The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: BONG Anyone?  (Read 3235 times)

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2331
  • KIS Keep It Simple
    • View Profile
BONG Anyone?
« on: 13/07/2008 16:33:03 »
BONG?

I have observed the use of bongs increasing respiratory infections among the youth population. The emerging sores around the mouth, ulcers on the tongue and breath like a rickshaw pullers Jockstrap. An d have constantly advised when I can that this practice could lead to someone getting a serious life threatening disease. It was not scaremonger tactics but a common sense audible and visual observation from several young adults who I know are sharing bongs and smoking cannabis. And who often exhibit lesions around the mouth area and who regularly have a chest that sounds like a person with serious terminal chest complaint.

A recent study has added some serious concerns about the safety of sharing and smoking bongs.

 
EGYPT: Water pipe smoking a significant TB risk .

CAIRO, 24 March 2008 (IRIN) - The smoking of the traditional 'shisha' water pipe is increasingly emerging as a significant health risk in Egypt, due to air-borne tuberculosis (TB) transmission from pipe sharing.

http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/IRIN/96ca09661d2583b99494da1d31ec5a19.htm

An argument against this could be that the microbes inside the water pipe should be killed by the nicotine, smoke and heat from burning the tobacco. Yet the person smoking bongs excessively often develops every cold and infection going and generally has poorer health than those that do not engage in this practice.


TB is on the increase in the United Kingdom and many countries despite what the Ministers may tell us. The following paper is certainly worth a read for those who are not familiar with TB and the risks. It has some x ray pictures of infected lungs and some interesting case observations along with a rather erroneous quote from a minister in 1989. Stating that TB has been virtually wiped out in the U.K.

TUBERCULOSIS: no longer down and out
P D O Davies, MA DM FRCP, Director,
Tuberculosis Research Unit, Cardiothoracic Centre,
Thomas Drive, Liverpool, L14 3PE, UK
First Published December 1996
 
Cases of Tuberculosis in England and Wales increased from 5,086 in 1987 to 5,961 in 1993: a 17% increase. Some notorious hot spots such as Leicester and Bradford actually showed a decrease of about 15% over these 6 years, but others such as Leeds (11%), Manchester (12%) and inner London (25%) showed substantial increases. But top of the bill with a (30%) increase came Liverpool.


http://priory.com/med/tubercul.htm


 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8648
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
BONG Anyone?
« Reply #1 on: 13/07/2008 17:15:51 »
Smoke isn't good for the lungs and damaged lungs are more likely to get infection. Nothing really new and not specific to bongs. What we need to do is dissuade people from smoking in general. I guess there must be some risk of bacterial transmission associated with passing a joint round- or a cider bottle.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2331
  • KIS Keep It Simple
    • View Profile
BONG Anyone?
« Reply #2 on: 13/07/2008 17:35:30 »
Or indeed a kiss on a New Years Eve. But sharing bongs has become very popular with Teenagers and young to mid twenties and tends to attract young males in particular who are sometimes less hygienic and more promiscuous than females so there may be a significant increased risk factor. A spliff for example will have a short life and is replaced by another spliff. Whereas the bong awaits a thorough clean which in reality is seldom more than a quick scrape out and a change of water, so there is a greater risk of pathogens from a water pipe or a bong.
 

paul.fr

  • Guest
BONG Anyone?
« Reply #3 on: 14/07/2008 17:31:03 »
Oh, I thought this was going to be about the news at 10...
 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8126
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
BONG Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: 14/07/2008 17:48:38 »
Cases of Tuberculosis in England and Wales increased from 5,086 in 1987 to 5,961 in 1993: a 17% increase. Some notorious hot spots such as Leicester and Bradford actually showed a decrease of about 15% over these 6 years, but others such as Leeds (11%), Manchester (12%) and inner London (25%) showed substantial increases. But top of the bill with a (30%) increase came Liverpool.
http://priory.com/med/tubercul.htm

These increases in TB are more likely to be immigrants from countries where TB is endemic, rather than contaminated drug paraphernalia.
http://www.mass.gov/Eeohhs2/docs/dph/cdc/tb/endemic_country_list.pdf
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

BONG Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: 14/07/2008 17:48:38 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums