The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Discuss: Life on Mars  (Read 5799 times)

Offline thedoc

  • Forum Admin
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 511
  • Thanked: 12 times
    • View Profile
Discuss: Life on Mars
« on: 11/10/2010 13:01:50 »
Hours before NASA's phoenix mission was due to land on Mars, the Naked Scientists took our own tour of the Martian landscape.  We discuss how looking in valleys could tell us what shaped the Martian surface, and how probing Martian mud could reveal signs of life past and present.  Also, we find out how scientists have watched the explosive death of a star, and how an asteroid collision millions of miles away could have seen the birth of the meteorite that killed off the dinosaurs.  Plus, in Kitchen Science, we show you how to make weightless water!
Listen to this Show

or  

If you want to discuss this show, or ask a question, this is the place to do it.
« Last Edit: 11/10/2010 13:01:50 by _system »


 

flynn morgan age 5

  • Guest
Re: Life on Mars
« Reply #1 on: 25/05/2008 18:24:33 »
has there ever been dinosaur bones found in britain
 

Offline B. Elliott

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Life on Mars
« Reply #2 on: 26/05/2008 21:06:26 »
I have a couple of questions for anyone who may know the answer. These questions mostly pertain to the lander it's self.

-When the batteries are fully drained due to lack of sunlight and the heaters then subsequently fail, what equipment will potentially be damaged? ie; the Batteries?

-Once the batteries are completely drained, would it be possible for them to be recharged?

-When the sunlight returns again, could the solar panels recharge the batteries, or is a slight power source required for the charging process? Could the panels even put out this kind of power?

Brett,
 

Offline turnipsock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 586
  • Beekeeper to the unsuspecting
    • View Profile
Life on Mars
« Reply #3 on: 26/05/2008 22:08:19 »
The Mars Rover missions shut down when the batteries are low. This happened during a dust storm at some point. Once the batteries have recharged, the Rover restarts.
 

Offline B. Elliott

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Life on Mars
« Reply #4 on: 27/05/2008 00:03:08 »
I was talking about the non-roving Phoenix. In approximately 100days Mars will be entering it's Winter phase and that specific hemisphere of Mars will receive no sunlight whatsoever for a few months total. The lander will also become buried in a few feet of ice a this time.

To better clarity my question, will the batteries be able to survive being completely drained for so long and, will they be able to survive the extreme cold?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Life on Mars
« Reply #4 on: 27/05/2008 00:03:08 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums