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Author Topic: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?  (Read 16007 times)

Offline Carolyn

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Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« on: 19/06/2008 04:07:37 »
About a year ago I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  So far I've been able to manage the pain and have not let it stop my normal activities.  I see a chiropractor once a month, which seems to help.  I also take Vicodin, but only when the pain is extremely severe and only when it keeps me up for a few nights in a row..  Because it is an opiate....and because I like it sooo much...... I'm very careful about taking it.

Lately though, it doesn't seem to be working as well. I have even increased the dosage, but that doesn't help either.  My body seems to be developing a tolerance to it.  It's no longer getting rid of the pain or giving me that peaceful, relaxed, I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love.

This last week, the pain has been unbearable, to the point that I couldn't function.  I could barely get out of bed.  Easily the worst pain I've ever had with this condition.  Fortunately yesterday and today were a little better.

A friend recommended an OTC cocktail, which is copied below:

Quote
Try a cocktail. My favorite OTC pain med cocktail is ibuprofin and Tylenol...they enhance the effectiveness of each other, the same way tylenol boosts hydrocodone. I usually take about 400 mg Tylenol with 600 mg ibuprofin. It also takes longer to build a resistance and gives you a chance to drop your tolerance of your opiate based pain killers, which will make your vicodin much more effective

Is she correct or is this bad advice?  Could this work for the pain?  Is it safe to mix Tylenol and Ibuprofen?  I've always heard this was a big no no.

Also, if I stop taking the Vicodin for a while will my body drop the tolerance to it?

I know I should ask my doctor, but she's away on a long vacation and the physicians assistant that's filling in for her thinks fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are not real conditions.

Any input is greatly appreciated.
 
« Last Edit: 21/06/2008 18:44:12 by chris »


 

Offline RD

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #1 on: 19/06/2008 12:06:13 »
Also, if I stop taking the Vicodin for a while will my body drop the tolerance to it?

If you are going to stop taking Vicodin (under medical supervision) it should be tapered off over a week or two to avoid withdrawal symptoms, not stopped suddenly.

Quote
If a regular Vicodin user stops taking Vicodin, he or she will experience Vicodin Withdrawal within six to twelve hours but the symptoms are usually not life-threatening. The intensity of Vicodin Withdrawal depends on the degree of the Vicodin addiction. For example, the symptoms of withdrawal from Vicodin may grow stronger for twenty-four to seventy-two hours and then gradually decline over a period of seven to fourteen days.
http://www.addictionwithdrawal.com/vicodin.htm
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #2 on: 19/06/2008 12:45:38 »
Thank you RD.  I'm not addicted to Vicodin though.  At least, I don't think I am.  In fact, that's what I'm trying to avoid.  I don't take it every day, or even every week.  Sometimes I go weeks without taking it, and then when I do break down and take it, I don't take it for more than 3 days in a row.  It just seems that over the last year of taking it as needed, I've developed a tolerance or resistance to it.  I don't want to increase the dosage to make it continue to work and I don't want to become addicted to it.  What I want to know is if I stop taking it altogether for a few months will my body stop being tolerant to it so that it will start working again when I need it to?
 

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #3 on: 19/06/2008 13:10:01 »
This does not sound like an addiction to me at all..........especially as you seem to be so aware about the dosages you take and the fact that you do not seem to be dependent on it...albeit, you enjoy it!....but there's nothing wrong with enjoying something...it does not make you an automatic abuser.

I wish I could advise on your friends cocktail......it's certainly true that one can mix paracetamol and aspirin orientated drugs together but I would advise getting professional advice. If a doctors trip is not possible ..then how about your local pharmacist/chemist ?....is there not also an online health organization that you can email for advice.

I am so sorry for this awful condition and can well and truly imagine the pain you must be in must feel very severe.

I do wish you well and please do keep us updated will you ?
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #4 on: 19/06/2008 13:26:25 »




About a year ago I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  So far I've been able to manage the pain and have not let it stop my normal activities.  I see a chiropractor once a month, which seems to help.  I also take Vicodin, but only when the pain is extremely severe and only when it keeps me up for a few nights in a row..  Because it is an opiate....and because I like it sooo much...... I'm very careful about taking it.

Lately though, it doesn't seem to be working as well. I have even increased the dosage, but that doesn't help either.  My body seems to be developing a tolerance to it.  It's no longer getting rid of the pain or giving me that peaceful, relaxed, I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love.

This last week, the pain has been unbearable, to the point that I couldn't function.  I could barely get out of bed.  Easily the worst pain I've ever had with this condition.  Fortunately yesterday and today were a little better.

A friend recommended an OTC cocktail, which is copied below:

Quote
Try a cocktail. My favorite OTC pain med cocktail is ibuprofin and Tylenol...they enhance the effectiveness of each other, the same way tylenol boosts hydrocodone. I usually take about 400 mg Tylenol with 600 mg ibuprofin. It also takes longer to build a resistance and gives you a chance to drop your tolerance of your opiate based pain killers, which will make your vicodin much more effective

Is she correct or is this bad advice?  Could this work for the pain?  Is it safe to mix Tylenol and Ibuprofen?  I've always heard this was a big no no.

Also, if I stop taking the Vicodin for a while will my body drop the tolerance to it?

I know I should ask my doctor, but she's away on a long vacation and the physicians assistant that's filling in for her thinks fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are not real conditions.

Any input is greatly appreciated.
 
http://aids.about.com/od/miscellaneousmeds/a/vicodin.htm

The Dangers of Vicodin
From Mark Cichocki, R.N.,
Your Guide to AIDS / HIV.
About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by Susan Olender, MD
Effective Pain Relief With The Risk of Addiction
LK was prescribed Vicodin for pain control after he broke his shoulder in a car accident. He followed his prescription to the letter, only using the Vicodin when he was having pain. And the drug worked well for awhile. Two weeks after his injury, LK found that the prescribed dose was no longer relieving his pain so he took more Vicodin. On occasion, he took the drug sooner than he was supposed to in an attempt to avoid the onset of pain. It seemed to LK that he needed more medication to achieve the desired pain relief. He asked his doctor for a new prescription. Two weeks later he had already used a month's worth of Vicodin. When his doctor refused to write a new prescription, LK went to other doctors; he went to his dentist; he went to emergency rooms around town. LK was hooked on Vicodin. This scenario is typical in people who have become addicted to Vicodin. While the original intent of the medication is control of real and legitimate pain, misuse leads to addiction.

Vicodin Fact Sheet - How Does It Work?

What is Vicodin?
Vicodin is actually a combination of two pain relievers; acetaminophen, commonly known by the trade name Tylenol; and hydrocodone, a synthetic codeine. Vicodin is one of the most widely prescribed pain relievers and has become one of the most frequently abused.

Are You Addicted to Vicodin?
Because Vicodin has a high degree of physical and emotional dependence, anyone taking the drug should be aware of the warning signs of Vicodin addiction. Do you:

    * feel physically ill (muscle and bone pain, night sweats, insomnia, etc.) when you run out of Vicodin or stop taking Vicodin?
    * committ illegal acts such as juggling doctors or buy Vicodin on the street to maintain your supply?
    * need more pills to get the same or desired effect?
    * feel guilty or ashamed of your Vicodin use?
    * take Vicodin more often or in larger quantities than prescribed?
    * feel or have you been told your Vicodin use has become an issue with your family or loved ones?

If you answered "YES" to any of the above questions, your Vicodin use has reached a dangerous level. If so, talk to your doctor or a counselor about getting help. The longer you wait the more difficult it can be to kick your habit.

Substance Abuse & HIV

Are There Other Dangers Associated with Prolonged Vicodin Use?
Like any prescription medication, prolonged use or misuse can have dangerous consequences. In the case of Vicodin these dangers include:

    * Liver disease related to prolonged or excessive use of acetaminophen (contained in Vicodin).
    * Physical tolerance to the drug. After prolonged use, increased doses are needed to achieve the same pain relief. Because of the acetaminophen in Vicodin, increasing doses can lead to liver damage as mentioned above or in severe cases death from respiratory complications.
    * Drug interactions with MAO inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants

      Antidepressant Fact Sheets.

    * Physical and emotional dependence on Vicodin can occur after several weeks of continued use. Withdrawl symptoms such as insominia, night sweats, tremors, and agitation can occur when Vicodin is stopped.

Alcohol & Vicodin - A Dangerous Combination

Does the Combination of Hydrocodone and Acetaminophen Go By Other Names?
While the generic ingredients are hydrocodone and acetaminophen, the combination is know by many brand names including:

    * Vicodin, Vicodin HP, and Vicodin ES
      (depending on the concentrations of hydrocodone and acetaminophen)
    * Lortab
    * Anexsia
    * Zydone
    * Lorcet
    * Norco

The Dangers of Crystal Meth

Vicodin is an effective pain reliever when used properly and for the short term. Careless, inappropriate, or diliberate misuse of Vicodin can be dangerous. If you are taking Vicodin now, talk to your physician about a pain control strategy that does not include Vicodin or other addictive pain medications. If you feel you are addicted either physically or emotionally to Vicodin, talk to your doctor, a counselor or a substance abuse professional as soon as possible to avoid the inevitable dangers of Vicodin.

I am trying to use alternatives as in the very short time I have used it it is already showing in my liver and kidneys...Why we are switching to that "Zylamend."
« Last Edit: 19/06/2008 13:52:38 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #5 on: 19/06/2008 13:51:40 »
Carolyn when you need to use more to receive the desired results you are describing the beginning of an addiction.. You need to stop.. Its like nasal spray rebound after awhile it takes more usage to achieve the open airway because your body starts to need more for it to work so the original dose no longer has the same effect the same holds true with most any drug your body has become Dependant on, physically. It is also a emotional thing like with vicodin. You described basically that "It's no longer getting rid of the pain or giving me that peaceful, relaxed, I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love." That is describing the lack of that euphoric feeling that goes away when the addiction is present.. because you need more to make the stuff work!
It is seriously easy to get addicted to over a short period of time .. you have been using it way longer then me... I already have trouble after just a few months... Its good you noticed these things so you can switch.. like you are trying to do... I think you are wise to do so!

Wish you well and hope you are feeling better really soon!
« Last Edit: 19/06/2008 13:54:11 by Karen W. »
 

Offline RD

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #6 on: 19/06/2008 14:05:02 »
Possible alternative to opiates ...
Quote
Some anticonvulsant drugs are effective in treating bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, and various kinds of pain...

The anticonvulsants are also known as anti-epileptics. They were designed -- and are approved by the Food and Drug Administration -- primarily to treat people who have various kinds of seizure disorders, including seizures or convulsions caused by epilepsy, strokes, and brain tumors. Several -- phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol,), ethotoin (Peganone), and valproic acid/divalproex (Depakene/Depakote) -- have been on the market since the 1950s. But a "second generation" of anticonvulsants was developed in the 1990s. These include gabapentin (Neurontin), lamotrigine (Lamictal), pregabalin (Lyrica) and topiramate (Topamax)...

The report notes that the FDA has now approved several anticonvulsants to treat conditions other than seizures. Namely, divalproex, lamotrigine (Lamictal), and carbamazepine have been approved to treat the manic phases of bipolar disorder; carbamazepine, gabapentin (Neurontin), and pregabalin (Lyrica) have been approved to treat various forms of nerve pain; and pregabalin (Lyrica) was just recently (in June 2007) approved to treat fibromyalgia -- an often chronic condition characterized by muscle pain or soreness, joint tenderness or pain, fatigue, and a chronic, low-grade flu-like feeling.
http://fibrotoday.blogspot.com/2007_09_01_archive.html
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #7 on: 19/06/2008 14:19:39 »
Oh Yeah Carolyn I wanted to tell you.. You can call the poison control center and give them a full list of your medicines and they will tell you what you can take or mix with what.. They are terrific and can also tell you how to stop taking medications safely.. They are really really good! Especially with your Doctor out of town!
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #8 on: 20/06/2008 06:23:22 »
This does not sound like an addiction to me at all..........especially as you seem to be so aware about the dosages you take and the fact that you do not seem to be dependent on it...albeit, you enjoy it!....but there's nothing wrong with enjoying something...it does not make you an automatic abuser.

I wish I could advise on your friends cocktail......it's certainly true that one can mix paracetamol and aspirin orientated drugs together but I would advise getting professional advice. If a doctors trip is not possible ..then how about your local pharmacist/chemist ?....is there not also an online health organization that you can email for advice.

I am so sorry for this awful condition and can well and truly imagine the pain you must be in must feel very severe.

I do wish you well and please do keep us updated will you ?

Thank you for the well wishes Neil.  I do not have the patience to email the online health organization.....I HATE waiting on email responses!  I will call my pharmacist today though and ask him about the cocktail.  Don't know why I didn't think of that myself.  Probably because he's not very nice and I don't like him at all. :)
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #9 on: 20/06/2008 06:53:52 »
Karen - Thank you for the concern and for taking the time to find all of this information.

I do want to point out however that I am not addicted or on the verge of being addicted to vicodin.


Are You Addicted to Vicodin?
Because Vicodin has a high degree of physical and emotional dependence, anyone taking the drug should be aware of the warning signs of Vicodin addiction. Do you:

    * feel physically ill (muscle and bone pain, night sweats, insomnia, etc.) when you run out of Vicodin or stop taking Vicodin?
    * committ illegal acts such as juggling doctors or buy Vicodin on the street to maintain your supply?
   * need more pills to get the same or desired effect?
    * feel guilty or ashamed of your Vicodin use?
    * take Vicodin more often or in larger quantities than prescribed?
    * feel or have you been told your Vicodin use has become an issue with your family or loved ones?

If you answered "YES" to any of the above questions, your Vicodin use has reached a dangerous level. If so, talk to your doctor or a counselor about getting help. The longer you wait the more difficult it can be to kick your habit.
reversible arrow

The muscle pain and insomnia I suffer from are from Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndome, not from withdrawal symptoms.  Stress and anxiety, at least for me, are major contributors or triggers for Fibromyalgia symptoms.  Due to some personal issues with my daughter, I've been under an inordinate amount both stress and anxiety, which has lead to extreme pain and exhaustion.

Quote
    * Physical and emotional dependence on Vicodin can occur after several weeks of continued use. Withdrawl symptoms such as insominia, night sweats, tremors, and agitation can occur when Vicodin is stopped.

I have been using Vicodin for a little over a year now, but as I've said, I don't take it every day or every week.  Sometimes I go weeks without taking it.  I would also like to point out that I'm still on my original prescription of 30 pills, 7.5-750 mg.  I have 5  left and I gave 5 to my mother (no lectures on sharing meds please).  This means I've only taken 20 pills over the last year.  I am in pain most everyday, but most of the time I try  to deal with it without the use of meds.

Carolyn when you need to use more to receive the desired results you are describing the beginning of an addiction.. You need to stop.. Its like nasal spray rebound after awhile it takes more usage to achieve the open airway because your body starts to need more for it to work so the original dose no longer has the same effect the same holds true with most any drug your body has become Dependant on, physically. It is also a emotional thing like with vicodin. You described basically that "It's no longer getting rid of the pain or giving me that peaceful, relaxed, I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love." That is describing the lack of that euphoric feeling that goes away when the addiction is present.. because you need more to make the stuff work!It is seriously easy to get addicted to over a short period of time .. you have been using it way longer then me... I already have trouble after just a few months... Its good you noticed these things so you can switch.. like you are trying to do... I think you are wise to do so!

Wish you well and hope you are feeling better really soon!

Developing a tolerance to a drug is completely different than having an addiction to it.

http://www.howtocopewithpain.org/blog/169/medication-pain-narcotic-opiate/

Quote
2. Tolerance
When narcotics are used, over time your body gets used to their effect.  So to get the same effect, often a higher and higher dose is needed.  Often as the dosage is increased to continue to get a benefit, the side effects continue to increase.  However, don’t mistake tolerance, which is simply a physical process, with addiction.

3. Addiction
True addiction is a disease in which people continue to use a substance (alcohol or drugs), despite bad consequences such as physical illness, relationship problems or inability to function at work.  Just because your body is tolerant to a medication, doesn’t mean you’re addicted.  Addiction is a behavior; tolerance is a physical process.

However, a small percentage of patients who use narcotics will develop true addiction, with symptoms such as lying about how much medication they’re using, doctor shopping to get more prescriptions, obtaining narcotics illegally, and using the medication to get high rather than to control pain.  Only about 5% of patients who are prescribed narcotics for chronic pain develop addiction.  The risk is higher in people who’ve been addicted to drugs or alcohol in the past, and for those who have few other coping skills to deal with pain.

I've never done any of those things associated with addiction.

Yes, I do like Vicodin.  I like the way it makes me feel when I'm hurting.  It is a somewhat euphoric effect.  I've made statements such as "that I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love."  I've called Vicodin "Vicofriend".  These were lame attempts at humor, nothing more.

Over the years, I've taken different pain meds.  They've all made me sick, jumpy and jittery.  Vicodin is the only one that didn't.  Just because I like the effects of a medicine does not make me addicted.  If given a choice, I (like most everyone else) would choose the ones that give that euphoric feeling over the ones that make you feel like crap.


I still would like to know if you develop a tolerance to a medication, will that tolerance eventually go away if the medication is stopped for an extended period of time.



 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #10 on: 20/06/2008 06:56:28 »
Possible alternative to opiates ...
Quote
Some anticonvulsant drugs are effective in treating bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, and various kinds of pain...

The anticonvulsants are also known as anti-epileptics. They were designed -- and are approved by the Food and Drug Administration -- primarily to treat people who have various kinds of seizure disorders, including seizures or convulsions caused by epilepsy, strokes, and brain tumors. Several -- phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol,), ethotoin (Peganone), and valproic acid/divalproex (Depakene/Depakote) -- have been on the market since the 1950s. But a "second generation" of anticonvulsants was developed in the 1990s. These include gabapentin (Neurontin), lamotrigine (Lamictal), pregabalin (Lyrica) and topiramate (Topamax)...

The report notes that the FDA has now approved several anticonvulsants to treat conditions other than seizures. Namely, divalproex, lamotrigine (Lamictal), and carbamazepine have been approved to treat the manic phases of bipolar disorder; carbamazepine, gabapentin (Neurontin), and pregabalin (Lyrica) have been approved to treat various forms of nerve pain; and pregabalin (Lyrica) was just recently (in June 2007) approved to treat fibromyalgia -- an often chronic condition characterized by muscle pain or soreness, joint tenderness or pain, fatigue, and a chronic, low-grade flu-like feeling.
http://fibrotoday.blogspot.com/2007_09_01_archive.html

Thanks RD.  When my doctor comes back into town, I will discuss these alternatives.  Thanks for taking the time to find all of this information.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #11 on: 20/06/2008 13:28:21 »
Karen - Thank you for the concern and for taking the time to find all of this information.

I do want to point out however that I am not addicted or on the verge of being addicted to vicodin.


Are You Addicted to Vicodin?
Because Vicodin has a high degree of physical and emotional dependence, anyone taking the drug should be aware of the warning signs of Vicodin addiction. Do you:

    * feel physically ill (muscle and bone pain, night sweats, insomnia, etc.) when you run out of Vicodin or stop taking Vicodin?
    * committ illegal acts such as juggling doctors or buy Vicodin on the street to maintain your supply?
    * need more pills to get the same or desired effect?
    * feel guilty or ashamed of your Vicodin use?
    * take Vicodin more often or in larger quantities than prescribed?
    * feel or have you been told your Vicodin use has become an issue with your family or loved ones?

If you answered "YES" to any of the above questions, your Vicodin use has reached a dangerous level. If so, talk to your doctor or a counselor about getting help. The longer you wait the more difficult it can be to kick your habit.
reversible arrow

The muscle pain and insomnia I suffer from are from Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndome, not from withdrawal symptoms.  Stress and anxiety, at least for me, are major contributors or triggers for Fibromyalgia symptoms.  Due to some personal issues with my daughter, I've been under an inordinate amount both stress and anxiety, which has lead to extreme pain and exhaustion.

Quote
    * Physical and emotional dependence on Vicodin can occur after several weeks of continued use. Withdrawl symptoms such as insominia, night sweats, tremors, and agitation can occur when Vicodin is stopped.

I have been using Vicodin for a little over a year now, but as I've said, I don't take it every day or every week.  Sometimes I go weeks without taking it.  I would also like to point out that I'm still on my original prescription of 30 pills, 7.5-750 mg.  I have 5  left and I gave 5 to my mother (no lectures on sharing meds please).  This means I've only taken 20 pills over the last year.  I am in pain most everyday, but most of the time I try  to deal with it without the use of meds.

Carolyn when you need to use more to receive the desired results you are describing the beginning of an addiction.. You need to stop.. Its like nasal spray rebound after awhile it takes more usage to achieve the open airway because your body starts to need more for it to work so the original dose no longer has the same effect the same holds true with most any drug your body has become Dependant on, physically. It is also a emotional thing like with vicodin. You described basically that "It's no longer getting rid of the pain or giving me that peaceful, relaxed, I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love." That is describing the lack of that euphoric feeling that goes away when the addiction is present.. because you need more to make the stuff work!It is seriously easy to get addicted to over a short period of time .. you have been using it way longer then me... I already have trouble after just a few months... Its good you noticed these things so you can switch.. like you are trying to do... I think you are wise to do so!

Wish you well and hope you are feeling better really soon!

Developing a tolerance to a drug is completely different than having an addiction to it.

http://www.howtocopewithpain.org/blog/169/medication-pain-narcotic-opiate/

Quote
2. Tolerance
When narcotics are used, over time your body gets used to their effect.  So to get the same effect, often a higher and higher dose is needed.  Often as the dosage is increased to continue to get a benefit, the side effects continue to increase.  However, don’t mistake tolerance, which is simply a physical process, with addiction.

3. Addiction
True addiction is a disease in which people continue to use a substance (alcohol or drugs), despite bad consequences such as physical illness, relationship problems or inability to function at work.  Just because your body is tolerant to a medication, doesn’t mean you’re addicted.  Addiction is a behavior; tolerance is a physical process.

However, a small percentage of patients who use narcotics will develop true addiction, with symptoms such as lying about how much medication they’re using, doctor shopping to get more prescriptions, obtaining narcotics illegally, and using the medication to get high rather than to control pain.  Only about 5% of patients who are prescribed narcotics for chronic pain develop addiction.  The risk is higher in people who’ve been addicted to drugs or alcohol in the past, and for those who have few other coping skills to deal with pain.

I've never done any of those things associated with addiction.

Yes, I do like Vicodin.  I like the way it makes me feel when I'm hurting.  It is a somewhat euphoric effect.  I've made statements such as "that I don't give a s*** feeling that I've come to know and love."  I've called Vicodin "Vicofriend".  These were lame attempts at humor, nothing more.

Over the years, I've taken different pain meds.  They've all made me sick, jumpy and jittery.  Vicodin is the only one that didn't.  Just because I like the effects of a medicine does not make me addicted.  If given a choice, I (like most everyone else) would choose the ones that give that euphoric feeling over the ones that make you feel like crap.


I still would like to know if you develop a tolerance to a medication, will that tolerance eventually go away if the medication is stopped for an extended period of time.





LOL I don't think you are addicted I think you recognized the fact that they were not working like before and are taking steps to fix it.. which is good as I stated ... but I posted those things because I have had aquaintes who have been addicted to it and those are the first symtoms.. one of my friends died because of it! she was in severe pain from a really really bad automobile accident.. and got addicted by simply following normal doesage and not being able to tolerate other pain meds, so she upped the dose a bit but it did not help..  was bad as over a short time it killed her... another friend from gradeshool who died from Tylonal posoning I think I mentioned that to you all a couple years ago.. I am happy you are looking for another alternative.. Good for you.. The vicodin never gave me the euphoic feeling Just completely took me out cold for two days at a time.. not good at all. I hate pills...

 I hope you find something that works.

Hey I did not know you had CFS.. I do also. Know very little about it right now but expect I am in for a ride I am not liking so far!
Hope you feel better soon!

Oh This is a good point thanks for the link..

Developing a tolerance to a drug is completely different than having an addiction to it.

http://www.howtocopewithpain.org/blog/169/medication-pain-narcotic-opiate/
« Last Edit: 20/06/2008 13:36:08 by Karen W. »
 

Offline Carolyn

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #12 on: 21/06/2008 06:22:10 »
No problem Karen. Nic has been away this week and when he returned yesterday he got on the site the first chance he got.  He read this thread and proceeded to question me a great deal about the Fibromyalgia and especially addiction to pain pills which is why I felt the need to clarify.
 

Offline Karen W.

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Re: Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #13 on: 21/06/2008 06:45:03 »

Oh sorry.. I realize you knew about that not being the only sign... it has to be coupled with many other symptoms.. Did he learn lots about your illness?
 

Offline OldDragon

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Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #14 on: 21/06/2008 20:49:28 »
...The muscle pain and insomnia I suffer from are from Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndome, not from withdrawal symptoms.  Stress and anxiety, at least for me, are major contributors or triggers for Fibromyalgia symptoms.  Due to some personal issues with my daughter, I've been under an inordinate amount both stress and anxiety, which has lead to extreme pain and exhaustion.

Carolyn, I have found that, as part of managing my own fibro/CFS symptoms, I have to address any stress or issues liable to cause anxiety, and deal with those by identifying and addressing the underlying fears. Sometimes I need a bit of help to do this, and have a good support network of friends upon whom I can call, and who are using the same type of self-help and support.

My fibro/CFS symptoms are certainly less severe or frequent when I get it right, and I'm able to address those with only minimal medication.

When the severe flares have occurred, then I can tie these to the physical stress that my body has been subjected to and by illnesses and the rise in necessary medications.

Prior to this latest severe flare of mine, the last was in 2003 and when I had a nasty chest infection, and the coughing to clear that triggered my chronic back problem into an acute one, having inflamed the affected area and escalated into the muscle spasms due to pressure on the nerves, although that one was not on a par with the latest. Hot spots can then be such that I can barely tolerate wearing anything but the lightest clothing and even then it feels as if that is rubbing on scalded skin at times. Of course, there's rarely anything to see or heat to feel by a third party, which is what makes it so difficult sometimes for some doctors to diagnose.

I've had fibro/CFS diagnosed since 93/94 and believe I've had it since early '92. I know quite a few others with it or similar/related conditions. Everyone's different, but those of us who have been comparing notes and observing what triggers symptoms agree that avoiding stress and anxiety and dealing with it, leads to significant improvement in symptoms - and we have noticed how those amongst us that don't, seem to suffer more, and feel the need for greater medication. Those of use able to turn over and let go of potential stressful issues at the emotional level, require less medication.

That also seems to apply to other conditions we might develop post-fibro diagnosis, as well as pre-existing ones.

What Karen's posted is well worth thorough reading. Were it not for my familiarity with addictions and having worked with substance misusers and associating with other colleagues in recovery, I might easily have missed these things myself when being heavily medicated for fibro/CFS back in the early days. Street drugs and prescribed medication are no different in the effects they can have on the body, and just because something is prescribed by a doctor for a medical condition, and to someone with no history of substance misuse, doesn't mean the person concerned isn't going to experience the same addictive effects.

When I was taking a lot of medication, colleagues in recovery from narcotic addictions (often many years clean themselves) were monitoring me and alerting me to the need to question myself and my  doctor - and I was identifying with them in their using days as well as clients. Bodies can easily develop dependencies and tolerances, and mine certainly does. I just have to monitor myself so that I am aware of the warning signs and then deal with those as they emerge, and by being open and honest when working with my doctor.
« Last Edit: 21/06/2008 20:56:42 by OldDragon »
 

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Are "over the counter" medications safe to mix?
« Reply #14 on: 21/06/2008 20:49:28 »

 

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