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Author Topic: How are metal hydrides used to store energy?  (Read 15067 times)

another_someone

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Re: How are metal hydrides used to store energy?
« Reply #25 on: 28/02/2008 21:41:33 »
I am saying that we need to do something about it soon. The only reasonable something is to use less energy by actually consuming less. It cannot have any adverse effect on out environment so it is a safe direction in which to amble as the truck is on the horizon.

And I am saying there is no such thing as a safe option - all options carry risks, whether you see them or not.  You may amble out of the way of the truck and walk over a precipice.

At least in Europe, human activity is such a dominant part of the environment, that simply doing less will also have an effect on the environment.  Many species, from domestic animals, to urban foxes, seagulls and pigeons, to rats, are all dependent on human activity; so reduced human activity will effect them too.  Ofcourse, reduced production of many medicines may assist many human pathogens.  Whatever you do will have winners and losers, and even doing less will have winners and losers, so the notion that it is a low risk option is naive.

Aside from that, from my own perspective, I have no particular direct interest in what has adverse or beneficial effects on the 'Environment', only on what had benefits to mankind; so if one can show that killing half the people on the planet may in some way benefit the 'Environment', I know which side I am on in that conflict of interest, and it is not the side of the 'Environment'.

I am also assuming that there is not enough juice in the efficiency lemon to make any significant difference.

I would agree with that.

Reducing productivity would not be a popular strategy. In fact it is probably impossible to think of it as a likely, voluntary course of action, certainly not for a developing nation. That means heavy persuasion on the part of some powerful nation or group. That's where my war scenario comes in.

But the problem is that war will be won by the more productive society, not by the less productive society (war is one of the greatest consumers of resources, so if you have a society that does not have the mechanisms in place to allocate massive resources to war, you will lose the war, and will not be able to make your point).

Ofcourse, being on the losing side of a war, you have magnanimously given your life and well being in order to allow the winner more resources, those resources you may have otherwise used to further your life, and now are available to the other side to offset their shortfall having had to consume so much resource in fighting the war against you.
« Last Edit: 28/02/2008 21:44:17 by another_someone »
 

lyner

  • Guest
Re: How are metal hydrides used to store energy?
« Reply #26 on: 28/02/2008 22:08:42 »
So it's a lose lose situation.
Time to find a survivalist cave somewhere, I guess.
 

another_someone

  • Guest
Re: How are metal hydrides used to store energy?
« Reply #27 on: 29/02/2008 00:41:05 »
So it's a lose lose situation.

In the long term, yes; the question is how one judges the timescale for this lose-lose situation to arise; and I am in that regard more optimistic than many.

There are ofcourse more short term problems regarding global shifts in the political and economic balance of power from the traditionally wealthy West to the newer economies in Asia, and this is without doubt painful; but I don't see this as a matter of running out of resources, only a matter of who has the power to grab the lion's share of them.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: How are metal hydrides used to store energy?
« Reply #27 on: 29/02/2008 00:41:05 »

 

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