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Author Topic: E. coli food poisoning  (Read 8455 times)

Offline JimBob

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E. coli food poisoning
« on: 25/04/2008 02:09:48 »
REAL QUESTIONS BELOW

OK First-hand, recent exposure

Last Friday I ate a lunch at a restaurant in Dallas. By midnight, high velocity projectile fluids were coming out of both ends and by 8 AM Saturday morning I was in an ambulance on the way to the hospital. It seems I ingested an overly ambitious strain of E. coli. (cultured) SO - I was shivering, running a fever, couldn't get the blood to flow when the ambulance tech tried to ***** my finger for a sugar level test - had to do it twice in the same spot, second time with a larger lancet. He got a IV started and it stayed flowing for a several days. The first bag was a potassium solution, the second a Magnesium solution, the third a calcium solution - all are necessary for proper nerve function.

In the Emergency Room - Casualty unit ? in UK - I started convulsions and they gave me something in the IV.

I am on an rather strong antibiotic - and I will be  for a while until the beasties all die feel But tomorrow I will probably feel as normal as can be.

I am rehydrated, re-electrilted and taking pills containing  the intestinal flora I need to digest food every time I eat.

I have had dysentery before and this was so much worse.

NOW MY QUESTION

How does something we all have, E. coli mutate to such an extent it almost kills us? And what is the small difference that makes this happen? HOW can it happen?

How can it happen so fast?
« Last Edit: 26/04/2008 15:58:29 by JimBob »


 

Offline JimBob

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #1 on: 26/04/2008 15:59:09 »
Hey - there are questions here!
 

another_someone

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #2 on: 26/04/2008 16:13:52 »
I am not sure the E.Coli that almost kills you is the same strain as that which is normally in your stomach.

I suspect that once upon a time all e.coli was deadly, but then some e.coli switched off some of the more toxic genes, and realised that if its host lived longer, then the e.coli itself had a cushier life, since it didn't have to find a new home quite so soon.
 

Offline iko

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #3 on: 26/04/2008 17:57:30 »
Hi Jimbob,

1st question: what did you eat to get so heavily intoxicated?
You ate dangerous beasts with your food...there has
been no 'mutation' in your good intestinal bacteria.

wish you a quick recover...it takes guts!  ;D
As usual, it's a matter of good and bad guys:
E.coli, like any sort of bugs, come in different strains,
and make different toxins with various effects...because
we are all different!
A quick cut&paste for you:

The effect of probiotics and organic acids on Shiga-toxin 2 gene expression
in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.


Carey CM, Kostrzynska M, Ojha S, Thompson S.
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Center, 93 Stone Road West, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 5C9.

Probiotics are known to have an inhibitory effect against the growth of various foodborne pathogens, however, the specific role of probiotics in Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) virulence gene expression has not been well defined. Shiga toxins are members of a family of highly potent bacterial toxins and are the main virulence marker for STEC. Shiga toxins inhibit protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells and play a role in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC possesses Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), both of which have A and B subunits. Although STEC containing both Stx1 and Stx2 has been isolated from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, Stx2 is more frequently associated with human disease complications. Thus, the effect of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Bifidobacterium strains on stx2A expression levels in STEC was investigated. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were isolated from farm animals, dairy, and human sources and included L. rhamnosus GG, L. curvatus, L. plantarum, L. jensenii, L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. reuteri, P. acidilactici, P. cerevisiae, P. pentosaceus, B. thermophilum, B. boum, B. suis and B. animalis. E. coli O157:H7 (EDL 933) was coincubated with sub-lethal concentrations of each probiotic strain. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, relative stx2A mRNA levels were determined according to a comparative critical threshold (Ct) real-time PCR. Data were normalized to the endogenous control glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the level of stx2A expression between treated and untreated STEC was compared. Observed for all probiotic strains tested, stx2A was down-regulated, when compared to the control culture. Probiotic production of organic acids, as demonstrated by a decrease in pH, influenced stx2A gene expression.

Microbiol Methods. 2008 Feb 11 [Epub ahead of print]



You may have found too many bad guys in a row,
they managed to survive in the acid of your stomach,
not enough probiotics were ready in the intestine to counteract
production of enterotoxins...
More probably E.coli had already produced toxins and contaminated your food.
That would partially explain the abrupt onset of your symptoms.

So drink your yoghurt and go play outside!







Today, infection from deadly E.coli O157:H7 bacteria
and other foodborne microorganisms still represents
a major problem and cause of high mortality and
morbidity even in our safe 'developed' countries:


Edible Coatings May Boost Food Safety

By Rick Ansorge     HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) 2006.

A natural, edible coating could help keep deadly E. coli bacteria and other nasty bugs away from fresh produce, U.S. government scientists report.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture say the new compounds reduce the risk of infection from deadly E.coli O157:H7 bacteria and other foodborne microorganisms. They report their findings in the Nov. 29 issue of the Journal of Food and Agricultural Chemistry.

"We hope that these coatings will have wide commercial potential," said Tara McHugh, a food chemist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Service in Albany, Calif. Her team conducted lab tests on the E. coli-inhibiting ability of apple-puree food coatings containing one of three natural antimicrobial compounds: oregano, lemongrass and cinnamon oil.

The researchers say the oregano oil coating was the most effective, killing more than 50 percent of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria within three minutes.

Because such coatings contain sticky sugars and fats, they may adhere longer to fresh produce and provide a more concentrated, longer-lasting method for killing bacteria than conventional, water-based washes, McHugh said.

That would be welcome news to consumers who have been bombarded with reports this fall about food safety, starting with the E. coli O157:H7 scare in mid-September that killed three Americans and sickened nearly 200 others who ate tainted spinach.

Subsequent scares included a salmonella outbreak that sickened 171 people in 19 states, plus recalls of E. coli-tainted lettuce and ground beef. And on Monday, officials at the USDA announced that a type of salmonella typically found in eggs is turning up with increasing frequency in chicken meat.

But some scientists wonder if edible coatings with antimicrobial compounds will prove practical in improving food safety outside of the laboratory.

"They haven't yet been tested in the real world, which means they need to be tested on fresh fruits and vegetables. So we don't know how efficacious they would really be," said Dr. Pascal James Imperato, chairman of the department of preventive medicine and community health at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, and a former New York City health commissioner.

"When produce is shipped, it undergoes a great deal of handling and exposure to many different temperature environments," Imperato said. "For this to have commercial applications, it would have to undergo much more stringent scientific study."

Food allergy is another possible complication, Imperato said. "Suppose you have someone who's allergic to oregano? I would view this study as showing interesting preliminary scientific results that would have to be corroborated by other scientists before these coatings are adopted by the commercial fresh produce industry."

Because E. coli and other microorganisms can lurk anywhere on the surface -- or even the interior -- of fresh produce, it's possible that the coatings might not affect them all, said Arun Bhunia, professor of food microbiology at the Purdue University department of food science in West Lafayette, Ind.

"My concern is that only a small portion of the food would be in direct contact with the film," Bhunia said. "How can it be assured that the entire content of a package would be exposed to the antimicrobial agent and thus provide safety? How stable is this compound, and how long would it maintain its activity? It also appears that the researchers have not tested many strains of E. coli O157:H7 to assess overall efficacy."

for more reading click down here:

http://news.healingwell.com/index.php?p=news1&id=536211





 



« Last Edit: 26/04/2008 21:06:24 by iko »
 

Offline JimBob

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #4 on: 27/04/2008 00:30:44 »
The culprit was most likely unwashed spinach in the Crepes Florentine at a rather nice eatery.

They were magnificent but - oh - the pay-back!
 

paul.fr

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #5 on: 27/04/2008 00:52:07 »
stop looking for sympathy, it's all about you isn't it! Well what about me? All i want is a good woman, well , actually a bad one would be better!!!
 

Offline JimBob

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #6 on: 27/04/2008 04:15:31 »
Whine, Whine, Whine

A little sympathy would be appreciated but not necessary - I have already milked this for about as much as I am going to get - especially from you.

So I'll send you a fiver - it is about all you need for what you have in mind - or hand.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #7 on: 27/04/2008 09:38:55 »
JimBob

A litter of puppies can kill each other as they have different Ecoli bacteria. It is important to keep them clean so they don't infect each other. So the variations of ecoli are considerable, even a slight variation and the body defences can't recognise the invader quick enough to counter the attack. I suspec the massive changes going on in the body that can lead to death are related to the bdy mounting a huge assault on the invader, begining with ejecting it from the bowels and gut. Though not a specialist with these bugs, but do have first hand experience with losing a almost a full litter of puppies.

Lime juice drank ASAP kills Ecoli stone dead! 1 whole lime will do the trick juiced. repeated at least twice a day
 

Offline iko

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #8 on: 27/04/2008 12:56:25 »
JimBob

Lime juice drank ASAP kills Ecoli stone dead! 1 whole lime will do the trick juiced. repeated at least twice a day


Yes, there are several 'recipes' to sterilize drinks and foodstuff by natural juices...in minutes!


Effectiveness of lemon juice, vinegar and their mixture in the elimination of Salmonella typhimurium on carrots (Daucus carota L.).


Sengun IY, Karapinar M.
Food Engineering Department, Engineering Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir, Turkey.

Lemon juice, vinegar and the mixture of lemon juice and vinegar (1:1) were tested for their effectiveness in reducing the counts of inoculated Salmonella typhimurium (approximately 6 and 3 log cfu/g) on carrots. Treatment of carrot samples with lemon juice vinegar alone for different exposure times (0, 15, 30 and 60 min) caused significant reductions ranging between 0.79-3.95 and 1.57-3.58 log cfu/g, respectively, while the number of pathogens was reduced to an undetectable level after 30-min treatment by combined used lemon juice vinegar.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2004 Nov 15;96(3):301-5.




« Last Edit: 27/04/2008 12:59:36 by iko »
 

Offline JimBob

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #9 on: 27/04/2008 16:00:26 »
Thanks for the last bit of info - it is a very handy thing to know. Now - to get my strength back and my body to completely hold onto it's food is the next challenge. The pills containing live flora seem to help.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #10 on: 27/04/2008 17:20:26 »
"A litter of puppies can kill each other as they have different Ecoli bacteria."
Where did they get these bugs from? They weren't born with a different set of bacteria and litters generally stay together so they would pick up pretty much the same strains.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #11 on: 27/04/2008 21:21:45 »
Wish this was the case, but even the vet confirmed that E coli can be different in puppies from the same litter. Fading puppy syndrome was initially given, although we could not see the point in having an autopsi done on the puppies that died in order to confirm it was ecoli that did it.


Abstract
  Epidemiological analyses were performed in five breeding kennels with Escherichia coli infections in newborn pups using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Previous reports demonstrated the high discriminatory power of this method and its usefulness for detecting epidemiologically related isolates. A total of 113 E. coli strains were isolated from vagina, faeces, oral cavity, milk and organs from 19 adult dogs, and 57 diseased or dead pups from 12 litters. Restriction enzyme analyses were performed using XbaI and BlnI digests and the resulting 91 DNA patterns were aligned for comparison. The results showed that a total of 60% of E. coli strains from progeny were also found in vaginal samples of the mothers. Another bacterial source was the faeces found within the kennels. One instance of milk and oral cavity isolates of the mother was found to be identical with strains isolated from the pups. The results indicate that for repeated cases of E. coli infections in neonates, diagnostic procedures of vaginal and faecal swabs from dams result in isolation of the responsible bacteria with high probability and further suggest that preterm treatment could help to control bacterial diseases and losses in pups. In addition, the observation that two canine strains were found to be identical with an E. coli strain isolated from a human case of diarrhoea strongly supports the canine reservoir hypothesis.
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0093691X03004485
« Last Edit: 27/04/2008 21:28:44 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

Offline Carolyn

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #12 on: 28/04/2008 02:36:18 »
stop looking for sympathy, it's all about you isn't it! Well what about me? All i want is a good woman, well , actually a bad one would be better!!!
Whine, Whine, Whine

A little sympathy would be appreciated but not necessary - I have already milked this for about as much as I am going to get - especially from you.

So I'll send you a fiver - it is about all you need for what you have in mind - or hand.

JimBob & Paul - You both have my deepest sympathy.  Hope you make a speedy recovery JimBob and Paul...I'm hoping a really good bad woman comes your way soon.
 

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E. coli food poisoning
« Reply #12 on: 28/04/2008 02:36:18 »

 

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