The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Vacuum Fluctuations  (Read 3936 times)

Offline Supercryptid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 606
    • View Profile
    • http://www.angelfire.com/sc2/Trunko
Vacuum Fluctuations
« on: 26/02/2008 04:01:25 »
I have a question regarding vacuum fluctuations (the sea of virtual particles that permeates space everywhere).

Is the structure of vacuum fluctuations deterministic, completely random, or somewhere between? Does the structure of the vacuum at some given time (say T1) determine what its structure will be at some later time (say T2)? Will the structure of the vacuum at T2 be determined completely by its structure at T1 (due to cause-and-effect interactions between the virtual particles that compose it)? Is the structure of the vacuum fluctuations at T2 completely unrelated to the its structure at T1? Is it determined perhaps, not absolutely, but approximately or probabilistically by the structure at T1?


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #1 on: 26/02/2008 07:56:31 »
As far as I know, any type of virtual particle can pop up anywhere. Not only any type of particle, but any type of particle with any energy level except that of the real particle. That would seem to imply that the fluctuations are random.

However, there is always the possibility that there is an underlying mechanism; say, 1 that prevents the same type of virtual particle appearing at the same point on successive occasions, or that determines the energy level. In fact, there could be all kinds of interconnected restrictions.

We just don't know enough about it yet to know the answer. If the answer lies in Planck length strings, or extra dimensions of space, we may possibly never know for certain because of their inaccessibility to experimentation.
 

another_someone

  • Guest
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #2 on: 26/02/2008 17:08:05 »
I suspect the answer is that anything is possible, but not all things are equally probable.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #3 on: 26/02/2008 17:59:01 »
I suspect the answer is that anything is possible, but not all things are equally probable.

I think that's what I was trying to say. Kinda. Sort of(ish).
 

Offline Sorcerer

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #4 on: 26/02/2008 19:11:49 »

I Does the structure of the vacuum at some given time (say T1) determine what its structure will be at some later time (say T2)?

I suppose, the situation would be more difficult. Probably, the structure of the vacuum at time T2 is determined by structure at all time before. (I mean it would be not Markov process)
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #5 on: 26/02/2008 21:15:28 »
Do you think it may be more of an Ito Process?
 

Offline Sorcerer

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #6 on: 27/02/2008 14:59:50 »
Do you think it may be more of an Ito Process?

I think any process is not Markov process in the Universe. Therefore it should be remembered this fact when we work with a random process.



 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Vacuum Fluctuations
« Reply #6 on: 27/02/2008 14:59:50 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums