The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: So, what do you think I have?  (Read 4118 times)

Offline Cloudi

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
So, what do you think I have?
« on: 09/03/2008 03:32:52 »
I know these are probably all too cliche around these places like "Oh my god I'm diiiieeeiiiing!" or "I think I'm crazy, cause I twitch a lot and think of killing people." but I'm not joking around here. I'm not just making up symptoms to get false sympathy, ehich I doubt the people who do realize they won't get. I'm really asking your opinion here. So please take it seriously.

I'm naturally anti-social. That's a good way to start out. I've always noticed it. A general dislike of other people, anaylizing them up in a minute and shuting them out. I don't want interaction with others, and other people don't seem to understand. I'm constantly bored, waning through phases of intrest, as I call them. One week I'll be completely obsessed and focused on something, the next I'm bored of life and mindlessly trying to find something to fill up that gap again. Coming with my dislike of people is the dislike of a relationship. I can't say I've ever had one, though I have, I get no feeling out of it whatsoever. I don't think of other peers in a loving type of way, even remotely. I don't understand those that do either. I've always had memory issues, which I'm sure have nothing to do with anything, but today I couldn't remember if and event had really happened or if it was just a dream. I couldn't remember if what I had said to people was in the dream or not, so I'm not sure if I should bring past things up in conversation or not, because I'm not sure if I've actually talked to the person about it. There is family history of manic-depression (sister, father, fathers mother), but after seeing them, I don't think it's that. There is no manic behavior at all. And it's not depression either, because I know what it's like. I basicly go through it once a month, periods making me just a big ball of mood swings. I could actually care less about seeking help to 'change' my outlook on life or to try to fit in with people, I just want a name for it so I can accept it and move on with life ignoring it. That probably sounds extremely counter-productive to the physichian type mind...but I want to know. So please, give me a heads up? If nothing else I can be another puzzle for you to solve so you don't get bored.


 

another_someone

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #1 on: 09/03/2008 03:55:05 »
Very difficult to judge anything at this distance, and I suspect any diagnosis would be as likely wrong as right.

The anti-social aspects, and the obsessive behaviour, might lead me to think of an autistic spectrum disorder (very mild) - but that is merely an idea to look at, and in no way a diagnosis (which, even if I was qualified to give, which I am not, nobody in their right mind would give without seeing you in person, and having a more in depth discussion with you).
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #2 on: 09/03/2008 07:43:31 »

I'm naturally anti-social. That's a good way to start out. I've always noticed it. A general dislike of other people, anaylizing them up in a minute and shuting them out. I don't want interaction with others, and other people don't seem to understand. I'm constantly bored, waning through phases of intrest, as I call them. One week I'll be completely obsessed and focused on something, the next I'm bored of life and mindlessly trying to find something to fill up that gap again. Coming with my dislike of people is the dislike of a relationship..........

Do you see this as a problem? Is it something you want to change?
I, personally, don't see this as a problem at all.
 

Offline Make it Lady

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4050
  • Hands-on fun for everyone!
    • View Profile
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #3 on: 09/03/2008 21:23:26 »
You do need to get a proper diagnosis from a professional. The anti-social part could be an autistic trate but the memory/dream thing is more worrying. I'm worried this aspect may worsen so for your own sake and peace of mind, go and see someone.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #4 on: 10/03/2008 15:54:06 »
Well cloudi has not logged in since he/she posted this topic, but i will reply on the off chance.

It is far too easy to bandy around terms and illnesses like autism, ETC. But, there is nothing wrong with liking your own company, this does not make you anti-social, people may think you are a lonely shitty bastard but who gives a monkeys what others think.

I too have a general dislike of people, even my 'friends', whom i can't stand being with for too long. And as for relationships, again this is all down to pressures from society, we are not meant to be in this jolly little family unit, but we are told you are are weirdo if you are not...bollocks.

A relationship for me, is wanting to have sex again with the same woman on a different day. As a rule sex is just that, and why bother to stick around after....

There is nothing wrong with you cloudi, and i suspect you asked the question after someone asked what was wrong with you.
 

another_someone

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #5 on: 10/03/2008 21:04:13 »
There is nothing wrong with you cloudi, and i suspect you asked the question after someone asked what was wrong with you.

I don't think any of us are qualified to say any such thing, which is why Make It A Lady (Sharon?) suggested he should see somebody for a more appropriate diagnosis.

I don't think any of us are really concerned if it is merely a mild autistic trait (the boundaries between mild autistic spectrum disorders and normal male behaviour is so blurred that it is actually not easy to say which side of the line many people are on).  He asked for a label, and if that turns out to be the label, and if it does not interfere in his everyday life, then there is no problem.

The problem is, that at this distance, none of us have any idea if that is the right label to use, and whether the symptoms are masking something else.  Make It A Lady was particularly concerned with the memory aspects, and if that is getting worse over time, it may be indicative of something else altogether.

It is not appropriate for us to suggest that someone who is worried about their condition not to seek professional advice.  Certainly, give reassurance that the likelihood is that there is nothing of major consequence, but from the remote position we are seeing this, to suggest that we can give such assurances with the certainty that he should not be seeking further advice from someone better qualified than us, would seem to me to be irresponsible of us.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #6 on: 11/03/2008 14:12:46 »
Dear oh dear, did you read what i wrote? Did you understand what i wrote?

Quote
I don't think any of us are qualified to say any such thing, which is why Make It A Lady (Sharon?) suggested he should see somebody for a more appropriate diagnosis.

Did i say i was qualified? Can you please point me towards that part of my post? Now, i expressed an opinion, which is what i feel the OP was asking for. If he/she wanted a medical diagnosis i would like to think that they would go to the doctor for that.

Did i suggest he not follow the advice given? Am i allowed to make my own comments or observations? Is every reply you ever post in all of the boards a "qualified" one?

Quote
It is not appropriate for us to suggest that someone who is worried about their condition not to seek professional advice

Again, please highlight that passage in my reply. What i was asking and suggesting is if the OP thought he had a problem, or if others had suggested that he did.

Quote
suggest that we can give such assurances with the certainty that he should not be seeking further advice from someone better qualified than us, would seem to me to be irresponsible of us.
Yet again, where is the passage in my reply?
Do any of you understand where the OP is coming from? I mean really understand, have lived through it, experienced it?

and there was i thinking TNS was a place for sharing ideas and being able to express your own opinion.


 

another_someone

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #7 on: 11/03/2008 16:13:21 »
Quote
It is not appropriate for us to suggest that someone who is worried about their condition not to seek professional advice

Again, please highlight that passage in my reply. What i was asking and suggesting is if the OP thought he had a problem, or if others had suggested that he did.

Sorry if I misunderstood your reply, but your comment did say:

There is nothing wrong with you cloudi

If you had phrased this as simply "I don't believe there is anything wrong with you", it would have made it clearer that this was a personal opinion rather than a statement of fact as you saw it.

You cannot simply assume that someone else, particularly someone who is not familiar with your background and expertise, will come along and read that as "this guy clearly does not know what he is talking about, so let's convert an implied statement of fact into a statement of belief".  If Chris or Eth had made a statement such as yours, it would carry a different weight, but a naive reader on this forum does not know what background you, I, Chris, or Eth might have.
« Last Edit: 11/03/2008 16:27:10 by another_someone »
 

Offline Make it Lady

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4050
  • Hands-on fun for everyone!
    • View Profile
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #8 on: 11/03/2008 16:20:44 »
Slow down and read what Cloudi wrote. He is a She as she talks about her Periods and some of the problems coinciding with them. If she seeks help a contraceptive that stops her periods may be all she needs. She may have a terrible hormone imbalance. WE DON'T KNOW so professional help IS required.
The autistic bit is more commonly found in men because it is due to an extremely masculine brain. Women can have it though. I'm very interested in the masculine and feminine brain. You can find out which type you have by measuring your ring and index fingers. Can't remember which one has to be bigger in order to mean you have a male brain or visa-versa.  
 

another_someone

  • Guest
So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #9 on: 11/03/2008 16:26:16 »
Slow down and read what Cloudi wrote. He is a She as she talks about her Periods and some of the problems coinciding with them. If she seeks help a contraceptive that stops her periods may be all she needs. She may have a terrible hormone imbalance. WE DON'T KNOW so professional help IS required.
The autistic bit is more commonly found in men because it is due to an extremely masculine brain. Women can have it though. I'm very interested in the masculine and feminine brain. You can find out which type you have by measuring your ring and index fingers. Can't remember which one has to be bigger in order to mean you have a male brain or visa-versa. 

Sorry, I did see that, but did not read it right.  I saw reference to monthly periods, but did not read that as menstrual periods (mea culpa).  You are totally correct that autistic traits are generally male and would be very much less likely in a woman, but I had got it into my mind that this was a man.

If I recall, a longer ring finger I believe is the indicator of higher prenatal testosterone levels, and the fingers of more equal length would indicate lower prenatal testosterone.

OK, I think my recall may have been in error:

http://www.unl.edu/rhames/courses/readings/homofinger/homo_finger.html
Quote
In women, the index finger (2D, second digit) is almost the same length as the fourth digit (4D), although it may be slightly longer or shorter; in men, the index finger is more often shorter than the fourth. The greater 2D:4D ratio in females is  established in two-year-olds1. Because all non-gonadal somatic sex differences in humans appearto be the result of fetal androgens that masculinize males3, the sex difference in the 2D:4D ratio probably reflects the prenatal influence of androgenon males4.

In an anonymous survey, 720 adults who were attending public street fairs in the San Francisco area were asked their gender, age, sexual orientation, handedness, and the number and gender of children their mother had carried before them. As expected, men have significantly longer fingers than women (P < 0.001), and we confirmed reports that the 2D:4D ratio is greater in women than it is in men.

This sex difference in 2D:4D is greater on the right hand than on the left (Fig. 1a), indicating that the right-hand 2D:4D is more sensitive to fetal androgens than the left-hand ratio. The right-hand 2D:4D ratio of homosexual women was significantly more masculine (that is, smaller) than that of heterosexual women, and did not differ significantly from that of heterosexual men. Thus finger ratios, like otoacoustic emissions5, suggest that at least some homosexual women were exposed to greater levels of fetal androgen than heterosexual women.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digit_ratio
Quote
2D:4D is sexually dimorphic: in men, the second digit tends to be shorter than the fourth, and in females the second tends to be the same size or slightly longer than the fourth. Some would prefer to say that this trait is 'sexually differentiated' rather than 'sexually dimorphic' in recognition of the fact that the effect size is fairly small (2D:4D distributions of the two sexes overlap to a great degree), especially as compared to other sexually dimorphic traits such as height.
« Last Edit: 11/03/2008 16:42:22 by another_someone »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

So, what do you think I have?
« Reply #9 on: 11/03/2008 16:26:16 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums