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Author Topic: Why Is Jasmine Tea Good For Digestion ?  (Read 15329 times)

Offline neilep

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Why Is Jasmine Tea Good For Digestion ?
« on: 14/05/2008 00:12:39 »
Dearest Wonderfun Peeps of Smoochy Klever Knowing Stuff,

See this cup of jasmine tea ?



Nice eh ?


Last night as I enjoyed a pot of Jasmine tea in my fave chinese restaurant.....I got talking to the chef and he said that Jasmine tea is good for the digestion.

Why's that then ?




 

Offline neilep

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Why Is Jasmine Tea Good For Digestion ?
« Reply #1 on: 16/05/2008 01:20:17 »
THANK EWE.....erhmmm......MYSELF !

I did my own search and this is what I found:

Jasmine Teas are Good For:

    * Digestion
    * Anti-bacterial
    * Longevity/anti-aging

1. Boosting Immunity

Polyphenols have been found to increase white blood cells, the "soldiers" which fight infection in the human body. Tea extract is one of the main ingredients in a medicine now widely used with a high rate of success in China to counteract the reduction in white blood cells which accompanies radiation therapy.

A study of Jasmine tea by the Fujian Institute of Traditional Medicine and Pharmacology found that tea heightened certain functions of the white blood cells in mice. Soviet researchers say that tea helps the body excrete harmful radioactive strontium 90 before it settles in the bones. Chinese sources say tea can help absorb strontium 90 even after it has lodged in the bones.
2. Helps prevent heart disease

Research indicates that tea may work against heart attacks, strokes and thrombosis. Tea contributes to this in several ways. Firstly it does this in a general way through its role as a gentle stimulant to the heart and circulatory system. Secondly, it strengthens and keeps the blood vessel walls soft. Thirdly, there is evidence that the phenols in tea inhibit the absorption of cholesterol in the digestive tract, which could help decrease the cholesterol in the bloodstream. Fourthly, it may decrease the blood's tendency to form thrombi, or unwanted clots. Often several of these functions operate together against a stoke or heart attack. Strokes and thrombosis often occur because the blood vessels have lost their elasticity. Rutin has long been prescribed to keep these walls soft.
3. Fights tooth decay

Tea has turned out to be a double-barrelled threat to tooth decay for both the polyphenols (tannin) and the fluoride it contains. Polyphenols tend to reduce the formation of plaque, while fluoride strengthens tooth enamel so that it can resist decay.
4. Tea against cancer

Considerable research is being carried out on the role of tea drinking in preventing cancer. Out of 25 papers related to health presented at the Hangzhou Symposium, seven reported on research on cancer and tumors. Green tea seems to get the best results, with Lung Ching preferred. Stomach cancer, the number one cause of death in Japan, is at its lowest rate in Shizuoka prefecture along the coast southwest of Tokyo. One explanation is that Shizuoka is a tea-growing district and its inhabitants drink large amounts of green tea.

Tea has some effect against cancer because it inhibits the formation or action of cancer-causing substances. Tea may block the action of nitrosamines which can cause cancer, said Dr. Han Chi, and associate professor at the Institute of Nutrition and Food Hygiene under the Chinese Academy of Preventative Medicine. In a test of 145 types of tea, she and her colleagues rated green tea highest, with a blocking rate of 90 percent. Brick, Jasmine, oolong, and black tea followed in that order.

Another way tea may help fight cancer is through preventing cell mutation. The antioxidation actions of the polyphenols in green tea inhibit mutation of the DNA in healthy cells, which can cause them to become cancer cells.
5. Longevity and Ageing

Long ago in China, tea was an ingredient in immortality potions favored by the Taoists, who were keen on that subject. Still today, perhaps as an echo of those beliefs, claims are made that tea drinking helps one to live to a ripe old age. While it is no magic fountain of youth, some of its benefits can be said to contribute to longevity (stimulation of bodily functions, strengthening the immune system, reducing the chance of heart disease and improving stomach functions). The fluoride in tea can strengthen bones and help ward off osteoporosis in the same way that is strengthens dental enamel.


http://www.innteas.com/teas/jasmine.htm

Thank ewe ME !

 

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Why Is Jasmine Tea Good For Digestion ?
« Reply #1 on: 16/05/2008 01:20:17 »

 

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