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Author Topic: Does a graviton have a frequency?  (Read 3495 times)

Offline LeeE

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« on: 21/07/2008 00:45:25 »
...just curious, because if it doesn't, not only does it have no mass but it must also have no energy either.  In fact, with no mass, or energy, if it does exist, what exactly is existing?


 

Offline Supercryptid

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #1 on: 21/07/2008 05:06:09 »
Even though gravitons are hypothetical, I'd say that they would indeed have a frequency, wavelength, and the other things you might associate with a wave of energy. They would be similar to photons, but have a different spin and a different effect on matter.
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #2 on: 21/07/2008 08:08:34 »
Even though gravitons are hypothetical, I'd say that they would indeed have a frequency, wavelength, and the other things you might associate with a wave of energy. They would be similar to photons, but have a different spin and a different effect on matter.

I have nothing to add except that gravitons are spin-2.
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #3 on: 21/07/2008 09:36:19 »
Assuming that the energy of a graviton is Planck's constant times the frequency and that the frequencies of gravitons are related to the duration of the interaction the only things around that are anything above a low audio frequency in gravitation are rotating neutron stars which can get up to about 1KHz now electromagnetic waves at 1KHz have incredibly feeble photons and the only frequencies that get photons of a reasonable energy are infra red and above so high energy gravitons could only be produced by tiny black holes interacting very strongly.   This is something we just don't see in our universe at the moment although it may have happened in the past.
« Last Edit: 21/07/2008 09:39:23 by Soul Surfer »
 

lyner

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #4 on: 21/07/2008 11:30:16 »
That sounds eminently reasonable. Gravitational interactions would be essentially macroscopic / classical, perceived more like radio communications than quantised energy. The upside of this would be that phase and pulse shape information would be available.
 

Offline Bishadi

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #5 on: 21/07/2008 15:28:00 »
...just curious, because if it doesn't, not only does it have no mass but it must also have no energy either.  In fact, with no mass, or energy, if it does exist, what exactly is existing?


look up casimir....  below is a basic idea

note the potential varied by environment and the 'f' of the exchanging energy... 
Quote
In physics, the Casimir effect and the Casimir-Polder force are physical forces arising from a quantized field. The typical example is of two uncharged metallic plates in a vacuum, placed a few micrometers apart, without any external electromagnetic field. In a classical description, the lack of an external field also means that there is no field between the plates, and no force would be measured between them. When this field is instead studied using quantum mechanics, it is seen that the plates do affect the virtual photons which constitute the field, and generate a net force


gravity is simply entangled energy between mass; increase the shared energy and proportionally an increased potential.....


p/s to look at the math, note the inverse square rule represent itself..... kind of familiar with newton?



note the 'curve' of the galaxy rotation   http://cosmology.berkeley.edu/Education/Essays/galrotcurve.html

http://www.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/rotcurve.htm

« Last Edit: 21/07/2008 15:30:20 by Bishadi »
 

Offline LeeE

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
« Reply #6 on: 21/07/2008 18:17:02 »
Thanks for the comments folks.
 

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Does a graviton have a frequency?
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