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Author Topic: Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?  (Read 8876 times)

Paul Anderson

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Paul Anderson asked the Naked Scientists:

Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles? I carried a heavy bag last November thinking I was avoiding having to make two trips with it, and I think I damaged something in my neck from the weight of the strap on the side of my neck.

Regards

Paul
NZ
What do you think?

Andrew K Fletcher

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #1 on: 08/05/2008 08:03:48 »
Hi Paul mri scan will provide clearer immages. Ultrasound won't show much if anything. Cat scan for bone and Cartilage

Gentle traction might be helpful. Have check up first to see if there are any bone spurs that might be protruding into the soft tissue.

RD

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #2 on: 08/05/2008 12:08:46 »
Ultrasound may show the damage, but Andrew is correct: a MRI has higher resolution.

Ultrasound doesn't seem to be an effective therapy though ...
http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/ultranil.htm

rosalind dna

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #3 on: 08/05/2008 12:29:28 »
What about X-Rays then? I thought that they are used to show up
broken or strained muscles or bones.

RD

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #4 on: 08/05/2008 13:07:49 »
What about X-Rays then? I thought that they are used to show up
broken or strained muscles or bones.


Bones yes, muscles No...
Quote
traditional plain X-rays pose very little use in the imaging of soft tissues such as the brain or muscle.
 Imaging alternatives for soft tissues are computed axial tomography (CAT or CT scanning), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-ray

cindybasty07

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #5 on: 05/04/2010 03:17:32 »
My aunt was a doctor and I ask her about that and she told me that ultrasound is one of the most frequently prescribed treatments for one of the most common sport and athletic injuries. And there's really no good scientific evidence showing that it treats injured muscles effectively. Ultrasound therapy does nothing to help an injured skeletal muscle heal any faster.

Karen W.

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #6 on: 08/04/2010 09:40:22 »
I have never heard of using an ultrasound as a form of treatment, only, just as a tool to determine damage or find things like blood clots etc..but reading this article that RD gave us, Thanks RD! Here is his link below the Article...:

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/ultranil.htm   


It Looks like they have used as a therapy but the study shown suggests no benefit other then it feels better but no physical signs that it has healed any better then without it....

Here I printed the article here so you do not have to leave the site to read it.

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/ultranil.htm


"OSU News Research Archive
Search an archive of past research stories.
Coverage of OSU Research
Reports on national news coverage of university research.
Reporting on Cancer
A reporter's guide to the disease.
Science Communications Staff
Who we are and what we do.
 
 

(Last updated 4/12/04)

 

   
ULTRASOUND TREATMENT FOR HURT MUSCLES MAY FEEL GOOD, BUT DOESN’T PROMOTE HEALING, STUDY SUGGESTS

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ultrasound therapy does nothing to help an injured skeletal muscle heal any faster, according to a new study conducted in rats.

Although ultrasound is one of the most frequently prescribed treatments for one of the most common sport and athletic injuries – skeletal muscle contusions – there's really no good scientific evidence showing that it treats injured muscles effectively, said Steven Devor, the study's lead author and an assistant professor of sport and exercise sciences at Ohio State University.
"Because the injured muscle feels better after ultrasound treatment, an athlete may be tempted to get back in the game before the skeletal muscle injury is really healed. This puts him at risk for more significant re-injury if the muscle isn't completely healed."

Devor and his colleagues used ultrasound to treat contusion injuries inflicted on rats' gastrocnemius muscles – the main muscle in the calf.

Ultrasound treatment didn't hasten healing at all, even when compared to injured muscles that weren't treated with ultrasound.

"It didn't make one bit of difference in the time it took the treated and non-treated calf muscles to heal," Devor said. "Millions of people receive ultrasound treatment every year for muscle injuries, with insurance companies usually covering the cost."

Ultrasound treatments can cost around $50 per 15-minute session.

The study appears in a recent issue of the International Journal of Sports Medicine.

The researchers dropped small weights – about six ounces – onto the gastrocnemius muscles of rats' right and left hind limbs. The impact created a contusion in each muscle.

"The injury is similar to what might happen to a field hockey player if she was struck in the calf with a hockey stick," Devor said.

The researchers treated one hind limb on each rat with ultrasound daily for seven days for five minutes per session. Ultrasound waves were transmitted through a small wand that was rubbed along the rats' limbs. The other limb, used as the control, was left to recover on its own. Rats were sacrificed at various points during the two-month study so that the researchers could evaluate how each gastrocnemius muscle was healing.

The researchers compared a variety of markers in the muscle tissue from the ultrasound treated and non-treated legs of each rat, including muscle mass, protein concentration and muscle fiber cross-section. Cross-section simply refers to the amount of force a muscle can exert – the greater the cross-section a muscle possesses, the more force it can produce.

A comparison of these markers led the researchers to conclude that the muscles treated with ultrasound healed at the same rate as the muscles that were left to heal naturally.

While Devor doesn't discount that ultrasound treatment may feel good, he worries that treating a sports-related muscle injury with ultrasound may give an athlete a false sense of security.

"Because the injured muscle feels better after ultrasound treatment, an athlete may be tempted to get back in the game before the skeletal muscle injury is really healed," Devor said. "This puts him at risk for more significant re-injury if the muscle isn't completely healed.

"I'm supportive of the placebo effect – massaging an injury may make the person feel better," he continued. "But in this case, ultrasound treatment didn't have any physiological effect. Medical practitioners who administer this treatment regularly need to ask more questions about its effectiveness in treating injured skeletal muscle."

The results from this study may readily translate to human muscular injuries, as the structure of skeletal muscle tissue is the same across species.

"Our skeletal muscle tissue is the same as what's in a rat, dog, cat, etc.," Devor said. "The difference is that the tissue is exposed to diverse hormonal environments."

He and his colleagues are continuing to study ultrasound therapy – they're currently looking at the effect that different types of ultrasound have on skeletal muscle contusion injuries.

In the meantime, Devor's best advice is that injured athletes let muscles heal as Mother Nature intended – on their own time.

This study was supported by a seed grant from Ohio State.

Devor conducted this work with Ohio State colleagues Timothy Kirby, an associate professor of sport and exercise sciences; Mark Merrick, an assistant professor with the School of Allied Medical Professions; and Linda Wilkin, a graduate student.
« Last Edit: 04/10/2010 12:57:53 by BenV »

berna21yesha

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #7 on: 04/10/2010 10:58:58 »
My aunt was a doctor and I ask her about that and she told me that ultrasound is one of the most frequently prescribed treatments for one of the most common sport and athletic injuries. And there's really no good scientific evidence showing that it treats injured muscles effectively. Ultrasound therapy does nothing to help an injured skeletal muscle heal any faster.

I have read some article in the other site that ultrasound is safe than x-ray. There is also some benefits that ultrasound could help people. That ultrasound could be able to detect the possible ectopic pregnancy, evaluate the growth of the baby.
« Last Edit: 04/10/2010 11:03:04 by berna21yesha »

tommya300

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Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles?
« Reply #8 on: 05/10/2010 03:11:01 »
Paul Anderson asked the Naked Scientists:

Is ultrasound any good for showing damaged muscles? I carried a heavy bag last November thinking I was avoiding having to make two trips with it, and I think I damaged something in my neck from the weight of the strap on the side of my neck.

Regards

Paul
NZ
What do you think?

Damaged muscles would show up with a black and blue in the area on the surface of the skin.
Due to broken blood vessels. A pinched or damaged nerve may be another thing.
Strain from overworked muscle tissue, sling, rest it, favor that place with a vibrating message warm and cold compress to shock the muscle tissue and nerve. Knotted muscle tissue is annoying.
Take an aspirin call the Dr. in the morning.
Ultrasound for finding babies and hydoceles, if you have a hydrocele at your neck and shoulder level you do have a small problem, see a Dr. asap.  
« Last Edit: 05/10/2010 03:22:43 by tommya300 »

 

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