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Author Topic: What would happen if two electrons were forced to fuse together?  (Read 6784 times)

Offline science_guy

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Assuming infinite possible pressure and infinite electrons, what would happen if two electrons were forced to fuse together?

or is this fundamentally impossible?
« Last Edit: 25/04/2008 17:21:05 by chris »


 

Offline graham.d

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I don't think it is possible. You would be assuming that, by fusing, their was some very strong short range force that is able to overcome the electromagnetic repulsion so that whenthe pressure is released this bilectron is stable, even for a short period. I don't think this force has been postulated or has any theoretical basis.
 

Offline Supercryptid

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It might form a black hole.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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It might form a black hole.

Your reasoning being what?
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Electrons have been collided at the higest possible energies all you get out is a load of new particles in particle antiparticle pairs plus the electrons there is nothing to make the electrons stick together.
 

Offline Supercryptid

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It might form a black hole.

Your reasoning being what?
Just that highly compressed objects form black holes, in principle. I suppose that the electric repulsion might make such an object unstable, given that the electrical repulsion would far outdo the gravitational attraction.
 

Offline syhprum

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Electrons do in fact pair up in superconductors but not closely enough to form a new particle
 

another_someone

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Electrons do in fact pair up in superconductors but not closely enough to form a new particle

Electrons pair up even at ordinary temperatures in an atom - hence why some electron configurations are more stable than others.  On the other hand, in superconductors, as at room temperature, electrons still exist within the context of an atom (or at most, in a molecule), and so in an overall structure that remains electrically neutral.
 

Offline peterlowrie

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There's no way for combining electrons or even neutrons to form black holes. Black holes being a myth. The EM force is 39 orders of magnitude greater than the gravitational force - gravity simply isn't powerful enough to overcome it to form a black hole. This makes dark matter and dark energy mythological also. Science is about observation and empirical data, not speculation or beliefs, beliefs are the purview of religion - not science.

:-) Peter
 

Offline chiralSPO

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There is a minimum mass required to form a black hole, and two electrons (or even two neutrons) don't come close to it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_mass
 

Offline jccc

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if you cannot put 2 electrons together, how can anything able to separate 1 electron and 1 proton?

isn't science says electron has wave property, maybe 2 electrons able to become 2 in 1 waveelectron?

in theory if 2 electrons can be lock into 1 piece, it will become 2 tiny dots with 2 negative charges.
 

Offline jccc

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There's no way for combining electrons or even neutrons to form black holes. Black holes being a myth. The EM force is 39 orders of magnitude greater than the gravitational force - gravity simply isn't powerful enough to overcome it to form a black hole. This makes dark matter and dark energy mythological also. Science is about observation and empirical data, not speculation or beliefs, beliefs are the purview of religion - not science.

:-) Peter

you can say that again again again again!

who is going to listen? beside me.

electron emit photon? change energy level? graviton? orbital? standing wave?

my dear Lord!
 

Offline PmbPhy

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Quote from: science_guy
Assuming infinite possible pressure and infinite electrons, what would happen if two electrons were forced to fuse together?

or is this fundamentally impossible?
It's fundamentally impossible.
 

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