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Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« on: 16/06/2008 00:17:38 »


Dear All,

It has been a while since the last time I posted regarding how our family was attacked by flesh eating MRSA.
Thankfully we survived this life threatening attack. We accomplished this without medical care. We actually ran from antibiotics and this was the key to our survival.
This may not make sense to some of you, however when you really think of how to deal with resistant bacteria successfully, it does not make sense to through fuel to the fire with using antibiotics to defeat bacteria esp. resistant bacteria.
Shortly after Penicillin was discovered bacteria became resistant and now we find ourselves in the vicious cycle of throwing more and more drugs at bacteria. http://www.fda.gov/Fdac/features/795_antibio.html [nofollow]

The attack on my family and understanding that bacteria is mutating too rapidly for available drugs, force us to find something to save us. We had to find something that wouldn't cause bacteria to mutate and something that was strong enough to combat resistant bacteria.
Through many hours of research and prayer we did find something and we were able to deal with flesh eating CA-MRSA ourselves without the need for medical care.
We are here to share our story and research files and we hope this is helpful for you.

OUR FAMILY'S RECOVERY FROM A LIFE THREATENING ATTACK OF MRSA

Hello everyone,

Our family was viciously attacked by flesh eating MRSA.
We all have been free from any signs of CA-MRSA for over 2 yrs. and we accomplished this without antibiotics.
The day that MRSA attacked our family was the day that our lives changed forever.
We are fine physically now, however we still deal with the emotional damage that the attack of MRSA brought to our lives.

Instead of having a victim mentality and come under the emotional damage, we have decided to reach out and help others as much as possible. We are very proactive in trying to reach as many as possible.

My oldest son came home one day with a boil that looked like a bad spider bite and it slowly healed. A week later 6 more boils came back and they were literally eating away at his legs within a few hours. MRSA rapidly spread in our family going from one person to another regardless of how much we cleaned and disinfected everything.
My two sons were viciously attacked by flesh eating boils. I had a more mild attack. The boils that were on my sons were the size of small grapefruits.

We took him to our family doctor of 20 yrs plus, and his nurse practitioner threw Septra, Doxycycline, and Murpirocin ointment at the infection.
Our doctor called us and told us not to worry. He said that they have never had the antibiotics fail to kill MRSA and that it would not come back.

Well, it did come back within 10 days after using the drugs correctly.
The drugs did cause the infection to retreat which was a part of what save his life, because it bought us time to research.
We also consulted with an Infectious Disease Doctor and he confirmed my thinking, the doctors are experimenting to see which antibiotics might kill MRSA.
At that point I lost confidence in doctors and antibiotics and decided to research and pray.

Our lives depended on finding something that would cause MRSA to go away.
We did find something and it was pure, concentrated and stable Allicin called Allimed.
We used it as suggested and got the results we needed.
Since we used Allimed we have not had any signs or symptoms of MRSA for over 2 yrs.
My youngest son who also had flesh eating boils, did not need any antibiotics or medical care. I dealt with his boils myself.
We did keep in close contact with our doctors through our recovery process.

Because of our recovery we are now helping others nationwide with Allimed, stable Allicin.
We equip them to combat MRSA as our family did and win the battle.
We believe this is our mission now since we have had such a full recovery from MRSA.
Our recovery has made us very passionate about helping others.

Here are the scientific research files that I have collected to share with others regarding Allimed, physician's strength stable Allicin.

These are good files to print out to run by your doctor:

SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACT

http://www.allimed.us/pdf/article/Cutler%5B6%5D.pdf [nofollow]
http://www.allimed.us/pdf/article/April2005%5B9%5D.pdf [nofollow]

These files are good for you to review for point of reference:

http://allimed.us/pdf/article/Monograph%5B1%5D.pdf [nofollow]

http://www.allimed.us/pdf/article/report-5-2004%5B8%5D.pdf [nofollow]

http://www.allimed.us/pdf/article/Allicin_new.pdf [nofollow]

http://www.allimed.us/pdf/article/AllicinPPT%5B10%5D.pdf [nofollow]

http://www.allicinfacts.com/index.html [nofollow]

This link helps to confirm and validate Allimed information:

EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/eccmid15/abstract.asp?id=37436 [nofollow]

Research article, Dr. Ronald Cutler, Allicin, MRSA:

NATIONAL CENTER FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY INFORMATION
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15250668?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum [nofollow]


Research article, Allicin diminishes Bio-film (resistant coating around bacteria):

NATIONAL CENTER FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY INFORMATION
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12969283?ordinalpos=16&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum [nofollow]

Radio Interview with Dr. Ronald Cutler regarding Allicin and MRSA:

http://www.nutrimedical.com/audio_file.jhtml?id=190&file=0314071.mp3 [nofollow]

Video Interview with Biochemist, developer of Allisure (stable Allicin) Peter Josling, author of Allicin, The Heart of Garlic:

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=peter%20josling&search_category=22 [nofollow]

Internet News Articles, Dr. Culter, Allicin, MRSA:

250 people recover from MRSA using stable Allicin:
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/woman/health/article1279834.ece [nofollow]
 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3344325.stm [nofollow]
http://www.rapidmicrobiology.com/news/0401040.php [nofollow]

Allimed info and directions:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/25704.php [nofollow]
These are basic instructions for Allimed use. There are different protocols developed for the individual needs.

We work closely with the scientists and doctors who were successful at stablizing Allicin.
This enables us to provide accurate information to others we help regarding the proper use of Allimed to combat super bacteria and other serious health threats.
These doctors and scientists are very caring people who want to see many recover as our family did.

We hope that our recovery, efforts to provide scientific research, and our efforts to reach out to as many as possible is a blessing to you.

God bless and love to all!
Cathy (PHDee)
Cathy@optimalhealthusa.com
We welcome emails from those who want our help.
We will not answer derogatory comments.



« Last Edit: 21/06/2008 16:11:53 by PHDee »


 

Offline grumpy old mare

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #1 on: 18/06/2008 09:39:18 »
Could you please clarify what you mean with "flesh eating MRSA"  ? What is "CA-MRSA"?

And what do you mean by "we were attacked"? I thought MRSA is carried normally by quite a few humans and animals and "only" (like other bacteria and viruses) attacks when the immune system is compromised?
How come all of you had "spider bites"??


 

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Offline BenV

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #2 on: 18/06/2008 10:01:56 »
Shrunk
Dear Cathy,

Please don't duplicate content across different threads on the forum.  It helps us to keep all discussion within one thread, so I've deleted the other copies of this post to keep things tidy.
 

Offline chris

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #3 on: 18/06/2008 12:37:59 »
CA is "community acquired", as distinct from HA - hospital acquired - MRSA

Chris
 

Offline iko

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #4 on: 18/06/2008 17:09:36 »
Could anybody rename properly this interesting thread?
 

Offline PHDee

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #5 on: 18/06/2008 18:03:40 »
Dear Iko,

I could rename it. What would you like to call it?
Thanks so much for your kindness when I popped in a while back and posted about my family.
Everyone here was so kind and supportive and it meant a lot to me.
Take care, Cathy
 

Offline grumpy old mare

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #6 on: 19/06/2008 11:08:37 »
Thanks, Chris!
 

Offline PHDee

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #7 on: 19/06/2008 17:05:48 »
Dear Mare,

Unfortunately CA-MRSA is everywhere and as Chris mentioned it is community acquired.
This links explains more:
CA-MRSA is more deadly than HA-MRSA:
http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Non_hospital_MRSA_More_Deadly_999.html [nofollow]
We did not have a spider bite, however CA-MRSA looks like a very bad spider bite.
Many times it has been diagnosed improperly by doctors as a spider bite such as a brown recluse.
This is what CA-MRSA looks like (warning pictures are graphic):
http://content.edgar-online.com/edgar_conv_img/2006/10/10/0001104659-06-065672_G210012MOI006.JPG [nofollow]
http://images.google.com/images?um=1&hl=en&q=MRSA+boils [nofollow]

CA-MRSA is so aggressive and virulent that it does not need a compromised immune system. It is affecting the young and healthy as reported here:
http://www.rd.com/living-healthy/methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus/article42718-2.html [nofollow]

MRSA deaths may surpass AIDS:
http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/conditions/10/16/mrsa.cdc.ap/index.html [nofollow]

CA-MRSA often fatal:
http://www.reuters.com/article/healthNews/idUSKIM96900420080219 [nofollow]


This is not fun news, however it is better to know what is really going on in our world then to be attacked by this super bacteria and not know anything about it.
This is what happened to our family and I don't want it to happen to anyone else.
Not knowing what MRSA is nearly wipped out my family. The infection my oldest son had got to a life threatening point within 72 hrs. and I have also read that it can kill within 24 hrs. (Read RD report above)
When we saw several antibiotics fail to help us, we saw the bigger picture of what was really going on and decided to run from antibiotics as much as possible.
We had to find something that will not cause bacteria to mutate.
When we use antibiotics, we are throwing fuel to the fire.
The good news is that our family was able to deal with MRSA without further medical care. We are now doing great with no recurrences in more than 2 yrs.
As you can see by our experience and the scientific research files, MRSA can be overcome. I don't believe that antibiotics will help us anymore.
I try to tell everyone I know since the media is not covering it very well at all.
I hope this helps.
Cathy
« Last Edit: 19/06/2008 17:45:39 by PHDee »
 

Offline iko

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #8 on: 19/06/2008 18:04:00 »
Dear Iko,

I could rename it. What would you like to call it?
Thanks so much for your kindness when I popped in a while back and posted about my family.
Everyone here was so kind and supportive and it meant a lot to me.
Take care, Cathy

Sorry Cathy, I must apologize, because I was acting like Mr. Fussy:
you should type "Bacteria" to make random viewers more interested.
As we discussed a few months ago in the Garlic Miracle thread,
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=7257.0
scientists in UK are testing allycin antibiotic properties.
So something is 'moving'...and this is great, considering
how doctors are conservative and skeptical about natural remedies.
Thanks for the interesting links!

ikoD
« Last Edit: 21/06/2008 17:55:26 by iko »
 

Offline PHDee

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #9 on: 19/06/2008 21:43:54 »
Dear Iko,
Thanks for helping me with my blind spots. Feel free to point out anything else.
Not a problem at all.
Cathy
 

Offline grumpy old mare

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Re: The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #10 on: 21/06/2008 09:16:50 »
Thank you, Cathy, now I start getting it! ("blonde, stupid and secretary"!!)  The "spider bites" totally confused me!
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #11 on: 21/06/2008 16:19:48 »
Hi Mare,
Thank you for pointing out that my post needed clarification.
I changed it somewhat because I realized that it needed improvement.
Iko is helping me with my spelling too. By the time we all work on my post it will be in good shape.

BTW, I'm blonde (somewhat naturally), 50 yrs old, very chubby (not fat yet) and a bit fiesty at times (when provoked)
Please don't tell anyone.

Thanks again, Cathy
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #12 on: 21/06/2008 17:46:37 »
Hi Cathy, thanks for the post. You might be interested in this bit of research also.

Andrew K Fletcher
Hero Member

Posts: 1250
United Kingdom
KIS Keep It Simple
 
     

MessageID: 168229
16/04/2008 13:48:43        

   Antibacterial Activity of Citrus Fruit Juices Against Vibrio Species


Hiroyuki TOMOTAKE1), Tetsuro KOGA2), Masayuki YAMATO2), Afework KASSU2) and Fusao OTA2)

1) Iida Women's Junior College2) Division of Preventive Environment and Nutrition, Department of Nutritional Science, Graduate School of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima

(Received July 25, 2005)

Summary  Lemon, lime and sudachi juices were tested for antibacterial activity against seven strains of Vibrio species. All juices were effective in inhibiting the growth of the Vibrio strains. Citric acid, the major organic acid in these juices, was found to be responsible for inhibiting the growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Sauce prepared from sudachi juice showed a strong bactericidal activity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus, whereas the sauce adjusted to higher pH values had no bacterial activity. Diluted sudachi juice or citric acid solution also had antibacterial activity independently. These results suggest that citrus fruit juices are effective in preventing infection with Vibrio species.

Key Words:  citrus, juices, citric acid, Vibrio species


http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jnsv/52/2/52_157/_article

1Department of Microbiology, Abia State University, PMB 2000 Uturu, Nigeria
2Department of Botany, Abia state University,PMB 2000 Uturu, Nigeria.
*Corresponding author. E-Mail: osychin@yahoo.com.
Accepted 15 August, 2004
Code Number: jb04110
ABSTRACT
The antimicrobial effect in vitro of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Linn.) juice were assayed against Staphylococcus aureus; Bacillus spp., Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. All the test organisms were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of garlic and ginger singly did not inhibit any of the test organisms. The highest inhibition zone of 19 mm was observed with a combination of extracts on Staphylococcus aureus. Salmonella spp were resistant to almost all the extracts except lime.
Key words: Antimicrobial, ginger, garlic, lime, concoctions.
http://www.bioline.org.br/request?jb04110
 

Offline grumpy old mare

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #13 on: 22/06/2008 09:35:45 »
I won't tell anyone, Cathy!!  (and I hope you'll keep stumm about my lack of brain cells...)  [:X]

I've just been informed that my aunt has HA-MRSA...   :o
 

Offline Bored chemist

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #14 on: 22/06/2008 11:18:54 »
Just a thought; isn't the answer to the question "how do we survive in an era of resistant bacteria?"
The same way we always have done.
There have always been resistant bacteria and there are still people around who lived before there were any antibiotics.
For many people on this plannet the access to drugs is so limited that the drugs might as well not exist; from their point of view resistance to antibiotics is completely irrelevent.
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #15 on: 22/06/2008 16:29:58 »
Dear Mare,

Oh dear sorry to hear about your aunt.
I hope that she has good doctors. Some doctors are very on top of what to do to control MRSA and others are not.
Is she in the hospital now? I hope she is better soon.
Many people who don't respond to antibiotics have good results when they work with their immune system.
I don't know if you read this from my original post. It is very encouraging.
Stable Allicin diminishes the biofilm around the bacteria so it would work synergistically with antibiotics.
250 people recover from MRSA using stable Allicin:
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/woman/health/article1279834.ece [nofollow]
 
Let us know how she is doing,
Take care, Cathy
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #16 on: 22/06/2008 17:04:40 »
Dear Chemist,

This is my thinking and please let me know yours.

Typical staph is not as aggressive and virulent as a resistant one such as MRSA.
I don't think that staph was killing so many before it became resistant.
This is something new or new behavior that has been created by our overuse of antibiotics.
As we know bacteria always will adapt and organize, but I believe that it was not resistant until antibiotics or other drugs were used that cause the bacteria to develop biofilms.

With resistant infections we also now have co-infections (friends that come along) that cause more damage, giving the bacteria more of an advantage.
MRSA has a toxin called PVL and who knows what else it will bring along overtime.
I tend to think that we did not have super bacteria or resistant bacteria until we overused antibiotics. If this were not true then why are we needing to throw stronger and stronger drugs at it for longer periods of time?

The beauty of using stable Allicin (from garlic) is that at least for now, bacteria has not become resistant towards it. This has been the case for centuries with garlic. The difference with stable Allicin is that it is the antibiotic property of garlic and thus far has not been stabilized until now.
I am so glad that I found this information. I am convinced that my whole family would not be here if we didn't have stable Allicin.

It is ironic that we have something so effective against resistant bacteria that is saving many lives, and doesn't cause resistance, yet it is not available through our medical system.
This information should be shouted from the housetops. It is about survival and not money.
If we are smart then we as individuals will change our ways and not wait for the medical world to lead us.

After we learned about stable Allicin, we decided to run from antibiotics. The term antibiotic resistant bacteria kept churning in my brain and being a very common sense type blonde, this helped us to change our direction.
Chemist what are your thoughts on this?
Thanks, Cathy
« Last Edit: 22/06/2008 17:45:51 by PHDee »
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #17 on: 22/06/2008 17:30:15 »
Dear Andrew,

Thanks for the info. I will look into it. How did you know that I am addicted to research? It could be worse, right?
Cathy
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #18 on: 22/06/2008 19:42:46 »
HI Cathy.

MRSA has touched our family and friends and some of them are now dead because of it. You have done well to protect your own family and not let the powers that be, take control of your level of care for them.

I understand your greed for research and can say that I too have been compelled to research after the medical profession failed to help my Dad with even basic cleaning around his hospital bed. Urine from the previous patient was there for several days before I asked the staff for a mop to clean it up myself. Only then did they become embarrassed enough to clean under his bed.

MRSA and many other super-bugs are a result of an inherent lack of basic hygiene due to subcontractors skimping on cleaning duties.

Not long ago each ward had a matron that was revered and obeyed by all who walked her ward. Now we have too many high paid useless managers and overworked and underpaid doctors and nurses and no one really knows who has to do what and when.

Our UK Hospitals are a breeding ground for highly contagious pathogens and should be avoided unless no other option is available to us.
   
 

Offline Bored chemist

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #19 on: 22/06/2008 20:03:36 »
Generally bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics are less fit than those which are not. The reason is that they have to make whatever it is that blocks the antibiotic whereas their non-resistant counterparts don't need to.
It's also not a good idea from an evolutionary point of view for a acterium to become too virulent. If it kills its host before the host has a chance to spread it then it dies with the host.
There's another problem SA, or even MRSA is not one single strain, it is a general term that covers many varieties. The PVL toxin isn't produced by the MRSA itself, but by a virus that infects the bacterium.
There's one more thing to remember- MRSA may not be resistant to allicin, but it will be.

I think that Andrew has identified at least the major part of the problem whne he says
"MRSA and many other super-bugs are a result of an inherent lack of basic hygiene due to subcontractors skimping on cleaning duties.

Not long ago each ward had a matron that was revered and obeyed by all who walked her ward. Now we have too many high paid useless managers and overworked and underpaid doctors and nurses and no one really knows who has to do what and when."

The antibiotics made people forget just how nasty infections could be. Streptococal infections regularly killed a quarter of mothers in childbirth in some hospitals (the lucy ones didn't go to hospitals).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerperal_fever
Once infections beacme easy to treat there was less emphasis on avoiding them (and we are talking about wahsing hands here, not something complicated).
Also antibiotics were overprescribed- partly because it was easier (and cheaper) for a doctor to give a patient a prescription for penicillin than to take the time to explain that their cold or sore throat was probably due to a virus on which the antibiotic wouldn't have any effect.
 

Offline grumpy old mare

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #20 on: 23/06/2008 17:24:03 »
Quote
Once infections beacme easy to treat there was less emphasis on avoiding them (and we are talking about wahsing hands here, not something complicated).

It's not quite as easy as just blaming NHS staff (and contracted cleaners). It's also got a lot to do with the fact that now one can go to visit in-patients nearly all day long. "In the olden" (not always golden) days there were very restricted visiting times (1 or 2 hours per day), which made cleaning after 'the general public' was around much easier and therefore also kept all the various illnesses they brought along at bay.

And I'll never for the life of me understand why here in the UK they STILL build hospitals with rooms/wards for more than 4 people. It really beggars believe!
I was absolutely horrified when I moved here 11 years ago to find open wards for 15 people and more! I had never seen anything like it.
It just doesn't matter how clean the wards may be - things like C dif just spread like wildfire to all patients in such wards. Patients don't wash their hands every 5 minutes, nor do they tend to use a mask when sneezing or coughing.
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #21 on: 28/06/2008 17:25:11 »
Dear Andrew,

So Sorry that you have lost friends and loved ones and I know that it was probably very difficult to see your dad so neglected. I would have been furious!

I have a difficult time keeping my sanity (whats left) regarding this era that
we are now in. I still have brief moments of sanity through putting my efforts towards research and helping others.
It was amazing that we found stable Allicin when we did and I look at my family and realize how we all could have lost all of our lives.

This should be shouted from the housetops, but since it is not a drug there isn't the big bucks in it.
It is beyond understanding why this article is stuck in this small link and not on worldwide TV news stations:

250 people recover from MRSA using stable Allicin:
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/woman/health/article1279834.ece [nofollow]

There will be many loss of lives and limbs because of mankind's greed.
I hope to continue to shout it as loud as possible. It is about survival for all of us and the generations to come.

God bless, Cathy
« Last Edit: 28/06/2008 21:36:21 by PHDee »
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #22 on: 05/07/2008 16:32:50 »
Dear Bored Chemist,

I hope you are wrong (nothing personal).
Your comment:
"There's one more thing to remember- MRSA may not be resistant to allicin, but it will be. "

When you get a chance would you please give me your opinion after listening to this:
Radio Interview with Dr. Ronald Cutler regarding Allicin and MRSA:

http://www.nutrimedical.com/audio_file.jhtml?id=190&file=0314071.mp3 [nofollow]


Thank you, Cathy
 

Offline Bored chemist

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« Reply #23 on: 06/07/2008 13:56:23 »
That's roughly an hour long podcast; does it say anything that contradicts this?

Alicin is present in garlic. Garlic is susceptible to bacterial degradation (it goes off if it's left lying around). The microorganisms responsible for the degradation of garlic must be resistant to ailicin.
There are mechanisms for transfering resistance from one organism to another. Sooner or later these will transfer alicin resistance to mrsa if there's any evolutionary pressure to do so.
 

Offline PHDee

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #24 on: 07/07/2008 18:23:40 »
Dear BC,

That is the beauty of stable allicin. It is different than the unstable allicin in crushed garlic.

I have spoken with Dr. Ronald Cutler,PHD (who lead the developing team that stablized allicin), Peter Josling (biochemist) and
Norman Bennett (biochemist) regarding MRSA becoming resistant to stable allicin.
Their answer was that in 9 years of research there has been no resistance developed.
I found the radio broadcast very informative and thought you might have some input.
Thank you, Cathy
 

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The Era of Resistant Bacteria: How to survive
« Reply #24 on: 07/07/2008 18:23:40 »

 

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