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Author Topic: 400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.  (Read 14828 times)

Offline Bored chemist

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400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #25 on: 28/02/2008 19:37:52 »
"106. Since 1978, 37 people have died by Vending Machine's falling on them. 13 people are killed annually. All this while trying to shake merchandise out of them. 113 people have been injured."
OK, so the guy's gead; how do they know what he was trying to do? In most casses I guess it's a fair assumption but, unless there was someone ther to keep notes...
And, btw, since the key with a pound symbol on it makes a why does anyone call anything else a pound key?
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #26 on: 28/02/2008 20:00:56 »
"The whole nine yards"

The origin of the phrase is not known.

One of the most common explanations is that it dates from the Second World War, where "nine yards" was the length of an aircraft machine-gun ammunition belt, and to "go the full nine yards" was to use it up entirely. However, machine-gun ammunition belts were not nine yards long, and the expression has been reliably dated back only to early 1964, in U.S. Space Program slang.[1] It was also apparently popular among Air Force personnel in Vietnam.[2] By November 1967 it was recorded in use in the U.S. Army, likewise from Vietnam, and by mid-1969 was appearing in newspaper advertisements in the United States.[3] The first citation in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1970, in the magazine Word Watching.[4]

Whilst no written occurrences have been found predating 1964, a number of anecdotal recollections suggest the phrase dates back at least a further decade, potentially into the 1940s. One of the better-documented cases is provided by Captain Richard Stratton, who recorded in 2005 that he encountered the phrase during naval flight training in Florida in July 1955 as part of a ribald story about a mythical Scotsman.[5] It has been suggested that there is strong circumstantial evidence it was not in general use in 1961, as Ralph Boston set a world record for the long jump that year at 27 feet, or nine yards, but no news report has been found that made any reference to the term, suggesting that journalists were unaware of it or did not regard it as common enough to use as a pun.[6]

Of course, popular etymology has risen to the challenge; a vast number of explanations have been put forward to explain the purported origins of the term. Suggested sources have been as diverse as the volume of graves or concrete mixers; the length of bridal veils, kilts, burial shrouds, bolts of cloth, or saris; American football; ritual disembowelment; and the structure of certain sailing vessels. Little documentary evidence has ever surfaced supporting any of these, and many labour under the significant disadvantage of being several centuries earlier than the first recorded use of the term.


(Wikipedia)
 

Offline Simulated

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400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #27 on: 22/03/2008 14:51:49 »
401. My Microwave Cooks in the Key of f#. (I have no life) ha
 

Offline Supercryptid

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400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #28 on: 22/03/2008 20:23:23 »
"69. The pop you hear when you crack your knuckles is actually a bubble of gas burning."

Actually, I don't think it is completely understood what mechanism lies behind the sound of knuckle-cracking, but I'm pretty sure that nothing is "burning" in the process.

"293. Elephants are the only animals that can't jump."

What about snails? Or sponges? Or millipedes?

"297. In the last 4000 years, no new animals have been domesticated."

Not true. In 1959, an experiment used to domesticate silver foxes was started in the Soviet Union. The project successfully produced domesticated foxes.

"326. A goldfish has a memory span of three seconds."

This was disproven on Mythbusters.
 

Offline Elliot-the-train.

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400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #29 on: 19/04/2008 15:50:34 »
61. When you sneeze, air and particles travel through the nostrils at speeds over100 mph. During this time, all bodily functions stop, including your heart, contributing to the impossibility of keeping one's eyes open during a sneeze.

You can keep your eyes open, was also disproven on mythbusters ;)
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

400 Facts, all four topics now merged in to one.
« Reply #29 on: 19/04/2008 15:50:34 »

 

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