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Author Topic: Is there a method to determine the number of oxidation states for an element?  (Read 4545 times)

Offline siewwen168

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Hello everyone.I wanna ask something about chemistry.:)

Is there a method to determine how many oxidation states that an element can exist?normally those can have more than one oxidation states is from the D-block element,such as copper(+2,+3) and titanium(+1,+2,+3,+4) and so on.:(:(

I have no idea how to find out the number of oxidation states that an element can exist,for example nikel,is there anyone can help?:D
« Last Edit: 30/01/2009 21:16:28 by chris »


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is there a method to determine how many oxidation states that an element can exist?
No, you just have to remember them!
 

Offline lightarrow

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such as copper(+2,+3) and titanium(+1,+2,+3,+4)
No. Copper (+1,+2), Titanium (+2,+3,+4).
 

Online Bored chemist

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IIRC Copper(III) does exist in a few obscure compounds.
BTW, why does everyone miss out zero as an oxidation state?
The elements are in a zero oxidation state (of course) but things like Ni(CO)4 (nickel carbonyl) and such have a zero oxidation state but are fairly stable compounds.
In some cases you can even get metals in negative oxidation states.

(Oh dear! I probably justr put someone off chemistry for life)
 

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