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Author Topic: Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?  (Read 10930 times)

Offline skeptic

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    I recently read that Acetone can be added to gasoline (at a rate of 1-3 ounces/10 gallons) to decrease hydrocarbon emissions and improve mileage. 
    Does anyone know of someone who actually tried this?
« Last Edit: 03/06/2008 12:07:36 by chris »


 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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Re: Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #1 on: 03/06/2008 08:27:50 »
I've been meaning to but haven't got around to it yet. The theory is that it decreases the surface tension of the fuel, resulting in much smaller droplets when they are injected into the engine, so the fuel will have a larger surface area exposed to oxygen so it burns better.
 

Offline lightarrow

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #2 on: 03/06/2008 15:14:22 »
I've been meaning to but haven't got around to it yet. The theory is that it decreases the surface tension of the fuel, resulting in much smaller droplets when they are injected into the engine, so the fuel will have a larger surface area exposed to oxygen so it burns better.
...and this is more important for Diesel engines than for gasoline ones. They say to use around 1% acetone on Diesel fuel. Greater amounts (more than around 2-3%) can cause damages on the injectors.

Edit Sorry, it was 0.1%, not 1%.
« Last Edit: 12/06/2008 14:37:05 by lightarrow »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #3 on: 03/06/2008 19:21:20 »
OK, imagine I'm a diesel fuel supplier. I can put a coupple of percent of acetone in the fuel easilly and cheaply enough. Then I can sell my "premium" diesel- "with X% more miles to the gallon" at a premium price.

So can all the other diesel dealers.
Why aren't they doing it?
Is there any real evidence of any significat effect?

(And some bloke on a website saying "I did it and it works" doesn't count as evidence. I'm talking peer-reviewed double-blind testing here)
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #4 on: 04/06/2008 10:38:40 »
Its obviously a conspiracy, they don't add the acetone so that you have to buy more fuel! :P

Its possible that the added acetone could damage some engines in the same way that some cars can't take ethanol mixed fuel, because it dissolves the fuel valves or something.

For what its worth though, I heard from "some guy on the internet" that its much less than 1 percent;
http://www.pureenergysystems.com/news/2005/03/17/6900069_Acetone/
http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Acetone_as_a_Fuel_Additive

Apparently it was on mythbusters years ago though and they busted it? haven't seen the episode, but if you put too much acetone in your fuel it will decrease efficiency, "the people on the internet" reckon its about finding the right balance for your car.
« Last Edit: 04/06/2008 10:55:53 by Madidus_Scientia »
 

Offline skeptic

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #5 on: 04/06/2008 21:22:45 »
   I agree, they wouldn't intentionally add anything that would sell less fuel. It would be self-defeating. Even the idea of selling it at a premium wouldn't help, because it would scare away price-shoppers.

   You are also correct about the ratio. The peswiki and pureenergy sites, and several others(GOOGLE: Acetone as Fuel Additive, for a list) that recommend no more than 3 OZ/10GAL. They also list some possible side effects, but mostly from people who seem to be afraid to test it out. Things like: "I work with plastics, and I know acetone will eat plastic and rubber, and cars have plastic and rubber parts". I wonder if they know it comes in plastic bottles?

   I'm not so sure Myth Busters is completely unbiased. I would love to find a race-car mechanic or automotive engineer who doesn't have a program to sponsor. Someone who would benefit from a better fuel, and likes to try new things.   
« Last Edit: 04/06/2008 22:06:45 by skeptic »
 

Offline lightarrow

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #6 on: 11/06/2008 13:31:42 »
OK, imagine I'm a diesel fuel supplier. I can put a coupple of percent of acetone in the fuel easilly and cheaply enough. Then I can sell my "premium" diesel- "with X% more miles to the gallon" at a premium price.

So can all the other diesel dealers.
Why aren't they doing it?
I don't know, is it allowed?
Quote
Is there any real evidence of any significat effect?
Sincerely I only related to what they say in motors' forums.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #7 on: 11/06/2008 19:49:02 »
"I don't know, is it allowed?"
There are plenty of aditives in diesel. I doubt any of them make it cheaper so the idea that price would scare people off a premium product is weird.
 

Offline skeptic

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
« Reply #8 on: 11/06/2008 21:28:40 »
There are plenty of aditives in diesel. I doubt any of them make it cheaper so the idea that price would scare people off a premium product is weird.

What I meant was, if one supplier claimed to have a "magic" ingredient that made their diesel fuel superior to the others and raised their price above the market averages, they could lose more in terms of regular customers before it proved out, one way or the other. For them, it would work best as a cooperative effort.


Its possible that the added acetone could damage some engines in the same way that some cars can't take ethanol mixed fuel, because it dissolves the fuel valves or something.

http://www.pureenergysystems.com/news/2005/03/17/6900069_Acetone/ [nofollow]


The site above has been collecting data from specific trials, listed by Make/Model, supplied by people who have tried this already. It has been tried by many with GOOD results. 
« Last Edit: 12/06/2008 20:50:19 by skeptic »
 

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Can acetone be used as fuel additive to reduce emissions?
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