49:48 »
And used as abrasives as well.
 

Offline seraglio

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Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #54 on: 28/04/2008 18:00:17 »
I also live and work in Connecticut.  What this rock sample looks like to me is a piece of greenish slag from one of the many old iron foundries present here during the latter 1700's.  So much iron ore was mined and smelted in Connecticut that the entire state was deforested and the iron industry gave rise to famous place names such as Valley Forge. 

All along the river banks of the NW and NE part of the state can be found these green/tan multicolored slag rocks or floats.  I have found mountains of overgrown slag while wandering through the woods in old mining areas.  I have quite a collection of similar stones and the one in the pictures.  The iron smelters and foundries were always built near running water for power purposes.
 

Offline AndrewJ

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Re: Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #55 on: 10/02/2012 17:45:19 »
Well, it's been 4 years since I posted this, and reading back on my comments is quite amusing. I still have the rock mentioned in the original post, and it's still a mystery to me. I've looked up different images of iron slag, and it seems far too colorful and naturally crystalline to be anything like that.

Here's another picture, if anyone is still interested:

It doesn't really do the color much justice due to the lighting, but the original pictures are close enough.
 

Offline Bass

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Re: Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #56 on: 18/02/2012 05:22:51 »
Possibly Beryl- lots of pegmatites in that part of the country.  Can you scratch the green mineral with an knife?
 

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Re: Can anyone Identify this?
« Reply #56 on: 18/02/2012 05:22:51 »

 

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